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Software Technology

Stack Exchange Website Profiler Now Open Source 56

Posted by timothy
from the go-forth-and-profile dept.
ScuttleMonkey writes "Joel Spolsky sent out smoke signals this morning about the recent release of the Stack Exchange Website Profiler as open source. Sam Saffron expounds on why this profiler is perhaps 'best and most comprehensive production web page profiler out there for any web platform.' The project is available via Google Code or NuGet."
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Stack Exchange Website Profiler Now Open Source

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  • by yincrash (854885) on Thursday June 09, 2011 @02:41PM (#36391858)
    To be a little bit more informative is a low profile monitoring tool for production environments running .NET mvc.
    • Re: (Score:1, Offtopic)

      by h4rr4r (612664)

      Awesome, open source code that requires you to use a closed source system to run it. That always makes me laugh.

      • Do you laugh out loud, or just quietly to yourself?
      • by j-pimp (177072) <zippy1981.gmail@com> on Thursday June 09, 2011 @03:08PM (#36392246) Homepage Journal

        Awesome, open source code that requires you to use a closed source system to run it. That always makes me laugh.

        Are you running on pure open hardware? is all the microcode on all your firmware devices open source?

        You have a piece of software that can be integrated in a .NET web app to gain more visibility into how the app functions. Having that available is a good thing if you write .NET code. Having the source code available is a potentially better thing for you (I say potentially because I'm speaking of immediate and direct utility). The fact that .NET itself is not open source, and that windows itself is not open source does not nullify the utility of access to the source code for this profiler.

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Yeah, it's similar very similar to Linux. Running an open source system on closed source hardware. That always makes me laugh.

      • ASP.NET MVC is open source, and so is Mono.

        • by h4rr4r (612664)

          Real only license, patent encumbered and in the real world people include lots of closed source stuff when using it.

          It is open only in the loosest sense. Mono is aptly named after a disease.

          • I think

            Mono is aptly named after a disease.

            was a joke. This being Slashdot, I can't be sure, though. Just in case, for the record it's called "Mono" because "mono" means "monkey" in Spanish, and Miguel de Icaza thinks monkeys are neat.

          • Real only license,

            I'm not sure what a "Real only license" is, so I assume you meant to write "read-only".

            Even then it doesn't make any sense to me, because Mono is GPL and LGPL, and ASP.NET MVC is under Ms-PL; the latter is considered a "free software license" by FSF (it's effectively BSDL + patent clause). Neither are "read-only" in any meaningful sense.

            in the real world people include lots of closed source stuff when using it.

            In real world, most people who use Linux also use proprietary closed-source NVidia graphics drivers. That's because, in real world, most people are pragmatists and not fanat

    • Yeah, I got all excited about this and followed the link only to find out it's for .NET. Boo.
  • any web platform? (Score:5, Informative)

    by farnsworth (558449) on Thursday June 09, 2011 @03:46PM (#36392754)

    'best and most comprehensive production web page profiler out there for any web platform.'

    That's a little bit misleading. This project is basically instrumentation that you add to an asp.net 4.0 webapp. It does not seem to be usable by any other kind of webapp. It doesn't even look like it would be easy to port to the other major platforms.

    • Is your sig a quote from something or original? I kinda like it.

      • Is your sig a quote from something or original? I kinda like it.

        It's a line from Raising Arizona.

    • by Zancarius (414244)

      I also have to take issue with the blog author's responses to comments related to this profiler. About seven comments down he writes:

      Code is easy. Ideas are hard.

      That's probably one of the most ludicrous things I've seen. Ideas are not hard. They're easy. Want some examples?

      I have an idea: Let's go to the moon.

      I have an idea: Let's go to Mars.

      I have an idea: Let's come up with clean, plentiful energy.

      I realize I'm nitpicking, but the way he should have written it is:

      Code is easy. Ideas are easy. Implementat

      • Architecture is hard. Or more correctly, choosing the "correct" architecture is hard. If you pick the architecture well, implementation may be time consuming but hopefully isn't "hard."

        • by Zancarius (414244)

          Also a good point.

          I suppose one of the problems with nitpicking is that it is exceedingly easy to blur the lines between one facet of the development process and another. From an extremely high level view, I would probably argue that ideas live on one end of the spectrum and coding, implementation, and--as you suggested--architecture live on the other.

          But, since you replied, I would assume that you understood the gist of my point which was that ideas are not the hard part by any stretch of the imagination.

          • Yeah for sure. I should have said that you made good points up front. I was just trying to contribute, but there is so much stupid sniping on /. that it doesn't go without saying!

            • by Zancarius (414244)

              Yeah for sure. I should have said that you made good points up front. I was just trying to contribute, but there is so much stupid sniping on /. that it doesn't go without saying!

              Yeah, definitely. I appreciate your additions (and deserved corrections) to my complaints about the article's author and his comments. I owe you an apology for my somewhat defensive reply for reasons you undoubtedly understand. In fact, you pointed it out! There's really no excuse for my defensive behavior.

              Along those lines, I appr

  • by Hobart (32767) on Thursday June 09, 2011 @03:48PM (#36392776) Homepage Journal
    It is nice that these utilities are part of a growing amount of open source .NET code (like Apache's efforts helped grow F/LOSS software for Java). That said, those who want to support a Q&A community running on Free code can look at:
    • Wow, Shapado looks exactly StackExchange. I'm assuming that's legal and all (didn't check the licenses), but it sure is in poor taste.

      • Wow, Shapado looks exactly StackExchange. I'm assuming that's legal and all (didn't check the licenses), but it sure is in poor taste.

        Wow, GNU/Linux looks exactly like UNIX. I'm assuming that's legal and all (didn't check the licenses), but it sure is in poor taste.

        Wow, Quattro Pro looks exactly like 1-2-3. I'm sure this one is legal (even checked the US Supreme Court decision [wikipedia.org]), but it sure is in poor taste.

        • Your sarcasm is duly noted.

          Legality of course has nothing to do with taste. Is the fact that Linux and its associates are copies of UNIX in poor taste? Yes, initially; I'd say so. Programmers are rarely known for their taste (nor, I think, should they be expected to be; that's not what we—read: society at large—expects from them. Still, nothing fluffs your bona fides like success, so is Linux in poor taste now? Doubtful.

          As for spreadsheets, I'm glad Lotus and Borland got that settled before

          • by Zancarius (414244)

            tepples may have a history of sarcastic responses, and there are times when I often disagree with what he has to post, but he gets his point across.

            In this case, I tend to agree with his sarcasm. The fact that you aren't appreciative of it is awful telling--never mind that you feel GNU/Linux being a copy of UNIX to be (initially) in poor taste.

            Yes, 1-to-1 knockoffs are generally bad, generally in poor taste, and generally the result of a) lack of skill and/or creativity, 2) familiarity, or 3) so great an in

            • If tepples has such a history, I wasn't aware of it; I was only responding to his post. Nor was I unappreciative—quite the opposite: I took his point, though obviously I don't entirely agree with it. I am the better for examining points in opposition to my own.

              That said, I don't disagree with what you wrote otherwise, and I'll certainly grant that familiarity is often—usually—an overriding concern. I don't think that nullifies whether or not something is in poor taste or not, however.

              • by Zancarius (414244)

                I have him friended because I find his posts pretty entertaining (I use the friend system on /. as a glorified "hey, I like this person's posts" filter), and perhaps I would have been better off classifying his comment history as "snarky" more than sarcastic. Either way, I get a great deal of enjoyment out of it even if I completely disagree with the point he's making, but I think that's largely because a lot of people are unnecessarily touchy. :)

                That said, I don't disagree with what you wrote otherwise, an

  • Many of the commenters seem pretty cranky, but I am very excited by this tool, it's exactly what I need and very nicely put together. I'll certainly be weaving it into my project. It shows the same dense but tight information presentation, use of AJAX techniques, and clean, modern web coding techniques that makes Stack Overflow so popular in the first place.

  • Too bad I read the title as "Stock Exchange Website Profiler" and thought that someone had open sourced years of mining and forecasting stock information for the public to collaborate on.

    Back on topic, this is quite interesting as well.

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