Forgot your password?

How many devices are connected to your home Wi-Fi?

Displaying poll results.
1 - 2
  1925 votes / 7%
3 - 4
  4418 votes / 16%
5 - 6
  5683 votes / 21%
7 - 8
  4199 votes / 16%
9 - 10
  2069 votes / 7%
More than 10
  5947 votes / 22%
Hard to tell since I chipped all the squirrels in the neighborhood
  1991 votes / 7%
26232 total votes.
[ Voting Booth | Other Polls | Back Home ]
  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

How many devices are connected to your home Wi-Fi?

Comments Filter:
  • by Maxwell (13985) on Wednesday August 20, 2014 @03:59PM (#47715531) Homepage

    For everything else, I'll take my solid-as-a-rock Gigabit ethernet thanks. Also, off the lawn please!

    • by antdude (79039) on Wednesday August 20, 2014 @04:22PM (#47715741) Homepage Journal

      Ditto. I like the old fashion network cables that is stable, secured, and fast. Wireless is only for portable devices and far away.

      • by ArcherB (796902)

        Ditto. I like the old fashion network cables that is stable, secured, and fast. Wireless is only for portable devices and far away.

        I've never had a wireless cord get unplugged from moving my PC. However, your point is well taken.

    • by crow (16139) on Wednesday August 20, 2014 @08:14PM (#47717217) Homepage Journal

      Absolutely!

      I'm so glad that I wired our house for ethernet. Granted, WiFi wasn't quite up to speed fifteen years ago, but ethernet is rock solid.

      Wired on ethernet, we have:
      *) My laptop docking station
      *) My wife's iMac
      *) network laser printer
      *) game console
      *) MythTV DVR
      *) Blu-Ray player
      *) HDHR Prime TV tuner
      *) OBI100 phone adapter

      The WiFi has just one phone and one tablet except when we have guests, though I also have an ethernet outlet in the guest bedroom.

      It was interesting to retrofit the house's wiring for ethernet. Mostly it was a matter of using existing phone or coax cables to pull new cables and converting the old single-purpose outlets into multi-outlets. Most place I put in two ethernet, one phone, and one coax. The coax has been a complete waste, but otherwise it was a great plan.

    • by hodet (620484)

      Agreed. I ran CAT5e all over the place when I built my house in 2005.

      • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 21, 2014 @12:07PM (#47721815)

        I went one better....
        Dry-pipe conduit to each bedroom - (3/4") stubbed in the basement just below the sill plate to a deep 4x4 box (single gang mud-ring) in the bedroom wall. That way I can pull in what I need, then rip it out and pull in the next level (fiber?) when I want/need to. Similar boxes installed on main floor. In family room - had low (outlet level) and high (18" off ceiling) boxes installed in the four corners for speaker, coax, network, etc.

        3/4" conduit will easily handle two Coax, two Cat5/6's, and two cat 3 (6-pair POTS). It's also large enough to slide a HDMI connector through (if necessary). make that your first cable, though.

        I also had a 1" conduit between the basement and attic area installed along with a similar one in the chimney chase (think Dish/DirectTV) stubbed in the basement.

        Network terminates to two 24-port Cat 5e 568B Panduit panels work was pitching from a network upgrade. Main switch is a 24 port Netgear (10/100) w/ a dozen of those being PoE. Picked up two dozen color coded 3' (1m) patch cables to keep things looking spiffy and easy to trace back.

        Builder thought I was nuts... made adding two cat 5/6's to each BR a 1/2 day weekend project rather than a week long one. Also, I know my cables are encased in a steel pipe in the wall and final work looks neat an tidy at both ends. Which keeps the wife happy - a very important thing.

        Finally, always check with local codes, plug holes for fires with suitable material, label BOTH ends (several times) when pulling, leave a generous amount for neat and tidy termination, and never install mains power in the same pipe as low-voltage (e.g. coax, CAT, speaker, HDMI, etc.). Generally against code and just asking for trouble.

        FredInIT

    • by Archtech (159117) on Thursday August 21, 2014 @07:53AM (#47719493)

      Very wise. I agree that it's best to use cable whenever you can - faster, more secure, more reliable. Wireless is trendy but relatively insecure; and, in houses like mine, radically unreliable. One stone wall stops it cold, so there are very few working geometric configurations.

      I also use powerline networking to complement the Ethernet cables. It's faster and more secure than wireless, and far more reliable. And it's available from every power point in the house.

    • by green1 (322787)

      Exactly, wifi is for devices that can't be wired. I actually miscounted when I voted apparently though, I forgot about a gaming system which is wireless only because some idiot engineer somewhere decided that a stationary device, designed to connect to the internet, should be built without an ethernet port!

      2 person household
      Wireless: 2 laptops, 4 phones, 1 Wii
      Wired: 1 desktop PC, 2 NAS devices, 1 printer, 1 media streaming device, 1 Blu-ray player

      As a side note, if you want people off your lawn, you shouldn

      • I forgot about a gaming system which is wireless only because some idiot engineer somewhere decided that a stationary device, designed to connect to the internet, should be built without an ethernet port!

        Cost savings. Our first Blu-ray player (which died 4 days after the 3 year (extended) warrantee expired) had an Ethernet port and 2 USB ports. The 2nd USB was designated for the optional ($80) WiFi adapter. While researching a replacement, I noticed that most reviews for the one that just died complained about the lack of WiFi and how hard it was to get Ethernet to it (interesting how old reviews stay around). The replacement has WiFi, no Ethernet and only 1 USB (we bought it 2 years ago).

    • by Pharmboy (216950)

      Right idea, but we have two tabs, two laptops, two phones, etc. Everything that is fixed, yes, hardwired.

    • Desktops and the laser printer are all hard-wired. But we have two laptops, two phones, two tablets, and the Blu-ray player that are all wireless. Sometimes a third laptop. That puts me squarely in 7-8 territory.

  • None (Score:5, Informative)

    by Yunzil (181064) on Wednesday August 20, 2014 @04:00PM (#47715539) Homepage

    I don't have home wi-fi. (You insensitive clod.)

    • Yeah, I would have selected zero if it was an option. But alas.
    • by DERoss (1919496)

      I paid someone to go into my cramped upper attic (during a hot summer day) and run a cable from my wife's PC to our router, which is located in our lower attic on the other side of the wall from my own PC. He then ran a cable from the TV cable to our modem. This latter involved removing several cable splices in favor of just 1 or 2 in order to improve the quality of the signal.

      Although I had subscribed to Time Warner Cable for Internet service, the system did not work. TWC had to come to my house and lay

    • by jez9999 (618189)

      Yup, I have no need for home Wifi, but then I don't have a laptop. Just a wired desktop. Quaint in this day and age.

  • Family of 5 here and we have:

    4 smart phones

    3 tablets

    4 laptops

    ipod

    Chromecast

    Wii

    Everything else is wired although several could be wireless:

    PS3

    PS4

    2 desktops

    Fileserver

    Sprinkler controller (Open SprinklerPI)

    2 DirecTV HD DVRs

    HP B&W laser printer

    Ricoh color laser printer (powered down)

    DVD player

  • by kramer2718 (598033) on Wednesday August 20, 2014 @04:21PM (#47715737) Homepage
    How many devices are connected to the free WiFi of the bar downstairs? I don't know, but my apartment gets the best receptions and the bandwidth is pretty good.
  • On the WiFi:

    1 Printer
    3 Phones
    1 iPod
    2 Laptops
    4 Tablets

    Wired in:

    1 Server
    1 (My) Desktop
    1 Encoding Box (movies/cds)
    4 DirecTV boxes
    1 xBox 360
    1 Wii
    1 "Smart" TV (not too smart IMHO)

    The WiFi count grows / shrinks based on who is over at the house too...

    • by fizzer06 (1500649)
      Does the pedophile's van parked in front of the house count?
    • by Psyko (69453)

      1 "Smart" TV (not too smart IMHO)

      I've got a "smart" tv too, but it's not smart enough to count to 10 without skipping numbers. Volume control is hdmi-cec to a reciever, start from zero going up 1 increment at a time it's like 1,2,4,5,6,8,10 but the receiver can keep track of #'s...Goes like that all the way up.. by the time the receiver is at 30ish, the tv thinks it's at 50 something...

      • by almitydave (2452422) on Wednesday August 20, 2014 @06:22PM (#47716579)

        1 "Smart" TV (not too smart IMHO)

        I've got a "smart" tv too, but it's not smart enough to count to 10 without skipping numbers. Volume control is hdmi-cec to a reciever, start from zero going up 1 increment at a time it's like 1,2,4,5,6,8,10 but the receiver can keep track of #'s...Goes like that all the way up.. by the time the receiver is at 30ish, the tv thinks it's at 50 something...

        Looks like your TV uses Imperial volume, like your receiver, but is displaying metric units.

  • Although I have a few devices that COULD be connected to WiFi, I do not have a connection at home. All computers, printers, game consoles (Wii flavors and Xbox360), NAS, and home audio are connected to a wired Gbit network. Makes the Nook tablets unable to connect to the 'net at home, but, at home, I don't need them connected, anyway, since I feed them by SD card.

    • Same here, all devices connected via Gbit network. Ran Cat5e cable everywhere. No need for WiFi.
    • "Makes the Nook tablets unable to connect to the 'net at home, but, at home, I don't need them connected, anyway, since I feed them by SD card."

      E-readers gently sip at the battery, until you turn on the wireless radio. By leaving my Paperwhite in airplane mode I get about double the battery life, about 2-3 weeks of heavy reading.

  • For us it's phones and iPods, laptops and an old P4 2.4GHz in the garage which drives the CNC machine (wifi is the easist way to get gcode files from the main PC to the garage PC).

  • Most days, there are 4-5 devices connected, but if I had everything turned on with a WEP 802.11b connection (for compatibility with older devices), I'd have: 4 laptops, 2 tablets, 5 smartphones, 2 iPods, 5 portable game systems, 1 of the DVR boxes, 2 media streamers, and 4 video game consoles. There's some more connected to the gigabit network. On the average day, my wife and I each have a cell phone and a laptop turned on, and the wireless is secured so that half of those devices can't talk to it anyhow.
  • I went with 5, but one of those is a wifi extender I'm using as a bridge So ironically the only wired devices are on the other side of a wifi link.
  • I never thought about that before... ...but suddenly I want to.

  • If you can't plug it in, you're not getting online here.

    One Wifi device with encryption enabled slows down my router so badly that it has trouble resolving domain names. Screw that.

  • 5G wireless gives me almost 30 megabytes/second which is faster than a 100mbit ethernet connection. Only trouble is not a lot of devices support 5G.
    I do have most of my house wired with ethernet, but most of my networked devices are portable. BTW, I recommend the D-Link DIR-868L wireless router - great performance, reliability, and range.

    • by Aereus (1042228)

      Ur, look at this plebeian on his 5G wireless. Ours does 5-- Yeah! 5 *thousand* -- don't question it!

  • I do not have wi-fi, you insensitive clod! I still do not see any way in which wi-fi in my home would improve the quality my life. I have a network cable from my modem to my couch, that if I want to work on the couch with a laptop, I can easily plug in, and it is in no way inconvenient. More over, I do not have to worry about wi-fi security, with is always a bit fidgety.
    • Why Fy? (Score:5, Funny)

      by marienf (140573) on Thursday August 21, 2014 @05:02AM (#47718901) Homepage

      Agree with hooiberg.

      Before we moved in, we had the electricians add Ethernet + Coax all over the place.
      We now enjoy radiation-free hard-to-tap full-duplex high-speed reliiable connections everywhere. The phones are VoIP models and on that same network, so are our laptops. I don't see the point of making a very simple problem complex and unreliable. I don't see the point of Wifi, in short.

      In fact, we went One Step Beyond, shielded our home, and banned all microwave-based devices (except the oven, which is in a well-shielded switched enclosure) from it. Our visitors leave their cell phones etc. in the hallway. A bit like guns in some saloons, back in the days, I guess.

      The quality of our social gatherings has certainly improved as well, with people not looking stressed and preoccupied with checking their little screens and allowing these to interrupt face-to-face conversation, and we enjoy 1uW/m2 throughout the home, just to be on the safe side.

      What's the point of having a mobile device *in the home* in the first place? I certainly don't see it, and while I personally don't use mobile devices at all, I can sort of see how these can be useful while on the road. But in the home.. That's just plain silly.

      -f

  • So, how many 'accidentally' use next door's wifi rather than their own?
    • by Chrisq (894406)

      So, how many 'accidentally' use next door's wifi rather than their own?

      And how many of next-door's devices are on yours?

      • Well I wanted live in a quiet neighborhood and the majority of my retired neighbors fit the stereotype of old people that can't operate a computer... so none.

        I do have a co-worker that lives in an apartment who had his internet messed up when someone accessed the main box to steal cable tv.

  • I thought I wasn't too bad until I started counting them all up..
    • Work laptop,
    • My netbook,
    • My housemate's laptop,
    • My desktop,
    • My work cellphone,
    • My personal cellphone,
    • The PS3,
    • The tv,
    • My hacked PSP,
    • My Kindle,

    and a few more assorted devices that are rarely on such as a Dell Axim, a spare S2 mini cellphone, an old laptop used for VAG-Com connection to the car, and my telescope mount.
    There's a reason why I have 3 SSIDs across 3 channels (1,6,13). I have GigE as well, but it's a rented house so I can't run

  • 2 phones, 2 kindles, 2 hand held game consoles, 2 tablets, 2 laptops, 1 netbook, 1 full size console and 1 TV.
    Damn.
  • Too many. 2 work phones, 2 personal phones, 1 ipad, 1 mac mini, 3 macbooks, 1 pc laptop, 1 dd-wrt router acting as a wireless bridge, 1 ps3, 1 wii, 1 smart TV. I'm sure more will be coming in the future.
  • iPad, iPod, 2x iPhones, Xbox One, PS3, LG SmartTV, iMac, MacMini, Windows Desktop, Bitcoin Mining Computer, that about covers it...
  • Two person home. Two each of cell phones and laptops connected. Two entertainment devices (gaming console and Blu-Ray). I also have another wifi-ready console that I've just never setup for network play. Also one tablet, and one printer. Considering a wifi thermostat.

    That's 8 devices without trying, for two users. That's also not counting "sometimes" devices on the whitelist: work laptop, frequent visitors' phones.

  • In your typical American household with 1.5 parents and 1.5 children, you'll have 1 computer and one phone for each adult and child. That adds up to 3 computers and 3 phones, or 6 devices - and as I type this, "5-6 devices" is just barely beating out the "more than 10" category in the poll.

    /That third computer is a multibooter for sure
    //and the third phone is in and out of jail all the time
  • 2 phones, 2 laptops, 1 desktop, 3 tablets, Roku, Outside camera (via Eye-Fi card), Printer.
  • So many access points, you barely get bandwidth. Cat5e does not have all these issues and it is cheaper and faster as well.

  • more than 20 on ethernet. Why? Security.
  • 2 X Cell Phones
    4 X XBOX
    1 X Wii
    1 X Chormecast
    3 X Computers

    Plus Guests. This reminds me that I ought to upgrade to higher end unit ...

  • Three phones, two tablets, two laptops, a desktop, xbox1, smart tv, android tv box, printer

  • Voted then realized it said "my". Who uses their own when all your neighbors provide it for you?

  • Given how this is supposed to be a community of nerds, I'm surprised at how many people here are proudly stating that they don't even have a wireless router (or they choose not connect anything to it, or they don't even have an internet connection).

    I mean, the whole point of technology is to improve quality of life, right? Sure, I could spend time running cable through the attic and installing panels in the walls... but then I'd have to spend time doing that, and I'd still have unsightly cables running fro

  • This is an old house ( 100 years ) where I simply can't lay ethernet cables everywhere. So my girlfriend, with her laptop, is on WiFi, over a NetGear repeater in a 220V socket in... the bathroom. The rest of the devices which need internet access are on ethernet: the WiFi router is hooked to a 16-port switch ( got it as a gift from the friendly sysadmin when I was kicked out of my last job ), and from there ethernet to my 2 laptops, NAS, workstation and server, all on the patio which is my working place. S
  • 3 Phones
    3 Tablets
    2 Notebooks but wireless use is rare
    1 roku (1 so wifi only)
    1 Xbox 360
    1 Printer (Large format inkjet)

    Wired
    2 R Pi
    1 Custom arduiono compatible head end (acts as a bridge for several low speed wireless networks)
    3 Desktops
    1 Server
    3 Roku
    1 Laser printer

    In total I've got 3 AP's and need 2 more to finish coverage of the house and garage. May add one to a tree fort. One of those AP's and the wired printer are via powerline ethernet as I've not had time to hard wire them.

  • But not all of them are connected at the same time.

    2 phones
    2 tablets
    2 Chumbies (yes, still)
    1 desktop PC
    3 ThinkPads, one in daily use, one being prepped to ship off to my father, one currently only occasional use. I'll get another back from my dad after he switches over to the new one - he's using a loaner from me right now.

    Also connected are a second desktop PC, a Linux desktop/backup server, and a printer/multifunction.

    Christ, no wonder the local power utility tells me my electricity usage is 25% higher th

Sigmund Freud is alleged to have said that in the last analysis the entire field of psychology may reduce to biological electrochemistry.

 



Forgot your password?
Working...