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The Almighty Buck Open Source

Funding Open Source By Donations: Lighting the Path 56

Posted by timothy
from the getting-things-done dept.
New submitter BryanLunduke writes "One week ago I Open Sourced my — previously commercial — software (GPL) and comic books (creative commons). I am now documenting my journey to fully fund their continued development with the first week's results of funding via donations. I am publishing this information here to give others the facts they need to help decide if they can afford to do something similar."
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Funding Open Source By Donations: Lighting the Path

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  • step one (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday June 01, 2013 @01:41AM (#43881257)

    have a better track record than bryan lunduke.

    http://www.thepowerbase.com/2012/06/pulling-a-lunduke-holding-source-code-hostage/

    this same guy has been discussed here at /. previously

    http://news.slashdot.org/story/13/02/07/028253/ask-slashdot-can-closed-source-software-transition-to-the-gpl-successfully

  • Ahead of our time (Score:5, Interesting)

    by sqrt(2) (786011) on Saturday June 01, 2013 @02:30AM (#43881377) Journal

    FLOSS might actually turn out to be, in the long view of human existence and intellectual development, vastly ahead of its time.

    FLOSS, henceforth "open source" as this term is far more linguistically charming regardless of legalistic accuracy, is a mindset and way of conducting one's life that might actually be too soon in coming. It appear at once to be imminently practical, fair, and compassionate. Who among us that wishes good for all mankind would want otherwise for their life's work? Yet this very question belies the problem inherit therein: the creators do in fact have a lifetime, temporally finite in a way which is not of their own choosing. Death is, currently, a certainty, which makes the human work-hour a unit of absolute importance if we are to value anything at all. It is from this work-hour from which our ability to support offspring comes--a topic I have heard Mr. Lunduke speak of adamantly to a certain RMS. Certainly he has the right to provide for his children and relatives, yet all would also assert society does not have the obligation to same. Whence comes the compromise? It is, of course, to be found in the production of useful work unique to said individual. A program is paid for his work sufficiently only because his work is sufficiently difficult to perform.

    But what happens when it is not? This conversation is not even ongoing in our society. We are not even considering a world when humans are eclipsed by machines, automation, and computation. We are not even having the conversation of what society will look like when all but the most brilliant among us are capable of performing useful work.

    Open source is a brilliant lurch toward the end state of utopia, but it does nothing to connect the dots from our current state to that promised land. These problems will be solved by thinkers greater than I or Lunduke or perhaps anyone else currently living, but they either will be solved or the human race will stagnate or regress to feudalism.

    I hope for progress, efficiency, and a preservation of the human spirit manifest in expressions of beauty, art, order, and exquisitely flawed form. What philosophy guides us thus? What but Open Source, the sharing of the structure of life and the universe itself, can even prepare us for this nirvana? It isn't a question of whether open source is better than the alternatives, it is a question of whether open source is better than abject failure and darkness.

    It is.

The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not "Eureka!" (I found it!) but "That's funny ..." -- Isaac Asimov

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