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Microsoft's New Programming Language, "M" 334

Posted by timothy
from the well-it-sounds-delicious dept.
Anthony_Cargile writes "Microsoft announced Friday their new 'M' language, designed especially for building textual domain-specific languages and software models with XAML. Microsoft will also announce Quadrant, for building and viewing models visually, and a repository for storing and combining models using a SQL Server database. While some say the language is simply their 'D' language renamed to a further letter down the alphabet, the language is criticized for lack of a promised cross-platform function because of its ties to MS SQL server, which only runs on Windows."
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Microsoft's New Programming Language, "M"

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  • lame (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 11, 2008 @06:56PM (#25342173)

    great. another language to learn that is completely useless and no one will use.. And I'm not trolling, this glut of languages is fucking ridiculous. Why not clean up the fucking dotnet framework reference dlls?

    • Re:lame (Score:5, Funny)

      by LEMONedIScream (1111839) <<lemonjellly> <at> <gmail.com>> on Saturday October 11, 2008 @07:59PM (#25342501)
      If you're not trolling, why post AC? Hell, why I am I responding?
    • Re:lame (Score:5, Interesting)

      by berwiki (989827) on Saturday October 11, 2008 @08:03PM (#25342527)
      which parts need cleaned up?
      they are all pretty consistent across the board.

      and who cares how many languages there are. each one fits a different purpose, whether they are small niches or big sweeping frameworks like Java, does it really bother you that someone, somewhere just went 'yes, this is perfect for me'?
      • Re:lame (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Spiked_Three (626260) on Saturday October 11, 2008 @09:48PM (#25343021)
        There was a lot of new tech in the last couple of .net releases - and unfortunately they are all not in sync at all.

        It's no big deal, anytime that much new comes out in so many areas it takes a while to get them synced, but it's a little chaotic now.

        Specifically; new GUI paradigm (XAML/WPF/Silverlight) and new Data Access (LINQ) - the standard collections don't have INotifyPropertyChange support across the board, SortedCollections are hit and miss, just in general I have found that interfaces needed for one new component is not well implemented for other new components. Like I said, just a bit of growing pains, but it needs attention.

        But I'll agree it has nothing to do with a new language being introduced. I doubt if that will have any affect one way or the other.
        • Re:lame (Score:4, Interesting)

          by batkiwi (137781) on Saturday October 11, 2008 @10:27PM (#25343195)

          You hit on some, but don't forget that generics have been in since dotnet 2.0 and we STILL do not have generics for reflection, data-tables, or many other standard pieces of the API which still require the use of explicit casting.

          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by CodeBuster (516420)

            we STILL do not have generics for reflection

            I use generics and reflection together all of the time, what do you mean that we don't have generics for reflection? The Activator class includes generics support for CreateInstance and there is a MakeGenericType method for making generic types among other things. Could it be better? I don't know maybe possibly, it depends upon what you want and how you define better in context. As for data-tables who actually uses raw data-tables straight up in a serious production application? If you need data persistence

      • Re:lame (Score:5, Insightful)

        by darkpixel2k (623900) <aaron@heyaaron.com> on Saturday October 11, 2008 @10:27PM (#25343193) Homepage

        does it really bother you that someone, somewhere just went 'yes, this is perfect for me'?

        Yeah--because they are probably wrong.
        My company gets all the Microsoft development tools for free.

        With those tools, we build things like Contact management systems, inventory applications, and websites.

        We then turn around and sell them to customers. Customers love the price, but then later realize that they must buy a server to run in on, a copy of Windows, a server to run SQL on, a copy of Microsoft SQL Server, licenses, licenses to allow 'anonymous' internet connections, copies of Microsoft Office 2007 to be able to read the reports it spits out in Word 2007 format, etc...

        ...and the price balloons by thousands of dollars.

        When I develop applications, I don't go looking for the tools that make my life the easiest--I go looking for the tools that will make the end-user's life easier. I develop in languages that work across multiple platforms (except for the abomination that is Java).

        Microsoft tools are awesome if you're a developer. They make pumping out applications and websites easy...unless you want to use non-microsoft technologies...or want to save money...or have one of those stubborn Mac users that won't switch to windows ;)

        In other words, if you want to be locked into using and paying extortionate fees for Microsoft technologies until the end of time, go ahead. Use Visual Studio. Otherwise, look elsewhere.

        • Re:lame (Score:5, Interesting)

          by HangingChad (677530) on Saturday October 11, 2008 @11:25PM (#25343419) Homepage

          Yeah--because they are probably wrong.

          They are wrong. The last thing we need is another programming language tied to a specific platform.

          We then turn around and sell them to customers. Customers love the price, but then later realize that they must buy a server to run in on, a copy of Windows, a server to run SQL on, a copy of Microsoft SQL Server, licenses, licenses to allow 'anonymous' internet connections, copies of Microsoft Office 2007 to be able to read the reports it spits out in Word 2007 format, etc...

          Exactly why we opted out of the whole Microsoft environment, at least on the server and desktop side of the house. We have a couple Windows clients floating around with the sales staff but those are laptops that came with it.

          Instead of constantly serving the MS machine, we can focus on working. If we need capacity, we just stand it up. New servers go in for the cost of the hardware. I don't consider myself stubborn, just practical. I'd rather focus on work than spend time keeping up the MS all-singing, all-dancing, constantly changing development environment. All the time you spend keeping up on security patches, learning new languages, hunting through the knowledge base, re-writing stuff the new framework broke...it's just nuts. You'd be amazed how productive you can be when you strip all the MS process out of your environment.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by db32 (862117)
        Ok...lets examine this for a moment because I keep hearing this and it is patently stupid. I am ok with a good selection of languages for a variety of tasks, but "who cares how many languages" is stupid.

        Lets fast forward a bit more. Now we have a huge variety of redundanat languages in use. Now we have two major problems.

        1. Finding a job gets very very difficult. I already have seen jobs asking for 10 years experience in things that haven't been around for 10 years. Adding an alphabet soup worth o
    • Re:lame (Score:5, Funny)

      by The Redster! (874352) on Saturday October 11, 2008 @08:13PM (#25342559)
      New Entry-level opportunity for a young, seasoned programmer in a fast-paced environment. Must have:

      2 Years MS-SQL experience
      3 Years in "M", 5 preferred
      Pay negotiable.
    • They did (Score:5, Funny)

      by Weaselmancer (533834) on Saturday October 11, 2008 @09:13PM (#25342877)

      Why not clean up the fucking dotnet framework reference dlls?

      You can download them here. [sun.com]

    • Re:lame (Score:4, Insightful)

      by encoderer (1060616) on Saturday October 11, 2008 @09:18PM (#25342911)

      You are trolling. If you weren't you'd have no need to try to disclaim it.

      There's no such thing as too many languages.

      From a programmers perspective the more the market fragments the more opportunity for specialized knowledge that increases your market value.

      And it seems you don't really understand the idea of M. This is not a general purpose language.

      So your post is like saying "iPod? Great. Another computer to buy that is useless and no one will use. This glut of computers is fucking ridiculous. Why not make x86 boot quickly instead?"

      The iPod is a specialized computer for a specialized task. Just like M.

      • Re:lame (Score:5, Insightful)

        by darkpixel2k (623900) <aaron@heyaaron.com> on Saturday October 11, 2008 @10:30PM (#25343205) Homepage

        The iPod is a specialized computer for a specialized task. Just like M.

        Yeah.
        M helps you reach your goal of being completely locking in your company to Microsoft products.
        The iPod just plays music.

        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Apathist (741707)

          The iPod just plays music

          Yeah, right. And how do you get that music onto the iPod? Oh yeah, you need to install iTunes (which is terrible software, btw)... and what is iTunes except a foot in the door for the whole Apple(tm) lifestyle?

          Yeah, I can see how that is totally different to getting locked into Microsoft products.

    • by Blakey Rat (99501)

      If you don't like it, just don't use it.

      If you don't like Microsoft, you could be cheering that they wasted all their money developing this "completely useless" language that "no one will use."

      But seriously, I don't know why the concept of "if you don't like it, just don't use it" is so goddamned hard for people. Microsoft's not forcing it on you, you know.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by poolmeister (872753)
      Let's not forget the additional confusion caused by this as MUMPS [wikipedia.org] is a language that has been around since the late 1960s and is also referred to as M [wikipedia.org]
  • by overshoot (39700) on Saturday October 11, 2008 @06:57PM (#25342181)

    While some say the language is simply their 'D' language renamed to a further letter down the alphabet, the language is criticized for lack of a promised cross-platform function because of its ties to MS SQL server, which only runs on Windows."

    That's not a bug, that's a feature.

  • Not the current D (Score:5, Informative)

    by PhrostyMcByte (589271) <phrosty@gmail.com> on Saturday October 11, 2008 @06:58PM (#25342191) Homepage
    So apparently Microsoft tried to make their own "D" long ago and failed. It's not talking about the current D from Digital Mars. The article had me confused for a few minutes there.
  • Story Mirror (Score:2, Informative)

    From thecoffeedesk.com:

    In a software-centric world where we already have many, many languages to program in, from scripting to bytecode compiled languages, to frameworks on top of languages and embedded languages, now Redmond wants to bring ANOTHER language to the table, titled âMâ(TM) (for Microsoft?).

    The new language is to be a part of Microsoftâ(TM)s new Oslo development and service-oriented strategy, incorporating features from XAML while being textual and domain-specific. M is to b
  • by zappepcs (820751) on Saturday October 11, 2008 @07:00PM (#25342201) Journal

    is the sound of a company dieing ... seriously. Yes, there will be those that call this post a troll, but look at the facts. What new product has MS announced that was not met with criticism and derision? What have they done in the last 5 years that improved the personal computing world? World leaders they no longer are. The MS way of doing things is no longer the ONLY way to do things.

    The more they try to launch products which are locked into their own ecosystem, the more people laugh. There are entire countries that have rejected MS products, never mind the users who do so on their own. When entire countries and industries reject your products you have a serious problem. MS has not and is not addressing that problem. They seem to be blindly going down the same road that led to this situation without concern for how they will make money in the next decade.

    It amounts to basically a rotting corpse on the sidewalk with a beggars cup held out. That is just my opinion, and it stems from the lack of anything good or beneficial coming from MS. YMMV

    • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 11, 2008 @07:07PM (#25342243)

      Well, to be fair, a lot of organizations and governments that have "rejected" Microsoft products did so only to win a better deal. Some have managed to go with Linux or some other OS, but most have ended up back in Microsoft's hands (albeit with a substantial discount.)

      Ha ... captcha is "pathetic."

    • by mindstormpt (728974) on Saturday October 11, 2008 @07:10PM (#25342263) Homepage

      is the sound of a company dieing ... seriously. Yes, there will be those that call this post a troll, but look at the facts. What new product has MS announced that was not met with criticism and derision? What have they done in the last 5 years that improved the personal computing world?

      Windows Home Server actually received pretty good reviews, and it can be considered an improvement (mainly in the ease of use) on the current (non-geek) home server scene - the non-existing one that is. I haven't had a chance to try it yet, but I'm looking forward to it (and no, I'm not a fanboy, I actually run 3 servers at home: windows, linux and freebsd).

      Then there's Microsoft Research, which actually comes up with some great stuff, though most of it is not (yet) implementable on a commercial scale.

      So I'll call your post a troll. That's just my opinion too.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by LingNoi (1066278)

        As soon as I read "windows home server" my first thought was all the bad press about the file corruption [wikipedia.org] problems and tbh that's one of the worse things that could happen, to loose all your family photos.

      • Microsoft's home server was an interesting little blit.

        Instead I set up at home a DRBL server with the LTSP option. It was more work, but it has some advantages:

        • My files aren't corrupted
        • my server's not vulnerable to any known virus
        • good backup software is included
        • Every PC can network boot to a server desktop. We often have the family kids over, and this is more handy than standing over them making sure they're not downloading malware to an XP PC.
        • The net cost was some of my time. Since I enjoyed it,
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by pieisgood (841871)
      I don't know about you, but I would consider the Xbox 360 a rather large success for Microsoft. The 360 game pad? Best, in my opinion, on any system. Windows XP? Seems to be doing fairly well from my perspective. Adobe creating new products that give Windows an advantage over OSX because of hardware compatibility and support? That seems to be good for Microsoft. Certainly, Microsoft isn't doing them selves any favors, not until windows 7 is released with actual improvements. But, Software developers are de
      • by MBCook (132727) <foobarsoft@foobarsoft.com> on Saturday October 11, 2008 @07:46PM (#25342443) Homepage

        The 360 game pad really is very nice, but the D-pad is horrid. They need to improve it.

        All said, I think MS is a pretty good company that has a ton of promise. The problem is they need to be broken up. They're like Sony was a few years ago (things have improved, a little)... they have no direction.

        MS already have enough of their own languages (VB.net and C#), as well as others coming soon (F#), a shell they're inventing (PowerShell / Monad). They have interesting research products but they don't tend to make it to consumers most of the time.

        MS has too much money to throw at projects like this that probably aren't that necessary. Some products linger around for years without enough help (Windows XP), many are constantly delayed (Vista was, we'll see it again). If the Mac Business Unit didn't release something named Office, you'd never know it was related to the "real" Office because the release schedules are so incredibly far apart.

        If MS were split into a few little companies (maybe all under one big umbrella company) that could really make 'em fight against each other to prove how good they are, I think they could seriously improve their image.

        I don't think Microsoft will last in it's current form. Something will have to change. A major strategy shift, a giant re-org, a slice across the product line (was having 7 different versions of Vista really a good idea?). Something will happen.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      is the sound of a company dieing ... seriously. Yes, there will be those that call this post a troll, but look at the facts. What new product has MS announced that was not met with criticism and derision? What have they done in the last 5 years that improved the personal computing world? World leaders they no longer are. The MS way of doing things is no longer the ONLY way to do things.

      OK I'll bite, yes you are nothing but a troll. There market dominance is increasing in the server space and so is their profitability. Trolls like you only look at the bad stuff which any company that releases dozens of products a year will have, it is part of the business model. Hell their are still trolls that tout Vista as a failure even though it has 10 times the market share of OS.X and a 100 times the market share of desktop linux and makes them BILLIONS.

      recent stuff that doesn't suck and is making th

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Malevolyn (776946)

        Hell their are still trolls that tout Vista as a failure even though it has 10 times the market share of OS.X and a 100 times the market share of desktop linux and makes them BILLIONS.

        Market share != quality.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by westlake (615356)
          Market share != quality.
          .

          Market share = survival.

          Microsoft's bread & butter is the home and office workhorse.

          The Windows PC that can run damn near every client-side app on the planet - including the marquee products of free and open source.

          For the server room there is Exchange and SharePoint and...pretty much everything else you might need or want for a small to mid-sized business.

      • by compro01 (777531)

        I'd contest the 360's place on that list. The failure rate has got to be hurting them, not to mention I'm pretty sure they sell the box itself at a loss and try to make it up on the games.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Raenex (947668)

      is the sound of a company dieing

      Oh, my eyes. It's spelled dying.

      • by X0563511 (793323)

        dieing. dieing. Dieing. DIEING!

        Are your eyes damaged yet? No?

        DIEING! DIEING! DIEING!

        How about now? Good! No more spelling trolls for you. Hard to check spelling when you can't see.

        -----------

        Did I make it clear how much of a fool you are making yourself look?

        • by Raenex (947668)

          Did I make it clear how much of a fool you are making yourself look?

          No, try harder.

          • by X0563511 (793323)

            No. I'll play the part of a fool, and reply to a troll as above. But I will not become one completely and humor you further.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by mikael (484)

      What have they done in the last 5 years that improved the personal computing world? World leaders they no longer are. The MS way of doing things is no longer the ONLY way to do things.

      That is the main Microsoft strategy of dominating any field in the computer industry. With any established field in the computer industry, there are experienced veterans who will be reluctant to switch over to Microsoft products simple because Microsoft tells them to.

      The solution is to create a "hive mind" culture where the co

    • But their revenue is still increasing, and they still have a stranglehold on the majority of the market.

    • by DavidD_CA (750156)

      Off the top of my head, from a non-geek (consumer) point of view in terms of sales and/or non-experience and buzz:

      • X-Box 360
      • Office 2007
      • Groove
      • Photosynth

      And from a geek perspective:

      • Exchange Server 2007
      • Windows Server 2008
      • IE 8
      • Silverlight
      • Expression

      And frankly, you can piss on Vista all you want, but I have yet to actually talk to a non-geek that's running Vista who doesn't like it.

    • What new product has MS announced that was not met with criticism and derision?

      That's one of the problems of reading Slashdot and related sites a lot. But I don't blame you. You can see a similar "imaginary world" skewed perspectives from people watching FOX News alot.

      As for the rest of us, developer tools, language design, is one of the areas where Microsoft unquestionable excels. And this article is incidentally about release in that area.

      • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

        by BhaKi (1316335)

        As for the rest of us, developer tools, language design, is one of the areas where Microsoft unquestionable excels.

        Language design?? Wait. I don't seem to be able to recall when was the last time ms DEFINED a language PROPERLY so that someone could write a compiler for it. Perhaps you could enlighten me.

    • by Sentry21 (8183)

      There's definitely a point here. It seems like people are fleeing the lock-in inherent in Microsoft's products, and Microsoft's reaction to that is to try and make products to lure people back into the lock-in, rather than make products that don't have it.

      It reminds me of my cell carrier. They have a 'feature' which sends you a text message when you miss a call, which is bundled with Visual Voicemail and caller ID. The problem is that it's annoying, often hours behind reality, and no one wants it. In fact,

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by willyhill (965620)

      Seems to me that whatever Microsoft introduces or announces is met with criticism and derision simply because people are predisposed to do that, especially around here.

      I seem to remember C# and the .NET framework were met with criticism and derision eight years ago (I'm not a developer but I've followed the dev space for years because my job used to involve dealing with those technologies anyway). Not much criticism and derision now, is there?

      More to the point, where exactly is all this criticism and derisi

    • by westlake (615356)
      That sound you hear is the sound of a company dieing...seriously
      .

      Firefox has a built-in spell checker. Seriously.

      MS is the first U.S. industrial company in ten years to get a AAA credit rating from S&P and Moody's. It's a damn short list these days.

      If your company's bonds are rated "below investment grade" - aka "junk" - and the odds are 7 in 10 that they are - then you are the one who is looking death in the face, not Microsoft.

  • what Bond would say about this [wikipedia.org].

  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday October 11, 2008 @07:05PM (#25342227)

    TFA was low on info and high on bias. The Register article is a little better. I couldn't quickly find any Microsoft release on the matter:

    The Register [theregister.co.uk]

    • TFA wasn't a FA (Score:2, Informative)

      by Bill Dog (726542)

      Thanks for the link, that was a much better article. But most Slashdotters will prefer the less informative, more biased original chosen for featuring here. In fact, you can find way better articles just googling "programming language m oslo quadrant" than the blog post featured here. But his blog does have a neat look.

  • by kcokane (253536) on Saturday October 11, 2008 @07:06PM (#25342237) Homepage

    The Mumps Language was re-designated as the M language a number of
    years ago. While Mumps isn't as widely used as some others, perhaps
    the people in Redmond should do a literature search before they
    name things.

    see:

    http://math-cs.cns.uni.edu/~okane/mumps.html [uni.edu]
    http://www.cs.uni.edu/~okane/ [uni.edu]

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by kcokane (253536)

      see also:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MUMPS [wikipedia.org]

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by bill_mcgonigle (4333) *

      Not being on my regular computer, I'm seeing ads today and the delicious irony is that Intersystems is paying for Cache' ads on this story (Cache' is the dominant commercial implementation of M used in about half the hospitals in the US).

      I had heard Microsoft was going after the healthcare market but I didn't realize they were going to do it by exhausting Intersystems' ad budget on irrelevant stories.

      Also not being on my regular computer I have no idea the keybinding for an accented e....

  • So, M is for Microsoft.

    But what can they possibly do after M? The language I, and then back to C, followed by R?

  • by martinde (137088) on Saturday October 11, 2008 @07:30PM (#25342383) Homepage

    And it's been taken [wikipedia.org] since 1984.

  • by giorgist (1208992)
    Why not "F", that is what we gave Vista

    G
    • by cdrudge (68377)

      I understand your attempt at humor, but they already have a "F" language, F#.

  • Too bad my version of WGA thinks I'm a thief.

    I'll code programs for Linux/Mac/Web in an open language thankyou very much.

    Enjoy.

  • I didn't RTFM, as I can't bring myself to care about a new programming language proposed by Microsoft, but I am buoyed by the fact that the new language begins with something other than the letter "X". In fact, I feel that this letter has been so overused that it should be officially deprecated by the W3C. Obviously, we have to "grandfather" existing X foo; renaming "XML" to "EKSML", "XSLT" to "EKSLT", and so forth would merely result in a much more valuable resource—the letter E—becoming raddle

  • by dpbsmith (263124) on Saturday October 11, 2008 @08:41PM (#25342711) Homepage

    ...for decades. It has been an official alternate name for MUMPS, ANSI standard X11.1, since 1995, while MUMPS itself goes back to 1966. It has been available for virtually every important platform, including but certainly not limited to Windows, for decades. I believe it is still the programming language used by the Veterans Administration. It is the foundation of Intersystem's corporations Cache development platform, and a (much-modified) form of it underlies the product line of Medical Information Technology (Meditech).

    Meditech's revenues are something in the range of $350 million, Intersystems' were about $140 million in 2003. That ain't Microsoft but that ain't hay, either.

    Regardless of what the legal rights and wrongs might be--I'm not sure whether the ISO and ANSI standards are still current--it just arrogant and tacky and lame for Microsoft to have appropriated this well-established, decades-old language name, particularly when they're so pugnacious about defending their own rights to an ordinary English plural noun.

    • I think anyone who wants to establish exclusive rights to a name with only one letter shouldn't be surprised when someone else uses it. In any case, MUMPS couldn't be confused with any language created in the last 20 years.

  • My name is Bond, Crash Bond, with licence to kill you... and i will use for that this brand new blue screen that M gave me.
  • When will everybody figure out that Microsoft has one strategy, one plan, one idea only: LOCK-IN. That's the Alpha and Omega, folks.

    Gates' 3rd grade report card: "Does not play nicely with other children. Claimed to have earned $98,126 during the school year by 'monetizing' student notebooks but we decided not to investigate after William installed a new refrigerator and jacuzzi in the staff room. We hope your son will be with us for Grade 4!"

  • The grand plan (Score:2, Interesting)

    by synthespian (563437)

    M - the M language
    I - Iron Python for .NET
    C - C#
    R - R# coming soon...
    O - O# coming soon...
    S - Silverlight
    O - O# see above
    F - F# right here, right now
    T - T# real soon now...

  • The M language was standardized under that name around 1993 - 1995. Prior to that the language was known as MUMPS, which is an acronym for Massachusetts (General Hospital) Utility Muli Programming System, and goes back to 1967. Which makes it older than Unix. It is a language designed primarily for hospital related work. The US Veterans Administration was an early adopter, and has done a lot to promote MUMPS/M development.

    I don't know what it is with Microsoft, but they keep stealing names that have been

  • by Stan Vassilev (939229) on Saturday October 11, 2008 @09:21PM (#25342933)

    Oslo and M appear to be taking a page out of the research Charles Simonyi has been doing at Microsoft, before leading to develop and advanced form of the technology at his own company Intentional Software [intentsoft.com].

    The basic idea here is that any bigger project can be made more maintainable and flexible at the same time, if the deveopers create a domain specific model for the given task, and let the end-users (for example accountants, drug store chemists, biologists, business owners) model the concrete behaviour of the application by manipulating that simplified and specialized language, often visually, the way an UML diagram or a spreadsheet works.

    Unfortunately the linked article offers a little more than the usual "LOL, Microsoft sucks!" rant, which is somewhat expected from a blog where the iMac keyboard and iPhone are used as "design elements".

    Anyway, I'd say this should be watched as it can mean model languages will finally enter mainstream, something that's been years in the making.

    Related articles:

    http://blogs.msdn.com/wenlong/archive/2008/09/07/net-4-0-wf-wcf-and-oslo.aspx [msdn.com]

    "By mentioning model-driven programming, you will see a general modeling platform to be unveiled at PDC: Oslo. As Doug said, Oslo contains three simple things: a visual tool helps building models, a new textual DSL language helps defining models, and a relational repository that stores models. XAML represented workflows and services are special models in this domain. Check for more details in the postings from Doug and Don."

    http://blogs.zdnet.com/microsoft/?p=1430 [zdnet.com]

    "'Schemas in the repository can be defined using this language, but they dont have to be,' Chappell said. Developers can still use any other tools with which theyd be comfortable to create schemas instead. Because the new language will generate SQL, and the repository can be accessed using standard SQL, no special languages will be required."

  • Is Microsoft going to implement MUMPS [wikipedia.org], s database-driven programming language which was renamed to M to avoid using the trademark from Mass General Hospital from which MUMPS was originated, or in the alternative is this yet another case of Microsoft co-opting a name that was already in use by someone else and figuring, if they can't get away with it, they can buy their way (or maybe not even have to buy, as has been noted in this thread) out of it, like when they used the name "Internet Explorer" for their

  • The correct name is D+=9, or alternatively, D|=9, which is a rather nice coincidence for those of us that care about such things.

  • Then the face of Desmond Wilkinson Llewelyn [wikipedia.org] or John de Lancie [wikipedia.org] could go along with their marketing campaign!
  • So they've gone from C-sharp/D-flat to just humming? Well, the learning curve is flatter.
  • by Not The Real Me (538784) on Sunday October 12, 2008 @09:15PM (#25349675)

    "...the language is criticized for lack of a promised cross-platform function because of its ties to MS SQL server, which only runs on Windows..."

    At one time Sybase and SQL Server used to be compatible. I would use MS SQL Server ODBC drivers to connect to Sybase running on *nix systems. I would also use the open source TDS software from http://www.freetds.org/ [freetds.org] software to allow *nix machines to pull data from SQL Server running on Windows machines. Granted MS and Sybase seem to have forked the TDS protocol which both databases use.

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