Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
GUI Programming

The History of Visual Development Environments 181

Posted by timothy
from the some-people-still-prefer-text-y'know dept.
Esther Schindler writes "There was a time when programs were written in text editors. And when competition between C++ vendors was actually fierce. Step into the time travel machine as Andy Patrizio revisits the evolution and impact of the visual development metaphor. 'Visual development in its earliest stages was limited by what the PC could do. But for the IBM PC in the early 1980s, with its single-tasking operating system and 8- or 16-bit hardware, the previous software development process was text edit, compile, write down the errors, and debug with your eyes.' Where do you start? 'While TurboPascal launched the idea of an integrated development environment, [Jeff] Duntemann credits Microsoft's Visual Basic (VB), launched in 1991, with being the first real IDE.'... And yes, there's plenty more." A comment attached to the story lists two IDEs that preceded VB; can you name others?
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

The History of Visual Development Environments

Comments Filter:
  • QuickBasic (Score:4, Informative)

    by adonoman (624929) on Tuesday February 05, 2013 @10:09AM (#42796665)
    QuickBasic was already at v4.5 in 1988 - 3 years before Visual Basic.
  • Seriously? (Score:5, Informative)

    by 0xdeadbeef (28836) on Tuesday February 05, 2013 @10:54AM (#42797181) Homepage Journal

    While TurboPascal launched the idea of an integrated development environment, [Jeff] Duntemann credits Microsoft's Visual Basic (VB), launched in 1991, with being the first real IDE

    Which makes him a retard. Form designers are not the primary component of IDEs, nor are they necessary to be called an IDE.

  • Earlier IDEs (Score:4, Informative)

    by dpbsmith (263124) on Tuesday February 05, 2013 @11:46AM (#42797937) Homepage

    Without even trying to do any historic digging:

    Asymetrix Toolbook shipped "with" Windows well before VB. In fact the company I worked for foolishly assumed it was "part of" Windows. Toolbook, in turn, was not exactly a knockoff of HyperCard, but was certainly a member of the same genre.

    LabView for the Macintosh shipped in 1986, and not only still exists but has a very solid niche in some circles. LabView is such a pure visual IDE that there are not visible lines of code as such; it is all wiring diagrams.

    Bill Budge's 1983 Pinball Construction Set, for the Apple ][ and Atari, was certainly an IDE, although for a restricted class of applications.

    Incidentally, it seems to me that the later incarnations of Visual Studio are considerably less "integrated" than the original Visual Basic was. Visual Studio has the feeling to me of being no more "integrated" than, say, Borland C++ or the (1985) MacPascal. Unlike VB, it just had a fairly crude resource-editor-like "drawing" environment. It feels OK when you're creating things for the first time, but the visual objects do not really "contain" code--they have a very loose and fragile connection to the code associated with them.

What this country needs is a dime that will buy a good five-cent bagel.

Working...