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Oracle Reinstates Free Time Zone Updates For Java 7 61

Posted by timothy
from the mistakes-were-made dept.
twofishy writes "The internet has been buzzing this week with the news that Oracle has ceased to provide free time zone updates outside of the standard JDK release cycle. However, at the end of yesterday the firm appeared to have a change of heart. 'We never intended for a support contract to be required to keep JDK 7 up to date. TZUpdater was made unavailable on March 8 as part of the End of Public Updates for JDK 6, and as soon as we learned that this affected JDK 7 users we initiated the process of making it available for JDK 7 again.'"
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Oracle Reinstates Free Time Zone Updates For Java 7

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  • See? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) on Tuesday June 11, 2013 @11:52AM (#43974357)
    All you people who think Oracle is the embodiment of evil and Larry Ellison is the devil incarnate are... ...absolutely right.
  • Oracle is really getting on my nerves. Of-course this has been the case for the last 5 years or so, but now it's especially egregious.

    Obviously they can't handle Java, they just don't know what to do with it. Suggestion: pull your heads out of your asses and if you can't handle this asset, give it up. Sell it or hand it over to Apache foundation, whatever. The more you DO the worse you LOOK because you are dumbshits.

    • by JDG1980 (2438906)

      Obviously they can't handle Java, they just don't know what to do with it. Suggestion: pull your heads out of your asses and if you can't handle this asset, give it up. Sell it or hand it over to Apache foundation, whatever. The more you DO the worse you LOOK because you are dumbshits.

      They don't care about Java, just the underlying patents. The only reason Oracle bought Sun was so they could use their patents to hassle Google and other companies.

      • And the patents are useless now. So why not sell Java for somebody that can keep its value, instead of using all their energy to depreciate it?

  • Updates (Score:5, Interesting)

    by LizardKing (5245) on Tuesday June 11, 2013 @11:54AM (#43974397)

    We never intended for a support contract to be required to keep JDK 7 up to date

    Then provide bloody YUM and APT repos for easy upgrading on RedHat, CentOS and Debian based systems. Even Adobe can manage that for the poxy Flash plugin.

    • flashplugin-nonfree.deb is actually just a set of wrapper scripts that downloads Flash from Adobe's site, not a proper Flash install package as such. Adobe is so dreadful that they won't even let you download the .msi(for the platform they actually care about) without signing some stupid 'redistribution agreement' and going through a(trivial) approval process to get the magic URL...

      • Do they just not like debian? On my laptop:

        [~]$ rpm -q flash-plugin
        flash-plugin-11.2.202.285-release.x86_64

        [~]$ rpm -q --filesbypkg flash-plugin
        flash-plugin /usr/bin/flash-player-properties
        flash-plugin /usr/lib64/flash-plugin
        flash-plugin /usr/lib64/flash-plugin/LICENSE
        flash-plugin /usr/lib64/flash-plugin/README
        flash-plugin /usr/lib64/flash-plugin/homecleanup
        flash-plugin /usr/lib64/flash-plugin/libflashplayer.so
        flash-plugin /usr/lib64/flash-plugin/setup
        flash-plugin /usr/lib64/kde4/kcm_adobe_flash_p

        • by julesh (229690)

          See discussion on debian.legal here [debian.org] for detail, but the general gist is that Adobe recently changed their terms; the package you link was released after that change, but debian tends to value stability more than most other Linux distros and therefore does not yet include a version of flash that dates from after the change in licensing terms.

          Adobe also grant redistribution permission to named organisations, which may have allowed some Linux distros to include it previously, but debian is unable/reluctant to

  • Translation... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by msauve (701917) on Tuesday June 11, 2013 @11:58AM (#43974453)
    "as soon as we learned that this affected JDK 7 users we initiated the process of making it available for JDK 7 again."

    Translation: we bought this thing, but we don't know how it works.
  • backpedaling (Score:5, Insightful)

    by j00r0m4nc3r (959816) on Tuesday June 11, 2013 @12:12PM (#43974631)
    "'We never intended for a support contract to be required to keep JDK 7 up to date."

    Bullshit.
    • Precisely.They backpedaled so fast that they are now tripping over their own feet-and lying tongues.

    • by AndyCater (726464)

      I don't have a business support contract with Oracle - I don't actually have any obviously Oracle products here at the moment.

      If I _DID_ have a business support contract with Oracle for any product, I think thiis would persuade me that my money was wasted: this sort of little thing drags down a big business reputation. Oracle may have fantastic databases, middleware, people management software, hardware, Linux OS, Java - in rough order of importance to Oracle - but this shows that they can't be trusted to d

  • by Todd Knarr (15451) on Tuesday June 11, 2013 @12:38PM (#43975045) Homepage

    Seriously, they have nobody reviewing these things? That scares me more than the idea that it was deliberate.

    Meanwhile, what I want isn't actually tzupdater. What I want's a tool that'll automatically pull down, compile and install the latest tzdata package from IANA into all JRE/JDK installations in the standard locations. The compile and install parts are already there, just need the download part and a search for folders to install in.

    • by MoFoQ (584566)

      sadly, I agree.

      The original post [slashdot.org] about it referred to a page regarding Java6 (which I understand if Oracle wants to EoL it to force most to go with Java7).

      Also, from the looks, that original link in that post no longer refers to TZUpdater for Java6 being discontinued but rather says that it is for Java7:
      http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/tzupdater-download-513681.html [oracle.com]
      Oh English...better to say what it is for than to say what it is not for, especially after it gets slashdotted.

      • by Todd Knarr (15451)

        As near as I can tell, what happened is:

        • Java 6 is EOL'd.
        • Someone was assigned to go through and clean up all the loose ends from Java 6, move them away from public access and into the paid-support area. Reasonable, J6 isn't supported and people should be discouraged from depending on it.
        • tzupdater is listed under Java 6, so got flagged for cleanup.
        • Nobody twigged to the fact that tzupdater, while listed under J6, is actually version-agnostic and applies to Java 5 through 7 (they all use the same format for z
  • Why does Java need its own tzdata instead of using what the OS provides?

    • Re:Dumb question: (Score:4, Informative)

      by Chibi Merrow (226057) <[ten.ytinifniyeknom] [ta] [worremrm]> on Tuesday June 11, 2013 @02:58PM (#43976933) Homepage Journal

      So that the Java Calendar objects provide consistent(ly bad) behavior across all platforms.

      Not really a dumb question, just have to understand that's a design goal for Java: to abstract away anything platform specific.

    • by jonwil (467024)

      Because not all OSs provide the time zone data in the same format... Take Windows for example, how do you get at the time zone data on that platform? (not just the current time zone as set under "date and time" but all the time zone data and settings including historical information)

      • Take Windows for example, how do you get at the time zone data on that platform? (not just the current time zone as set under "date and time" but all the time zone data and settings including historical information)

        By developing OS-specific ways to retrieve that information? They already do this for plenty of others things (most low level APIs).

  • We never intended for a support contract to be required to keep JDK 7 up to date.

    But you, Oracle, WILL intend in the future. Just like you intend today for a support contract to be required to keep JDK 6 AND JRE6 up to date.

    Even though most Java software is probably built against JRE6, and incompatible with JRE7.

    JDK7 is still just a way of pressuring a lot of people to pay for a support contract, because they need their critical security fixes for JRE6, to keep running their applications.

    The

    • Even though most Java software is probably built against JRE6, and incompatible with JRE7.

      Java 6 bytecode runs perfectly fine on JRE7

      JDK7 is still just a way of pressuring a lot of people to pay for a support contract, because they need their critical security fixes for JRE6, to keep running their applications.

      Support contract? Updates for the JDK are freeware, and the there's always OpenJDK.

      • by mysidia (191772)

        Java 6 bytecode runs perfectly fine on JRE7

        The APIs differ sufficiently that a non-trivial app legacy built for JRE 6 cannot be run on JRE 7.

        They may be compatible in theory, but not in practice; not by a long shot.

        Support contract? Updates for the JDK are freeware, and the there's always OpenJDK.

        The older JRE is "EOL" entirely; no new security updates or other fixes are released to the public, BUT if you have a support contract for your older Java software, you still do get the fixes and updat

  • Java is (to me) a neutral issue. What's truly alarming is Oracle's treating of every ecosystem it comes upon as gold to be mined. Not *everything* in the world is a Larry Ellison piggy bank.

  • Just let it go. C#, C++, Javascript and Objective-C are the future.

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