Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Media Programming

Django 1.0 Released 104

Posted by timothy
from the by-djove-they've-done-it dept.
jgomo3 writes "Finally, the stable version 1.0 of Django (one of the most popular free Python based frameworks) has been released. Explained in the project blog, this achievement was in part due to the great users and developers community of the Django project, and recall the big effort with numbers like 4000 commits and 2000 bugs fixed since last stable version. Django is 'The Web framework for perfectionists with deadlines.' You can dive in by reading the overview."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Django 1.0 Released

Comments Filter:
  • yay (Score:5, Informative)

    by story645 (1278106) * <story645@gmail.com> on Friday September 05, 2008 @12:02AM (#24883851) Journal

    I just started playing with Django today, so I'm mostly just thrilled that the absolutely awesome tutorials still work. This is one of the most newbie friendly things I've ever worked with, in large part 'cause it's got awesome documentation and very clear tutorials and logically named well almost everything. (Plus it produces pretty and friendly sites.) I may not be as hyper about it once I start trying to use it for a real project, but it getting to a stable release is promising.

  • Django Sites (Score:3, Informative)

    by rmansuri (1190437) on Friday September 05, 2008 @04:19AM (#24885315)
    Well done to all who work hard for this !!!! Job done !! umm or i can say Job Started !! Have look at most comprehensive listing of websites that are powered by Django, the python web framework for perfectionists with deadlines.

    www.djangosites.org [djangosites.org]
  • Re:The in-factor... (Score:5, Informative)

    by Fweeky (41046) on Friday September 05, 2008 @04:41AM (#24885441) Homepage

    It's too bad everyone and their dog are excited about Ruby on Rails, when a great platform like Django is out there as well.

    Even in the Ruby world, it's too bad Rails gets most of the attention; a lot of people would probably be better off with one of the many more lightweight frameworks there, or even no framework at all (really, your 3 page website needs an 80kLOC framework to support it?). So many people hyperfocus on one system and miss out on all the other ways of doing things; Nitro, Merb, Sanatra, Ramaze, even writing your own handlers in Rack. Given the size, complexity and overhead of these things, it'd really make more sense for people to start from the bottom (Rack) and work their way up, not the other way around.

    Python wise this probably means starting by writing your own WSGI [wikipedia.org] handlers, rather than starting with a huge framework to write Hello World in.

    on the whole Python indentation=block thing... It's not perfect, but only use spaces and it won't be a problem.

    Blegh, use tabs properly and it won't be a problem either. It's shocking how people can't even get a trivial thing like that right, though, is it really that difficult to configure your editor not to mix the two? Hint: Set your editor to highlight leading whitespace, doing tabs and spaces differently, then you'll never be surprised by either. I'll get you started:

    highlight LeadingTab ctermbg=blue guibg=blue
    highlight LeadingSpace ctermbg=darkgreen guibg=darkgreen
    highlight EvilSpace ctermbg=darkred guibg=darkred
    au Syntax * syn match LeadingTab /^\t\+/
    au Syntax * syn match LeadingSpace /^\ \+/
    au Syntax * syn match EvilSpace /[^\t]\+\zs\t\+/ " tabs not preceeded by tabs are never acceptable
    au Syntax * syn match EvilSpace /\zs\ \+$/ " trailing space is silly

    There, now you have no excuse. Well, except the first EvilSpace match broke at some point, anyone see why?

  • Re:The in-factor... (Score:3, Informative)

    by Max Romantschuk (132276) <max@romantschuk.fi> on Friday September 05, 2008 @05:18AM (#24885637) Homepage

    on the whole Python indentation=block thing... It's not perfect, but only use spaces and it won't be a problem.

    Blegh, use tabs properly and it won't be a problem either. It's shocking how people can't even get a trivial thing like that right, though, is it really that difficult to configure your editor not to mix the two? Hint: Set your editor to highlight leading whitespace, doing tabs and spaces differently, then you'll never be surprised by either.

    Anyone who has ever worked in a larger organization will know that it's impossible to get people to configure their software identically, unless we're forcing every one.

    Also, a lot of people aren't that smart anyway...

    That's why I advocate spaces only: There is a single way to render a single space, so the margin for error is smaller. :)

  • Re:Great work (Score:3, Informative)

    by Bogtha (906264) on Friday September 05, 2008 @05:59AM (#24885799)

    well, if they were smart, they'd have used Jython to run Django on the JVM.

    Django already runs on Jython. [python.org]

  • by GrievousMistake (880829) on Friday September 05, 2008 @01:19PM (#24890291)

    I'd recommend 4-space indents for Python, it's what the standard library uses, and what anyone who wants to use something 'standard', like any large project, will be using as well. One reason the tab/space things isn't a problem is that the language comes with a clear recommendation.
    I still use tabs for everything else, so I've added to my .vimrc:
    autocmd FileType python set et ts=4 sw=4 sts=4

  • by DragonWriter (970822) on Friday September 05, 2008 @02:56PM (#24891801)

    PHP is nice example. It had advantage in allowing having business logic directly in HTML pages (i.e. easy creation of dynamic pages compared to CGI), and was free. But there was a disadvantage to this approach, so the MVC model and frameworks using templates were invented.

    Yes, the Model-View-Controller model was invented to deal with problems identified in PHP-based webapps. The amazing part of this is that MVC was first described in 1979, and PHP wasn't invented until 1995, so clearly there was considerable time travel involved.

  • Re:The in-factor... (Score:3, Informative)

    by Daimaou (97573) on Saturday September 06, 2008 @06:51AM (#24899377)

    I jumped on the Rails bandwagon for a bit, but I jumped back off after finding Django.

    I think Django has several advantages over Rails. It runs faster, is better organized, and is easier. I also like how Django limits the functionality of templates in order to force your logic into the controller, which is where it belongs.

    The only thing that bugs me about Django really is that they call the controller the view, and the view the template; which is mildly confusing at first.

The only thing cheaper than hardware is talk.

Working...