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Java Open Source Oracle Programming Apache

Oracle's Java Policies Are Destroying the Community 314

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the shares-in-haskell-inc-up-ten-points dept.
snydeq writes "Neil McAllister sees Oracle's buggy Java SE 7 release as only the latest misstep in a mounting litany of bad behavior. 'Who was the first to alert the Java community? The Apache Foundation. Oh, the irony. This is the same Apache Foundation that resigned from the Java Community Process executive committee in protest after Oracle repeatedly refused to give it access to the Java Technology Compatibility Kit,' McAllister writes. 'It seems as if Oracle would like nothing better than to stomp Apache and its open source Java efforts clean out of existence.'"
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Oracle's Java Policies Are Destroying the Community

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 04, 2011 @11:04AM (#36985914)

    Really, who didn't see this coming?

  • Round 1. Fight. (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 04, 2011 @11:05AM (#36985932)

    We have the last Java 7 preview (GPL).

    Fork the darn thing and see who lives.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday August 04, 2011 @11:15AM (#36986058)

    MySQL, you're next!

  • Re:Round 1. Fight. (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Anrego (830717) * on Thursday August 04, 2011 @11:21AM (#36986138)

    Fork the darn thing and see who lives.

    With their war chest of patents.. they could litigate any serious competitor into the ground.

    Now whether they have any reason to do so is another question.

    Personally I'd start transitioning away from Java at this point if possible/practical. It's a shame because it worked really well in a lot of situations :(

  • by Short Circuit (52384) <mikemol@gmail.com> on Thursday August 04, 2011 @11:23AM (#36986172) Homepage Journal

    Really, who didn't see this coming?

    This isn't a news article. This is an article about two previous [slashdot.org] news articles [slashdot.org]. There's nothing to see coming. Submitted by the author of an article about the two previous stories. Slow news day, I hope; this is just a group-think trajectory thing.

  • by Richard_at_work (517087) <richardprice&gmail,com> on Thursday August 04, 2011 @11:47AM (#36986510)

    Its amazing how far a single article of FUD goes these days - Microsoft is not "going soft" on .Net, they just weren't willing to discuss it during a talk about something else entirely, while in Windows 8, .Net is still there and stronger than ever.

    As I recall the Sun/Microsoft suit prohibited Microsoft from having their own Java implementation, is Microsoft now going to license Java from Oracle as the .NET replacement

    Microsoft already have a licensing deal with Sun/Oracle in place for .Net - it was pursued years ago, at the very birth of .Net. And besides, what would Microsoft gain from going to Java? Functionality wise, .Net is better featured so what would Microsoft gain from switching ecosystems? Not a whole lot.

    Microsoft don't want Java, they already made their version of it and are quite happy with it.

  • by Applekid (993327) on Thursday August 04, 2011 @11:48AM (#36986544)

    OP didn't claim it was dead. It sounded to me like he *wanted* it dead. Add me to that list please.

    Wait, this is America, and people spent money in College learning it. Perhaps the government should subsidy the language and offer incentives to companies that hire these people...

    - Dan.

    My sarcasm detector needs calibration, but, in the meantime, those who spent money in college learning a language and not the concepts behind the language got ripped off. Give fish vs teach fishing and all that jazz.

  • by Idaho (12907) on Thursday August 04, 2011 @12:54PM (#36987462)

    Its amazing how far a single article of FUD goes these days - Microsoft is not "going soft" on .Net, they just weren't willing to discuss it during a talk about something else entirely, while in Windows 8, .Net is still there and stronger than ever.

    "Stronger than ever" how?

    Rather, it's amazing that .NET made it this far, while Microsoft itself (apart from its development division) hasn't used it for basically anything (that was released, anyway), also clearly won't in the future, and it's clear that the Windows group upper management hates it.

    That's not FUD, that's just facing facts.

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