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Java Creator James Gosling Hired At Google 229

Posted by CmdrTaco
from the write-your-own-ticket dept.
jfruhlinger writes "Some months after leaving Oracle in a huff, father of Java James Gosling has joined Google. It's not clear what his job responsibilities will be there, but given some of his past statements about Google projects — that Android has no adult supervision, for instance — it will be interesting to see what develops."
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Java Creator James Gosling Hired At Google

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  • Heh (Score:5, Funny)

    by MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) on Monday March 28, 2011 @01:03PM (#35641466)

    "Some months after leaving Oracle in a huff, father of Java James Gosling has joined Google. It's not clear what his job responsibilities will be there..".

    Maybe Google thought things were just moving too quickly.

  • Really? (Score:3, Informative)

    by diskofish (1037768) on Monday March 28, 2011 @01:09PM (#35641548)
    Gosling is pretty detached from reality and he says a lot of crazy stuff. I can see why he left Oracle (or was forced out). Remember what he said about C#? C# is a very sucessful language and in some areas, more sucessful than Java. Gosling on C#:

    We were panicked about C# a while ago. And we've gotten somewhat more relaxed about it. It's certainly something to be concerned about, given the amount of resources Microsoft can bring to bear. But I've had conversations with developers. It has not been that big an issue with developers. It's actually been much more a public relations issue than a reality issue. Read more: http://news.cnet.com/2008-1082-817522.html#ixzz1HumJH5sb [cnet.com]

    • Re:Really? (Score:5, Informative)

      by Rary (566291) on Monday March 28, 2011 @01:36PM (#35641976)
      That article is dated in early 2002. Most developers I know were quite unsure of C# and .NET in general in 2002. The consulting company I work for planned to launch an internal C# project in late 2002. We use internal projects as a training opportunity, so technology is chosen based on what skills would be most beneficial for our consultants to have experience with. Just before the project started, management decided to switch to Java because it was perceived to be a more valuable skill. In the years that have passed since then, .NET has caught up, so today we do about as much .NET work as Java work. But back then, it was still the new kid on the block, and most weren't sure what to think of it.
      • In any case, C# really was much more similar to Java in 2002 than it is today. Back then, the type systems were essentially identical, and the few things that you've got from C# were syntactic sugar for properties & evens, attributes (what Java later called "annotations"), enums, unsigned types, and unsafe code (raw unchecked pointers with arithmetic) when you need it. Not that it's a short list, but I don't think that it was that big of a deal.

        Since then things have changed a lot, largely because the p

    • Re:Really? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by UnknowingFool (672806) on Monday March 28, 2011 @02:25PM (#35642738)
      Even today, I wouldn't say C# is more successful than Java in many areas--unless the company is a strong Windows shop. Most companies I've worked for won't use it for the simple reason that their production servers are Linux or Unix. That means no .NET. And yes they know about Mono. Since it isn't officially sanctioned by MS, it's not an option.
      • Good points. In addition, an even worse aspect of C#/Mono than not "officially sanctioned by MS", is Mono simply doesn't have all the 'standard' libraries that you get with C#. At least with Java you get the same thing everywhere (which is why Java still rules the Enterprise space, according to the Tiobe Index etc).
        • I take it you have not used Mono in some time. It's gotten much better in the past couple years. I've worked on many .NET projects over the years. I haven't really found any major "standard" libraries that are missing in Mono as you claim. Mono has got all of the System, IO, XML, Regex, and even Linq stuff. For web, I do all my work in Visual Studio on a Windows machine and run both in .NET and Mono. I do run into small issues or bugs when working with Mono from time to time but it's really better tha
  • I imagine that in supervising his children at Google, Mr. Gossling will orient them thusly: class employee{ private int assigntask=0; private int punish=0; private int reward=0; private int delete=0; ...etc.... }
  • by sexconker (1179573) on Monday March 28, 2011 @01:23PM (#35641770)

    Why is this guy still in the news?
    I get it - he's a douche, and his wife Kate is an overbearing bitch, and all they both care about is making money (over $1,000,000 per episode) off of their litter.
    Who cares if their kids get psychologically ruined? I mean, it's not like they had a chance to become productive, sane members of society with those two as parents anyway.
    In a perfect world, they'd be in jail and the kids would be adopted.

    But no, now this guy is being given a cushy job at Google, for what? Java?
    Please, that's what Amazon Mechanical Turk is for.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Finally a voice of reason in this terrifically difficult to understand situation

  • by LordStormes (1749242) on Monday March 28, 2011 @01:34PM (#35641934) Homepage Journal
    Gosling will be able to easily ensure that Google's Android code base is free of anything Oracle's disputing. For the long term, it only makes sense that the creator of Java is now involved in the language's biggest current flagship technology. As a developer with experience in both C# and Java, C# is the spiritual sequel to J++. It was MS' answer to the then-war with Sun over Java on Windows, and a sad effort at that. A language tied directly to a single OS = BAD. As a Java coder, I can get a job developing on desktop PCs, Web applications, smartphones, Blu-Ray players and TVs, or Martian rovers. People get frustrated with Java because it's got some pretty obnoxiously verbose syntax, but it's well-respected for what it is. I find it comical when people flame Java's runtimes, and then love how they can run other languages' code in a JVM environment.
    • For the long term, it only makes sense that the creator of Java is now involved in the language's biggest current flagship technology.

      I wasn't aware that Google was involved in JavaEE in any way.

      Or did you mean "current popular technology?"

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by oracleguy01 (1381327)

      As a developer with experience in both C# and Java, C# is the spiritual sequel to J++. It was MS' answer to the then-war with Sun over Java on Windows, and a sad effort at that. A language tied directly to a single OS = BAD. As a Java coder, I can get a job developing on desktop PCs, Web applications, smartphones, Blu-Ray players and TVs, or Martian rovers.

      C# is tied to one OS? Huh, I guess no one bothered to tell the guys that make Unity [unity3d.com] that, seeing how their product uses C# and is cross platform.

      • by ags1 (1883204) on Monday March 28, 2011 @02:29PM (#35642800)
        C# is very portable, IF you pick your libraries right, IF you don't use any standard features that are windows centric, IF you don't call any native libraries, IF you want to wait for the advanced feature to get ported to your platforms implementation... etc. You have to do a lot of work to keep from falling into lock in. The thing about Java is, its very hard to make an app not cross platform. You have to do a lot of work to lock yourself into a platform using Java.
      • No but the .NET framework is. Without the framework, C# is hard to use as companies will have design many things from scratch. Mono isn't acceptable for some companies given uncertainty in patents and whether MS may intentionally break compatibility or embark upon legal action.
    • by StormReaver (59959) on Monday March 28, 2011 @02:41PM (#35642984)

      Gosling will be able to easily ensure that Google's Android code base is free of anything Oracle's disputing.

      Which changes nothing. Odds are that Android was already carefully screened to be free of Oracle contamination, but Oracle sued anyway. That's just Oracle culture.

      • by Doomdark (136619)
        I agree in that Gosling's checking of codebase is probably not all that valuable in itself (as he can't really be external objective third-party here), but I think it can have positive effect for credibility of Google's defense. It's not about trying to prevent Oracle from suing, but rather in improving chances of winning, or limiting damages. Gosling is obviously knowledgeable on Java and history, but also about various litigations related to Java.
  • by thisisauniqueid (825395) on Monday March 28, 2011 @01:39PM (#35642014)
    My favorite Gosling quote: "The worst thing that can happen to a programming language you create is that people start to use it."
    • by H0p313ss (811249)

      That sounds more like something Stoustrup would say.

      • It is more something that the software designers say in general .:
        The worst thing that can happen to a < T extends Code > you create is that people start to use it

  • Gosling going to Google is an obvious choice. However, I seriously doubt he has anything to contribute other than name recognition. Gosling did a piss poor job on the design and evolution of Java to begin with.

    • by DrEasy (559739)

      I think some of the decisions were forced by the marketing division, who were in a hurry to release the language. Marketing was probably right though, given the success of the language, warts be damned.

    • by Doomdark (136619) on Monday March 28, 2011 @02:52PM (#35643134) Homepage Journal
      Gosling did a piss poor job on the design and evolution of Java to begin with.

      How so? I thought it was generally consider a pretty decent job, and not just due to actual success of the platform and language. While Java has its quirks like any other programming language, it seems pretty well-rounded and practical. Your statement would suggest much more than that, so what exact things back up your statement?

      • by t2t10 (1909766)

        Java's design had a whole bunch of problems that a competent language designer in the 1990's should have been able to avoid (in the object system, number system, error handling, etc.), given that there was almost nothing new in Java. So, in that sense, Gosling did a piss poor job. Java itself still ended up being a significant improvement over C/C++ for most people, simply because C/C++ set the bar so low.

        (Many of these problems with Java then got fixed by an army of language lawyers and specialists. Unf

        • by Cederic (9623)

          At the time Java was up against C, C++, VB and Delphi as the key development languages off mainframe.

          I'd say that by v1.1 and definitely by v1.2 it was more usable with better features than all of those as a server-side development language.

          J2EE replaced CORBA and led to the dominance of Java app servers as the server-side platform of choice for many companies.

          Even app vendors switched to it, unless they were specifically targeting the mainframe or Windows..

          Other markets (device drivers, embedded systems, d

  • by D H NG (779318) on Monday March 28, 2011 @01:49PM (#35642184)
    James Gosling - Java Guido van Rossum - Python Ken Thompson - C, Go Joshua Bloch - Java
    • by ravyne (858869)
      What? No mention of Rob Pike?

      Turn in thy geek card good sir.
    • Wow. I hadn't seen it tallied up like that.

      *Banging on Google's door*
      Let me in! Let me in! I want off this rock!

    • The fact that they've got both Bloch and now Gosling is particularly interesting. I wonder if Google will have the balls (or be forced to, by the ongoing legal action) to fork Java into their own project. It has been stagnating for a while now with little development other than "enterprisey" server-side stuff, and it would be nice if some people who are good at it could pick it up and drive it in "release early, release often" fashion. That, and none of that Oracle patent bullshit.

  • by monk (1958) on Monday March 28, 2011 @01:55PM (#35642274) Homepage

    I like Gosling, he's a good guy and he asks great questions.

    I'm hoping this means more focus on AppEngine. It supports a Python or Java API. (I prefer Python) It's a very cool place to build things. I just built a small multi-vendor site for our local makers and crafters and had a blast doing it.

    disclaimer: I used to work for Sun in the Java Center.

  • Ii gets worse. He finshes a question with "it feels like it's(Android) going to be more of a dog's breakfast.”

    He seems an interesting guy, obviously brilliant, but his broad view arrows miss their target by a long way.

    For example, in the same interview, he questions the free cost of Android. Its easy to assume the reasons, and this was shored up with the "Castle and moat" scenario put forward a few days back. It should have been obvious to him.

    Gosling also says he "hopes not to be pulled into th
    • And this is a problem because?

      Look, if he thinks Android sucks balls AND can make it better, why complain?
      It's not like being an employee means you have to tow the company line.

      Besides, the Castle and Moat scenario basically said to me that Google cares more about making money off me by selling my eyeballs than it does making a product that's well polished. It's the "we're done when it's good enough" condition that resulted in Windows being the primary computing OS.

    • by fwarren (579763)

      At the time Sun who $$$ paid $$$ him to give any possible objection he could to the android platform. I don't know if that was an honest opinion or not. Besides, now that he is in the camp and can offer "influence", he might like it far better.

  • I guess he will write an emacs clone in GoLang :-)

    (ok it's a joke, and linked to the fact that although I'm regular emacs user planning to grow a sixt finger "RSN"... I'm not super fan of Java...

    • by H0p313ss (811249)

      I guess he will write an emacs clone in GoLang :-)

      I think it's called Eclipse.

  • Did they ask him.. (Score:4, Interesting)

    by BigGerman (541312) on Monday March 28, 2011 @03:02PM (#35643252)
    .. to reverse a String during the interview? ;-) Seriously, Google needs to stop hiring ivory tower theoreticians and get some "normal" devs to clean up their act.
  • ... over java, they can see - "Lets just ask the man who invented Java"

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