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Google Wave Reviewed 365

Posted by samzenpus
from the what's-the-skinny dept.
Michael_Curator writes "Developers are finally getting their hands on the developer preview of Google's Wave, which means we can finally get some first-hand accounts of what it's really like to use, unfiltered by Google's own programmers. Ben Rometsch, a developer with U.K. Web development firm Solid State, blogged that, it's 'probably the most advanced application in a browser that I've seen.' Wave is like giant Web page onto which users can drag and drop any kind of object, including instant messaging and IRC [Internet Relay Client] clients, e-mail, and wikis, as well as gadgets like maps and video. All conversations, work product and applications are stored on remote servers — presumably forever. 'It's like real time email. On crack,' he wrote. And unlike the typically minimalist Google UI, 'It feels a lot more like a desktop application that just so happens to live in your browser.'" User molex333 has already written a Slashdot app and shares his initial reactions here.
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Google Wave Reviewed

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  • by popo (107611) on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @08:49PM (#28790153) Homepage

    Does the expression "on crack" mean, "better"? And if so, why?

    • by 93 Escort Wagon (326346) on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @08:52PM (#28790167)

      Does the expression "on crack" mean, "better"? And if so, why?

      I always interpreted that phrase to mean "way more hyper and totally unpredictable". So in my mind, anyway, that's a "no".

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      Normally it means "bad" or "messed up", but I think in this case it's more "hyperactive". The author seems to be stating "if your email program could get high on cocaine, it would be like Google Wave."

    • by omeomi (675045) on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @09:16PM (#28790327) Homepage
      It's a fairly common American expression, or at least it was. Generally anything on crack is something supercharged. Bigger, faster, better. I have no idea where the saying originated from. It's best not to think about it, I guess.
      • by Nerdfest (867930) on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @09:53PM (#28790539)
        The more appropriate expression might be 'on steroids'. If it was 'on crack', it would look like a MySpace page.
        • by StreetStealth (980200) on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @10:13PM (#28790665) Journal

          Most likely, this is an attempt at a linguistic intensification of the idiom "on steroids." There was a time when steroid use was more of a taboo and to reference it in casual conversation was marginally titillating, but perhaps "on crack" comes closer to attaining that mischievousness today.

          Even though it doesn't really make sense (steroids increase muscle mass, but crack doesn't really increase anything except an extreme imbalance of neurotransmitters) it fits with our general cultural pattern of intensifying language. "Going ape," for instance, was an appropriate term for wild human behavior as apes tend to be associated with wild movements, but "going apeshit," while sounding more intense, doesn't make any semantic sense in that an ape's feces don't exactly move much at all.

        • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

          by 42forty-two42 (532340)
          Given how chaotic and unstable Wave is at the moment (based on my experiences with it anyway), I think "on crack" is a very good metaphor for the situation right now.
        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by omeomi (675045)
          Now that you mention it, it probably comes out of the fervor in the 80's over crack. Back then, the story was that it made people into these super-crazy super-strong unstoppable criminals. You could shoot a crack-head in the face 5 times back then, and they'd still lift up your police car and throw it across the street. From what I've heard, the punishment for crack possession is still far worse than it is for cocaine possession. And yes, I get my drug insight from NPR, so yes, I am a nerd.
          • That doesn't sound like crack, that sounds like PCP coupled with immortality. If you shoot a guy 5 times in the face and he still throws your car across the street, you've got a supervillain problem rather than a drug problem.

    • I think the implication is that "real time email" usually jittery, paranoid, and willing to do anything however depraved, demeaning or desperate for a hit of sweet sweet crack.
    • by Tumbleweed (3706) *

      Does the expression "on crack" mean, "better"? And if so, why?

      It's like the word 'better', but on crack! It's whacked! It's dope! The roof is on fire! That's bad-ass! Just keepin' it real, dude. You should get with the times, and be a hep cat. Word.

    • by Twinbee (767046)

      Well come on, it's just semantics in the end.

      However, I like the idea of unifying existing protocols into one.

      I wish the same would happen with HTML/Word/PDF files. One killer 'html/text/graphic/hyperlink' format which is light, but very powerful and flexible, and which is universally used.

    • by stephanruby (542433) on Thursday July 23, 2009 @02:03AM (#28792097)

      Does the expression "on crack" mean, "better"? And if so, why?

      The "on crack" comment is so vague, it says a lot more about the reviewer than the technology being reviewed.

      That being said, since I also participated in two Google events in which we were using the Google Wave technology, I'm going to give you my own personal review (which may be as bad as the initial review, it's mostly a disorganized brain dump at this point, so bear with me as well). I did agree to an NDA during those google events, these last couple of times you actually can't get in if you don't agree to one, but I don't think Google is the type to enforce it on me, especially since my review is mostly positive overall (even if it includes a few barbs).

      First off, here is my description of Google Wave, it's a cross between a Wiki and an Instant Messenger (with some added capabilities that may not seem initially obvious to everyone, but that will seem completely obvious to power users of the wiki technology and power users of the instant messengers technology). And each Wave itself is the equivalent of a wiki page (if that makes any sense).

      Now here is my first impression of Google Wave, which differs significantly from my overall final impression of it. Google Wave is buggy (even in Windows Chrome and Firefox, and even in Windows Safari which does support HTML 5 and which is supposedly faster, and I was advised not to use IE with it -- so I assume that this part is even more buggier still). The initial inbox interface looks rather busy and clunky (especially from a Company like Google, I just didn't expect an interface like that). Searching for your friends (who already have wave sandbox accounts) and adding them to your address book works only 90% of the time (although, that part does work 100% of the time if you go to your gmail address book that comes with your new wave sandbox account, you just have to know to use that workaround -- otherwise you just get frustrated by it especially since the interface doesn't give you back useful informative feedback that something went wrong). Also, the inbox doesn't always refresh (even on a blazing fast guest connection inside the googleplex campus). And initially, I was quite baffled by the wave inbox interface. I had created ten empty waves by mistake, that I didn't know how to delete (now, I know how thought, at least I think I would know how to delete them, I haven't tried it yet).

      Where Google Wave shines however is in its actual use (even in its buggy alpha state, it's actually quite useful, I would totally use it if I could get my colleagues accounts), and it's in the actual wave itself (not the surrounding interface). I don't know how many we were, may be 150 or 200? May be 70% of us had laptops in front of us. May be 30 or 40% of us had the actual wave opened, others were doing something else on their laptops or had them semi-closed. And may be only 4 or 5 were taking actual notes (one or two were doing the bulk of the notes). The notes were excellent. Everything that was being said was transcribed live, "livewaving" that's what the google employees called it (just like for Twitter, the Google employees had many cutesy-cheesy names for everything wave was doing), and the notes/statements/questions said out lout during the presentations were clarified, corrected, rephrased, and formatted by two or three people (just a couple of lines above where they had been captured). There was no coordination whatsoever, people just added things wherever they felt they could contribute. Also, the initial attempt at coordination by the Google organizers was foiled, because they were too slow to create the group and start an official wave on their own, the participants already had a wave underway by the time they started -- so that became the official one by default.

      At the same time the notes were being taken, there were a few more participants who started a couple of threads (within the wave itself, just at the bottom -- a couple of scroll

  • Great! (Score:3, Funny)

    by csueiras (1461139) on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @08:59PM (#28790211)
    Google is probably one of the most if not the most innovative companies in the world, I wouldn't be surprised if they have just created the next generation of communication!
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by teknopurge (199509)

      Google is probably one of the most if not the most innovative companies in the world, I wouldn't be surprised if they have just created the next generation of communication!

      Are you kidding? Again, Google has cobbled together existing technology and instead of learning the lesson that SMTP taught US 25 years ago Google is content to have something else that will live in beta for years. Why create new technology when you can duct tape existing things together?


      While I'm teetering on the brink of ranting, so Google is releasing an OS, while they continue to overload the web browser with javascript and flash in an effort to turn it into an operating system. Again, we've al

      • Re:Great! (Score:5, Insightful)

        by John Hasler (414242) on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @09:35PM (#28790439) Homepage

        > Write some C for christ sake, or hell, even a Java SE app.

        How is that going to get them more eyeballs to sell to their advertisers?

        • > Write some C for christ sake, or hell, even a Java SE app.

          How is that going to get them more eyeballs to sell to their advertisers?

          well-played sir, well played.

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by VGPowerlord (621254)

          Write some C for christ sake, or hell, even a Java SE app.

          How is that going to get them more eyeballs to sell to their advertisers?

          The corollary to that is what exactly does it offer to users?

          I have this great application that allows me to drag and drop things ("applications") where I want them on the screen. It's called "Windows" and if you don't like it, there's several similar applications called "OSX," "GNOME," and "KDE" that do the same thing.

          Right now, my chain goes:
          Operating System -> Windowing S

      • Re:Great! (Score:5, Insightful)

        by RichardDeVries (961583) on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @09:45PM (#28790501) Journal

        Google has cobbled together existing technology

        This is the mother of all 'get off my lawn' arguments. Using existing technology is what brings us most innovations. In fact, using existing technology is what every programmer does.

        ... and instead of learning the lesson that SMTP taught US 25 years ago Google is content to have something else that will live in beta for years.

        SMTP is in beta?
        I've only seen the demovideo and done a bit of reading. The ideas behind wave are innovative, ambitious and pretty well thought through. If wave becomes a success, it will take years before it's massively deployed. It might also take years to fail spectacularly, either through bad development decisions, or just through failing to come up with the killer-app.
        But to bash it now is stupid. Google is doing this the right way. They're following a vision that might be wrong, or might not be what you're looking for. But it will be open-sourced, so you can create your own wave services. And it doesn't have to be inside a browser, as far as I understand it.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by rs79 (71822)

          "SMTP is in beta?"

          who cares it's a crap protocol written by a psych major that was barely appropriate for the glass crt 24x80 world and had to be extended bizarrely to do anything useful and took 20 years to get a decent daemon on certain platforms.

          maybe wave isn't the end all be all, maybe it's the multics that causes unix to be born or maybe wave will be the shizzle.

          the sooner i can break away from this spam infested, made worse by anti-spam (oh look the worst of both worlds) nightmare of 1976 technolog

      • Google is probably one of the most if not the most innovative companies in the world, I wouldn't be surprised if they have just created the next generation of communication!

        Are you kidding? Again, Google has cobbled together existing technology

        I think that might be the "innovation". Also, why do innovations have to be perfect suddenly?

        • The don't need to be perfect - they just need to be substantially different in a productive way.
        • by bursch-X (458146)
          The automobile was invented by Karl Benz using existing technology, that didn't make it less of an innovation. The wheel was invented using existing technologies (wood carving, punching holes into things etc.), but... get the gist? It's of the innovative use of these technologies in different ways, or the combination and application of known technologies in unexpected places or ways that makes innovation.
      • Re:Great! (Score:4, Informative)

        by gmuslera (3436) on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @10:33PM (#28790811) Homepage Journal

        Are you kidding? Again, Google has cobbled together existing technology and instead of learning the lesson that SMTP taught US 25 years ago Google is content to have something else that will live in beta for years. Why create new technology when you can duct tape existing things together?

        If something taught us SMTP is that is not panacea, there is a big hole in that specification and is called "real time" (well, if you want, add spam to the mix). Wave goes directly to the heart of it, having communication between one or several people (like smtp), but in real time, adding authentication, easy to use and powerful web interface, multimedia and more things that will be disclosed/developed in time. And takes on instant messaging/xmpp if you want too, adding things that are more from smtp realm.

        Could had done it mixing and matching existing protocols? Maybe yes, maybe not. And maybe those alternatives dont have the flexibility needed for wild evolution that this could have.

        While I'm teetering on the brink of ranting, so Google is releasing an OS, while they continue to overload the web browser with javascript and flash in an effort to turn it into an operating system. Again, we've already done this. We have these tools already. It's called a Native Application. Write some C for christ sake, or hell, even a Java SE app. Maybe some QT/OpenGL? Writing all these applications for the browser is putting a square peg in a round hole.

        Considering how safe proved to be the most used operating system around, taking most of the responsibility into something that they could control and fix is not a very bad move. Native Applications could be faster (faster than all the push google and others had done to have a very fast javascript engines, but not for so much now), but could pass easily the ball to the underlying operating system, and of course, not be future proof (future as in other architectures at the very least, both because be totally new or gains more popularity alternative ones).

        And maybe you could be right... for local, very cpu intensive applications. But for writting internet applications building them over existing internet clients (i.e. browser, you have there all the portability, all the security, etc) looks reasonable.

      • "Cobbling together", ahem, building applications by reusing existing protocols and formats is a good thing--not a bad thing. Also, I'm not sure why you're associating this particular app with an OS in a browser because if you watch the preview video it's clearly a collaboration and communication application, but.. anyway...

        I thought the goal was to run these apps anywhere while maintaining the same user experience regardless of OS and browser, yet feature lightweight on the fly downloads. Getting users to d

        • You missed the point entirely!! REUSE IS A GOOD THING PROVIDED YOU BUILD ON THE FOUNDATION. Google doesn't reuse ideas or technology to create new things, they just repackage and recycle existing technology. Pagerank was the last innovation they had.
          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by lena_10326 (1100441)

            You missed the point entirely!! REUSE IS A GOOD THING PROVIDED YOU BUILD ON THE FOUNDATION.

            Now you're talking gibberish. So, HTML, XML, CSS, Javascript are not considered foundational tools? Odd. I would rather you point out their design or implementation flaws (there are many) rather than make obviously untrue silly statements. You can say the foundation is poorly implemented, but you cannot argue that these tools are not foundational.

            Google doesn't reuse ideas or technology to create new things, they just

      • Re:Great! (Score:5, Insightful)

        by fabs64 (657132) <beaufabry+slashdot,org&gmail,com> on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @10:38PM (#28790861)

        "instead of learning the lesson that SMTP taught US 25 years ago " which lesson in particular are they ignoring?

        As for the thick app argument, why do you care? Seriously, if the solution works it works. The toggle switch guys scoffed at the punch card guys, the punch card guys scoffed at the interactive asm editor guys, the asm guys scoffed at the C guys, the C guys scoffed at the Java guys, the Java guys scoff at the Ruby/Python/PHP/JS guys.
        You don't see the trend?

        • Re:Great! (Score:4, Insightful)

          by teknopurge (199509) on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @11:21PM (#28791155) Homepage
          This isn't a coke vs. pepsi thing. I can run MS excel with 20 megs of ram. Google spreedsheet in firefox takes over 100 megs of ram. An ftp socket and script to upload my excel file somewhere for sharing doesn't account for 80 megs worth of space complexity: 400% more resources than the thick client app! Once more, someone could have a macro in excel that does the uploading with one-click, so grandma can do it, and maybe you'll see 21 megs of ram used. I just don't understand why we aren't see new and DIFFERNT types of software instead of office applications, photo editors, audio editors, 3d games, and anything else you've used before appear on the web, but with Social 3.0!


          I'm all about the right tool for the right job: I don't care who makes it as long as it works well, is reliable and efficient. Google does a lot of things, none particularly well, sans advertising; Wolfram even has better search then they do and I really to hate to say this, but Bing has decent results. (i still default to google search though)
          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by fabs64 (657132)

            I'm not sure how bolding makes your point, I didn't say it was a coke vs. pepsi thing I was saying it was a grandpa vs grandson thing.

            It uses 400% more resources, big whoop. 9 iterations of moore's law and that amount of resources is just as negligible as the office client is now, let alone *manageable* which is the important number and where 100mb squarely sits at the moment.
            The *difference* the "magic sauce" is specifically in the automatic collaboration and portability enabled by the server-side nature.

        • Re:Great! (Score:4, Funny)

          by severoon (536737) on Thursday July 23, 2009 @03:16AM (#28792491) Journal

          I agree with everything you've said...except for the punch card guys. Screw the punch card guys, they deserved every scoff they got. Screw them!

      • Re:Great! (Score:5, Interesting)

        by rossifer (581396) on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @11:21PM (#28791151) Journal

        What you're not seeing is Google's strategic intent (I work for Google, but this stuff is public).

        Google's goal is to commodify (reduce the marginal profit to zero) of everything that they don't make money on. The hardware is pretty much commodified already. Plenty of competitors and the profit margins are razor thin. Next levels are the OS and the applications. These are not yet commodified due to Microsoft's aggressively maintained monopoly. Contrary to common knowledge, Microsoft's real monopoly is in the Office file formats. From that, they've levered a monopoly into basic individual productivity applications and then (with Apple's cooperation) the operating system. They are also a serious player in second-generation collaboration tools (extensions to basic email).

        In order to reduce Microsoft's war chest and eliminate their competitiveness, Google seeks to lower the profit margin on everything Microsoft currently produces at a profit (Windows and Office). So they produce a cheaper operating system, cheaper productivity applications, and cheaper collaboration tools (ideally free to the typical user). Google doesn't need to make money (though breaking even would be nice), Google just needs to apply pressure to Microsoft to cut their revenues/profits and the strategic goals are being met.

        Writing apps that run on Windows? Doesn't help Google very much (though SketchUp and Picasa and a few other things are native apps).
        Writing protocols that run on any machine? Helps Google a lot.
        Writing web applications that use those protocols and run on any machine? Helps Google a lot.

        Look at the bigger picture. Google is acting extremely rationally here.

        As for whether Wave is innovative or not, I don't think you've tried it and are speaking without informing yourself. Wave is to email as email is to snail mail (single addressee, no broadcast, etc.). Wave tackles the problem of a widely CC:'d email with an attached Word or Excel document (two threads of changes: one in the email thread, one in the document) (multiple obsolete copies of the document available) (possible confusion and delay as people are added to the thread and have to re-read the history duplicated in most of the recent emails). Wave creates a "place" for this discussion/collaborative authoring to happen and then let's everyone bring whatever they want to help out. Wave is not email++ (which is what Outlook and Gmail are).

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by teknopurge (199509)
          That was a good read - thanks for sharing the insight. I honestly didn't look at the POV of google reducing profit margins on its competitor's services, that it offers, in order to squeeze them out. They get a 2for: more customers and fewer competitors. Smart move really.

          I do want to share the fact that I haven't used Wave, you are correct. Based on your description of Wave and what I perceived it to be from reading articles and seeing demos, I am still correct in my analysis. Here is an old writeu [vt.edu]
      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by styrotech (136124)

        While I'm teetering on the brink of ranting, so Google is releasing an OS, while they continue to overload the web browser with javascript and flash in an effort to turn it into an operating system. Again, we've already done this. We have these tools already. It's called a Native Application. Write some C for christ sake, or hell, even a Java SE app. Maybe some QT/OpenGL? Writing all these applications for the browser is putting a square peg in a round hole.

        Nothing about Wave prevents that.

        Wave is a bunch o

  • Sounds like g.ho.st (Score:5, Interesting)

    by sanjosanjo (804469) <sanjosanjo AT gmail DOT com> on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @09:00PM (#28790215)
    I've dabbled with http://g.ho.st/ [g.ho.st] and it sounds similar. I've been impressed at how snappy g.ho.st is, so I would expect good things from Google, also.
    • G.ho.st is interesting, but no, wave isn;t like that. Wave isn't an emulation of a notional desktop computer on a web page. Wave is like a mixture of email, IM and live collaborative document editing, with a open API such that 3rd parties can create additional communication centric applications.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Sporkinum (655143)

      I had never heard about g.ho.st before your post. It's interesting technology, but looks like it has a ways to go. Less than 10k views of their demo video on youtube. Also, it ran pretty slow in my browser (firefox 3.5). On a good note, since it is a web page, adblock+ works.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Pentagram (40862)

      That's pretty weird. I've just had a play with it and I'm struggling to think what to do with it. What's particularly weird is that the desktop has a web browser. Why would you need a browser if you're already using a browser to view the desktop? Naturally, the first thing I did with it was go to http://g.ho.st/ [g.ho.st] and open a new guest account...

  • by White Flame (1074973) on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @09:02PM (#28790237)

    They've said they're going to open-source the server so others can host their own waves. Until then, since I'd want to use this for collaborative development, and possibly for hosting my own sites, I'd rather not they own my content.

    • Indeed (Score:4, Interesting)

      by caitsith01 (606117) on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @10:36PM (#28790839) Journal

      I want guarantees that no-one and nothing at Google, Inc or anywhere else I don't expressly authorise has access to anything I drop into this magic box in my browser.

      Based on Google's track record, users should otherwise assume that anything and everything they let this system touch will be stored indefinitely even if deleted, indexed, and trawled for marketing and other purposes.

  • Tried it (Score:5, Informative)

    by agendi (684385) on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @09:08PM (#28790275)
    I've participated in a wavelet writing hack-a-thon and was impressed by the scope of the collaboration that it provides. I saw it as an email, shared docs, blogs, instant messaging, photo sharing in one protocol. It certainly wasn't perfect and some parts were rather underwhelming but overall it seemed like the beginning of a new way of doing things. I was talking with one of the devs in the Sydney office and he said that they use it internally and are surprised by the way that the more they used it the more they discovered new ways to use it. I took that as a good sign that it was a technology/protocol that was at the beginning of the discovery rather than one that is released with every usage known. Would I use it commercially - not yet, but I can imagine it becoming a core tool to organising/interacting my social circle. I could easily see it being a great tool for collaborative programming and/or a new generation of remote role playing (build a dice rolling tool, a mapping tool etc.)
    • by darrylo (97569)

      Heh, I'm more interested in the long-term plans for offline access.

      All this talk about new technologies is fine, but usability is important, too. I want to see what will happen when you're someplace without internet access.

        • by darrylo (97569)
          I know about Gears. I'm more interested in Google's thinking ("future visions", if you will) on how this is all supposed to work together.
      • by lennier (44736)

        "I want to see what will happen when you're someplace without internet access."

        Without... Internet access? That would be like... being 'off-line'? But then how would people post lolcats? They'd have to get Facebook updates via Gmail... oh wait...

        I'm sorry, I can't grasp that concept at all!

        • by darrylo (97569)

          I'm sorry, I can't grasp that concept at all!

          Perhaps it's time for an intervention? :-)

    • Question is, will it be adopted. And if a company can push new things, it is Apple, Microsoft and Google. Also, how will people transition from their email?

  • Ads (Score:2, Insightful)

    by rodrigovr (1396497)
    Will Wave have ads? Perhaps compulsory ones?
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by BasilBrush (643681)

      That's like saying will HTTP, FTP or SMTP have ads. It's fundamentally a communications protocol with some example apps built on. It can be used for ads just as it can be used for many other things. No doubt some people will use it for ads.

  • by Fear the Clam (230933) on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @09:44PM (#28790499)

    There's a girlfriend wondering why he won't annnnnsweeeeer any of the phone calls, voice mails, text messages, emails, or she's sent in the last ten minutes.

  • One telling remark, however â" given that Wave is supposed to run in a browser and not require any kind of desktop support: âoeIâ(TM)m not sure if there are API interfaces into the application but, ironically, itâ(TM)s crying out for a proper desktop client.â

    This could be interesting beyond Waves own success/failure. It sounds like we're finally going to face real wide scale usage of a full blown web based javascript app for the first time. Perhaps if it's successful we'll see s

  • like Yahoo are trying to do the same things [yahoo.com] with their search engines and web sites as well. here is a list of things Yahoo provides to developers [yahoo.com] including the BrowserPlus [yahoo.com] project which sounds a lot like what Google is try to do if I am not mistaken? Why is Yahoo not covered by Slashdot but Google is, for have an open API for developers to build on?

    Yahoo has had my.yahoo.com for a long time now for those who never even heard about it. I use it to keep track of content on web sites like Slashdot, etc and it

  • Mod me paranoid (Score:5, Insightful)

    by carp3_noct3m (1185697) <slashdot@warriors-shade . n et> on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @10:12PM (#28790661)

    But between this and Google OS and everything else, google is getting dangerously capable of mass information collection for nefarious purposes (read: more than is currently possible). Ive been willing enough to forgive the search engine because of its usefulness, but I see Google as the biggest potential data mining operation in the world. Have an OS, web search, email, chat, and voice all have the central management of one company who for all we know could have been served on of those secret orders they cant even talk about that all data mussed be passed on to some crazy orwellian agency. Not saying its true, but it makes you wonder...now I'm off to finish building my patented alaskan off-the-grid living structure called an igloo.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by linhares (1241614)

      But between this and Google OS and everything else, google is getting dangerously capable of mass information collection for nefarious purposes (read: more than is currently possible). Ive been willing enough to forgive the search engine because of its usefulness, but I see Google as the biggest potential data mining operation in the world. Have an OS, web search, email, chat, and voice all have the central management of one company who for all we know could have been served on of those secret orders they cant even talk about that all data mussed be passed on to some crazy orwellian agency. Not saying its true, but it makes you wonder...now I'm off to finish building my patented alaskan off-the-grid living structure called an igloo.

      It's safe to be with Microsoft [google.com], after all. Thanks for helping me calm down.

    • Re:Mod me paranoid (Score:5, Informative)

      by stephanruby (542433) on Thursday July 23, 2009 @02:57AM (#28792369)

      This is missing the point of Wave. It's not patented. It's open sourced. It's federated (with no central authority). There is nothing preventing a company, or an individual, from setting up their own wave server (either the one given away for free by Google, or another one developed by a third party), and not sharing one piece of data with Google.

      That's what makes the proposition so compelling. Google is not trying to lock in your data. It's doing everything it can to do the opposite actually.

  • What I am wondering: if Google OS is essentially "boot into your browser", then why would I need to write things in a slow JavaScript, if there is a fast Java itself? Android makes sense, but making applications (web/ajax stuff) within an application (browser)? What is wrong to get a 10M JRE from http://www.java.com/ [java.com] install it and have it running now and today in high performance even in 3-4 years old laptop, rather then get latest netbook on Atom 1.6GHz and cry for bloated Firefox?.. Anyone?

    OK, I do lots

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by sodul (833177)

      you can not really do much with JavaScript (e.g. write a multimedia player)

      HTML 5 is pushing the envelope enough to do most of what you need Flash and Silverlight for.

      Take a look at the webkit blog to get an idea of all the things possible in HTML 5 and CSS 3.0, now:
      - CSS masks: http://webkit.org/blog/181/css-masks/ [webkit.org]
      - CSS reflections: http://webkit.org/blog/182/css-reflections/ [webkit.org]
      - CSS animations: http://webkit.org/blog/324/css-animation-2/ [webkit.org]
      - CSS 3D animations: http://webkit.org/blog/386/3d-transforms/ [webkit.org]
      - video tag, already in use by dailymotion: h [dailymotion.com]

    • There is this common misconception that javascript is slow. Yeah right. LOOK at the chrome demonstrations. The sad fact is that Javascript suffers from a couple of faults that are hard to rememdy (but google might be force changes).

      It is hard to upgrade. Since every browser has to implement, you have to rely on every browsers implementation of it. If say Chome introduced javascript++ it would only run in Chrome. That is the reason googles api has a TON of IE specific fixes. So that dcvelopers can code for

  • Video (Score:5, Informative)

    by Twinbee (767046) on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @10:29PM (#28790781) Homepage

    And here's the obligatory hour long video to show the potential of the thing:
    http://wave.google.com/ [google.com]

    Some new and interesting concepts if you have the time to spare.

  • by Twinbee (767046) on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @10:33PM (#28790817) Homepage

    It would be nice if... you know... Google Wave existed outside the browser, and in a proper Windows/Linux GUI interface for faster widgets, less memory consumption etc.

    Internet/comm things don't HAVE to be done in the browser all the time.

  • by IGnatius T Foobar (4328) on Wednesday July 22, 2009 @10:39PM (#28790877) Homepage Journal
    The biggest deal here, which so far is quite understated, is that the protocol is open. It's based on XMPP (aka Jabber), including the server-to-server protocol. This means no one will be locked into a single site -- not even Google's, although I'm sure Google is counting on a lot of people using their site, and I'm sure they'll find other ways to leverage it to make some money as well. They're good at doing that -- and unintrusively, too.

    If this thing catches on, it's going to turn the whole Internet on its head -- in a good way. It's the end of being locked in to walled gardens like Exchange and Facebook -- although either of those products would be able to tie into the global Wave federation if they wanted to.

    I'm looking forward to seeing lots of different software and sites that speak Wave protocol. For that matter, I'm looking forward to writing one someday.
  • by MarkWatson (189759) on Thursday July 23, 2009 @01:28AM (#28791877) Homepage

    The documentation is good, so it is easy to get started. I view Wave as "something for the future" but I think that it is worth 3 or 4 hours a week coding to it. It was a thrill when my robot replied to a wave that I had invited it to join (like a human). For writing robots, I look forward to a local runtime and debugging setup. Overall, I think that Wave looks promising and I am mentally re-evaluating several web application projects that I have done in the last ten years, thinking of how I might re-implement them on Wave.

  • My original article (Score:3, Interesting)

    by cca93014 (466820) on Thursday July 23, 2009 @05:08AM (#28793021) Homepage

If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate.

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