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C/C++ Back On Top of the Programming Heap? 611

Posted by timothy
from the where's-the-future's-market? dept.
Drethon writes "On this day in 2008, a submission was posted that C/C++ was losing ground so I decided to check out its current state. It seems that C has returned to the top while Java has dropped by the same amount, VB and PHP have dropped drastically, C++ is holding fast but now in third place and Objective-C and C# have climbed quite a bit. 2008 data thanks to SatanicPuppy: 1. Java (20.5%); 2. C (.14.7%); 3. VB (11.6%); 4. PHP (10.3%); 5. C++ (9.9%); 6. Perl (5.9%); 7. Python (4.5%); 8. C# (.3.8%); 9. Ruby(2.9%); 10. Delphi (2.7%). The other 10 in the top 20 are: JavaScript, D, PL/SQL, SAS, Pascal, Lisp/Scheme, FoxPro/xBase, COBOL, Ada, and ColdFusion."
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C/C++ Back On Top of the Programming Heap?

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  • Windows kernel is C (Score:5, Informative)

    by Comboman (895500) on Tuesday April 24, 2012 @09:24AM (#39781499)

    The Windows OS kernel is mostly in C with some assembly (just like Unix/Linux/BSD/OSX). The Windows GUI is mostly C++ (but so is KDE).

  • Re:Eh? (Score:5, Informative)

    by FrootLoops (1817694) on Tuesday April 24, 2012 @09:37AM (#39781687)

    The site was loading very slowly so I scraped the 2012 rankings for the curious but impatient:

    1 - C - 17.555%
    2 - Java - 17.026%
    3 - C++ - 8.896%
    4 - Objective-C - 8.236%
    5 - C# - 7.348%
    6 - PHP - 5.288%
    7 - (Visual) Basic - 4.962%
    8 - Python - 3.665%
    9 - JavaScript - 2.879%
    10 - Perl - 2.387%
    11 - Ruby - 1.510%
    12 - PL/SQL - 1.373%
    13 - Delphi/Object Pascal - 1.370%
    14 - Visual Basic .NET - 0.978%
    15 - Lisp - 0.951%
    16 - Pascal - 0.812%
    17 - Ada - 0.783%
    18 - Transact-SQL - 0.760%
    19 - Logo - 0.652%
    20 - NXT-G - 0.578%

  • Re:Buffer overflow (Score:5, Informative)

    by Imagix (695350) on Tuesday April 24, 2012 @09:52AM (#39781863)

    now that C++ will get move semantics

    Not will, _has_ move semantics. As of last August.

  • by Black Parrot (19622) on Tuesday April 24, 2012 @10:13AM (#39782151)

    Higher level languages tend to help minimize *developer* time, at the expense of run-time.

    If you're really interested in run time, you should be more concerned with asymptotic ("big-O") performance rather than basic code efficiency.

    Also, no amount of speed-up makes up for code that is wrong. The proper reason for choosing a higher-level language is that its readability contributes to correctness.

  • by Richard_at_work (517087) <richardprice AT gmail DOT com> on Tuesday April 24, 2012 @11:09AM (#39783027)

    It depends what you are doing with it - in the server space, .Net is used all over the place (Dynamics CRM, SharePoint, SQL Server, Exchange - all have a dependency on .Net these days).

  • by davidoff404 (764733) on Tuesday April 24, 2012 @01:14PM (#39785065)

    Except that Boost is an unholy mess designed by students who threw in everything they thought would be cool without a decent overall approach.

    This, in a nutshell, is why Slashdot is Slashdot:

    1) Ill-informed commenter makes absolutely fucking ludicrous claim about library he clearly has never used.

    2) Similarly ill-informed modders mod said comment up, presumably because they dislike anything that's not Javascript, feel frightened by "real" code, or are just having a bad day in their mom's basement

    3) Rinse and repeat.

It was kinda like stuffing the wrong card in a computer, when you're stickin' those artificial stimulants in your arm. -- Dion, noted computer scientist

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