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KDE GUI Programming IT Technology

KDevelop4 Beta 3 Released 59

Posted by timothy
from the grind-your-own-gears dept.
mikesd81 writes "KDE announced on May 30th the third public beta of KDevelop4. Some new features include a new code-writing assistant, a new documentation plugin showing you the API docs for Qt and KDE APIs, a reworked Mercurial plugin, and a rewrite of the classbrowser plugin. Two plugins from the KDevelop source, QMake support and Qt Designer integration, were let go and moved to the KDE Playground area."
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KDevelop4 Beta 3 Released

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday June 02, 2009 @12:48PM (#28184183)

    I already have a code assistant, he's called Intern 1.0, he does all the shit work I don't want to do, and when I don't know how to do something, he figures it out, lays out the algorithm for me, and then I take the credit.

    Since he doesn't have a family or girlfriend, he also works about twice the number of hours I do.

    I don't see how KDevelop can improve on that.

  • Fantastic (Score:4, Interesting)

    by 12357bd (686909) on Tuesday June 02, 2009 @12:49PM (#28184187)

    Maybe the best free C/C++ IDE. For other languages old & true Netbeans or Eclipse without a doubt, but for C and C++, it's the only one me.

    Thanks!

  • kdevelop is great (Score:4, Interesting)

    by iplayfast (166447) on Tuesday June 02, 2009 @01:01PM (#28184355)

    Last week when everyone was talking about their favorite ide's I kept thinking that kdevelop should have this or has that.

    It's the one IDE that I've used for Linux development (besides vi) that I've used for years. I'm looking forward to the new class browser.

  • How does it handle display of STL containers in the debugger view?
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Why can't I stuff auto_ptr's into STL objects? I always get leaks.

    • How does it handle display of STL containers in the debugger view?

      I don't know, but isn't GDB supposed to be adding a pretty-print plugin system so that people can write pretty-printers for various STL containers, etc.?

      Maybe once GDB supports that, KDevelop will inherit that functionality for free?

  • Watcom C++ (Score:3, Interesting)

    by moon3 (1530265) on Tuesday June 02, 2009 @01:25PM (#28184723)
    I love KDevelop/GCC, but it is also nice to have some options. The massive reliance on GCC is becoming tiresome, especially if it still under performs, newest Intel's and Microsoft compilers are faster and produce better code..

    The good old Watcom was rock solid compiler producing one of the best binaries at the time, also comes with good debugger and even decent IDE. It is open source now, see www.openwatcom.org [openwatcom.org]. It has a stellar source base and potential to spawn another cross platform compiler to compete with GCC. It would be nice if we could swap GCC for something else.. This great and promising project needs developers badly!

    Do not forget, it is Watcom that compiled and gave us Duke Nukem, Doom, Termial Velocity, Frontier and all the DOS4GW titles.
    • by EzInKy (115248)

      Having nearly completely forgotten about Open Watcom since I first heard about it years ago I was quite eager to see how far the project had come. Unfortunately, even though I did find a page with developer documentation for different processors, I had trouble discerning which architectures the compiler currently supports. The few pdfs I downloaded seem to indicate that it is pretty much limited to 16 and 32 bit x86. Is this actually the case?
       

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by ardor (673957)

      Intel's icc is a collection of special cases. If your code does not fit into this grid of special cases, it will be slow.
      Your actual answer is called LLVM [llvm.org].

      • by sketerpot (454020)
        If you'd like an actual C/C++ compiler that uses LLVM, try either llvm-gcc or Clang [llvm.org], which is probably going to be a serious competitor to gcc in a year or two.
    • Re:Watcom C++ (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Rob Riggs (6418) on Tuesday June 02, 2009 @02:56PM (#28186005) Homepage Journal
      Yes, when Intel and MSFT make compilers that target UltraSPARC, Itanic, and POWER (all, not some) then I'll have a look-see again.

      Open Watcom enjoys virtually no support. It is not going anywhere. It's another sucky piece of code that was no longer competitive in the marketplace. It needs developers like a fish needs a bicycle. No one in their right mind would waste time adding support for this compiler to KDevelop.

      You know, the only people that I know that seriously dislike GCC are the commercial compiler venders. It's not perfect, but it has a major advantage that no other compiler has -- it frees the developer from worrying about vendor specific compiler issues when writing cross-platform code. One less thing to worry about.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Kjella (173770)

        You know, the only people that I know that seriously dislike GCC are the commercial compiler venders. It's not perfect, but it has a major advantage that no other compiler has -- it frees the developer from worrying about vendor specific compiler issues when writing cross-platform code. One less thing to worry about.

        To me it's basicly like this - either the compiler's performance hardly matters at all, the code's performance is restricted by user speed, network speed or whatever OR it's incredibly performance oriented. If it's incredibly performance oriented, typically someone will make an assembler library that does that as efficiently as at all possible. Compiler performance is for the inbetweens where it's sorta important but not important enough. If you hit a performance bottleneck, very often it's a higher-level c

      • by moon3 (1530265)
        needs developers like a fish needs a bicycle

        I would not discourage potential developers like this, we all know that GCC is not perfect and that is (partly) because there is no real open source project to compete with GCC. I wasted many hours of my life waiting for GCC to finish its sluggish job.

        Years are passing by and the old problems with GCC are not disappearing. Thousands of developers have to struggle with it daily. There sure is a place for alternative compiler with different source code architect
        • by Rob Riggs (6418)

          I would not discourage potential developers like this, we all know that GCC is not perfect and that is (partly) because there is no real open source project to compete with GCC.

          I would and do, because I fundamentally disagree with your premise. If developers are going spend time on a compiler, do it on a compiler that targets multiple platforms, not just slightly different operating systems on the same CPU. Getting an optimizing compiler right across multiple CPU architectures is HARD. GCC has already forked twice in my experience (pgcc, egcs). If needed, it will happen again. In this way all open source programs are their own competition.

          The real problem with GCC is that th

          • by moon3 (1530265)
            real problem with GCC is that there are not enough developers working on it

            Sony, Google and Apple that rely on GCC in everything from iPhone, OS X, Android to Sony's Playstation 3 should be dropping millions on this project. One would assume that the GCC developers are well off and covered by big corporate donors. Why is that not so?

            Looking at GNU GCC web page, it really strikes me, that project of such an importance and gravity has such a poor on-line presence.

            No wonder that the group of developers
            • I can't speak for any of the others, but Apple is fairly active in gcc development. They keep their own branch but submit a lot back. They're also active in llvm and are using it in their opengl stack, iphone sdk, and opencl (grand central) in 10.6.

              The developer pool is small because:

              • gcc is mature and generally works
              • gcc is a monolithic mess and there is a steep learning curve to understanding and improving it
              • the number of people with the time, inclination, and skill to work on it is small. Many
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by d43m0n13 (461625)
      Actually, KDevelop (at least version 3) has a very nice Intel C++ support, and Sun's compiler (whatever it's called nowadays) support too, I think. Even if KDevelop didn't support a particular compiler, the only thing missing would be the jump-to-error functionality.

      And Watcom, is, well, irrelevant (ISO C++, anyone?).
  • As seen with KDE 4.0 ("Can't even save printer settings"), and now KOffice 2.0 ("Who needs a settings dialog anyway?")?

    Seriously, someone needs to find who wrote the fucking memo that says you can have all the regressions you want as long as your applications use Qt4.

    • by ultrabot (200914) on Tuesday June 02, 2009 @02:25PM (#28185565)

      Seriously, someone needs to find who wrote the fucking memo that says you can have all the regressions you want as long as your applications use Qt4.

      It's a new app, there is no such thing as a regression. Same applies to many other KDE4 progs.

      That being said, C++ intelligence for KDevelop4 rocks. Too bad it's not as stable as Qt Creator yet (so I already sort of jumped the ship).

      For kdevelop4, perhaps they could consider the approach taken by emacs for gdb integration as "competitive" measure- i.e. just act as all-singing, all dancing code showing frontend for gdb, with normal gdb console visible at all times. For many scenarios, dumbened frontends just can't hack it.

      • Seriously, someone needs to find who wrote the fucking memo that says you can have all the regressions you want as long as your applications use Qt4.

        It's a new app, there is no such thing as a regression. Same applies to many other KDE4 progs.

        If it is a _new app_ why they keep using the same names, and increasing the version numbers? Which is the computing standard for "new version of app X".

        • by True Grit (739797) *

          Which is the computing standard for "new version of app X".

          There isn't one, which is precisely why we're having these endless flamewars about the initial state of KDE 4.0 when it was released.

Faith may be defined briefly as an illogical belief in the occurence of the improbable. - H. L. Mencken

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