Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
PlayStation (Games) Sony Entertainment Games

Sony Gives Educational Access To PS2/PSP SDKs 41

Posted by Soulskill
from the planting-seeds dept.
Verunks points out that senior manager Mark Danks at the Playstation Blog has announced the availability of PS2 and PSP development kits through college programs. He writes: "PlayStation-edu is a program for universities and colleges to get access to PS2 and PSP development kits ... the same ones that professional developers use to make the games you love to play. You get the development software, the hardware, and the SDK to learn and experiment with. SCEA wants to make sure that students who are graduating from college are ready to program on PlayStation hardware and that means getting it into your hands."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Sony Gives Educational Access To PS2/PSP SDKs

Comments Filter:
  • Why on the PS2 and PSP? is programming for them the same as programming for the PS3?
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by codefrog (302314)
      Yes, the programming techniques for any newer console are derived from the ones used on the last console. Some things get simpler, some things get more complicated. The PS2 and PSP devkits the Sony sells to developers can't be in much demand at this point; it makes perfect sense to convert all those very pricey business assets into some kind of accountable "good will" and at the same time train new developers in the twisted Sony way. Microsoft has a big advantage (in terms of training developers) in that
      • by mdenham (747985)
        Also, though I'm not going to be able to provide attribution (par for the course here) I thought the PS3 devkit was basically "install a PS3-compatible distro of Linux and use gcc"?
        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by rsmith-mac (639075)
          Unfortunately not. For starters, the base PS3 OS isn't Linux. On top of that you can't use the GPU (or rather its framebuffer) when running Linux. The only way to do any kind of real PS3 development is with a SDK. This is the one thing where Microsoft has Sony completely whipped and to a lesser degree Nintendo (their SDK is much cheaper at $2500, though still not dirt cheap by any means).
          • by tepples (727027) <tepples&gmail,com> on Saturday June 07, 2008 @08:51AM (#23692773) Homepage Journal

            This is the one thing where Microsoft has Sony completely whipped and to a lesser degree Nintendo (their SDK is much cheaper at $2500, though still not dirt cheap by any means).
            Microsoft still has the cheapest devkit for education. To any PC from 2006 or later, add Windows (100 USD from OEM), XNA Game Studio (included with Internet access), an Xbox 360 console (350 USD), and a five-year subscription to Creators Club (495 USD).
            • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

              by Anonymous Coward
              Except access to the XNA platform isn't really a "devkit", that's like saying Flash 7 is a devkit for the Wii...
            • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

              by MikeTheGreat (34142)
              For students & teachers, it's even better - the XNA Creators Club subscription is free through their 'DreamSpark' thingee:

              https://downloads.channel8.msdn.com/Products/XNA_Game_Studio.aspx [msdn.com]
              (Looks like 'free for 1 year, then $100/year afterwards' is the official line)
          • Re:PS2? (Score:4, Informative)

            by mdm42 (244204) on Saturday June 07, 2008 @10:27AM (#23693207) Homepage Journal
            The PS3 OS is not based on Linux, but the devkit is. The GPU drivers are unavailable to the general public, but an OpenGL based setup for Linux does exist (it's an NVidia GPU underneath after-all).

            So although development on an ordinary PS3 with Linux is not really possible, the actual devkit is Linux based.
  • is there any greater confirmation of the value of OSS than companies wanting to give you access so you will help them out later?

    Hold on, so the megacorp will 'give' you access so you'll be ready to help them later.... uhm, can we sue them? This is entirely the process of OSS, well sort of. If it is open, people will use it. If you build it, they will come. To me, this validates RMS rather than saying anything about Sony, unless you want to say that maybe they get it now? but huh? They don't get it, they jus
    • uhm, can we sue them?

      What the fuck are we going to sue them for? And how does this have anything to do with OSS? Sony chooses to make money off of developers by selling them devkits. Now that the PS2/PSP devkits aren't worth as much, they're willing to let them go for free. That's how business generally works... when something is worth less, lower the price.

      Maybe I'm missing something, but I can't discern any sort of reason at all why you're suddenly dragging OSS into this. Not to mention... sue them? WTF?

  • Savy profs will be able to ensure their students have adequately covered the course material by building courseware into PS2/PSP games. Instead of reading law at Oxford, perhaps one can play Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer or Computer Architecture at A&M.
    • Savy profs will be able to ensure their students have adequately covered the course material by building courseware into PS2/PSP games. Instead of reading law at Oxford, perhaps one can play Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer or Computer Architecture at A&M.

      Not really. The PS3 makes more sense for that sort of number-crunching work, and there's already Linux distros available to facilitate this on the Cell CPU. For the rest of it, Microsoft has the XNA environment available for the XBox, to enable game/learning-environment development. Indeed, I was enrolled in just such a (postgrad) paper last year. Moreover, none of these options require going through the drama that Sony wanted to impose... and who knows how easy or hard it will be to prove you're an instit

  • More info on PS-edu (Score:3, Informative)

    by mdanks (75908) on Saturday June 07, 2008 @02:20PM (#23694659) Homepage
    There seem to be two common questions about the program.

    1) Why not PS3?

        The PS3 is a complex box to program for and the amount of knowledge which a student would get in a semester actually wouldn't be that much. The goal of the program is to help teach students about the low levels of the hardware...regardless of the platform. The PS2 is a very good teaching tool for this. I have seen too many students graduate who think that they can program "the metal" only knowing C# and Java. They don't know anything about DMA, registers, bus contention, instruction latency, etc.

    2) What about indie games?

        Again, the goal of ps-edu is instructional. However, I am in close contact with Sony World Wide Studios, so if a student creates a great game, I can easily put them in touch with WWS.

    Mark
  • In all honesty, I think this is a very interesting program, and if there are any profs out there who actually use it, it will be a boon to students and the industry.

    However, I wanted to point out something that no one has mentioned yet (oddly):

    Of course, there are a couple caveats (aren't there always?): Yes, your school will need to sign some legal agreements with us and yes, "get access to" means that your school will need to purchase the hardware.

    For the record, no, there aren't always caveats. While the

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by mdanks (75908)
      Actually, no. Universities have never been able to purchase the hardware. Previously, only licensed developers were able to get the hardware.

      While I would love to give away the hardware for free, that would be like MS giving a retail 360 with every copy of XNA. Trust me, SCEA isn't making a profit on the dev kits :-)

      Mark
      • by dj_tla (1048764) *
        Cheers for that, interesting to know. Can you give any details on the legal agreements? In particular, do students retain ownership of the code they create, to the extent that they can license it however they choose?
        • by mdanks (75908)
          It actually depends on the school. SCEA doesn't have any ownership over the IP. If the school lets the students own it, then great. If the school says that it gets the IP, then okay.

          Mark

"When it comes to humility, I'm the greatest." -- Bullwinkle Moose

Working...