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Perl Programming

Perl 5.20 Released, and Mojolicious 5.0: the Very Modern Perl Web Framework 126

Posted by Soulskill
from the also-ready-for-prime-time dept.
Kvorg writes: "Back in 2012 Slashdot noticed how at the time of Perl 5.16, the modern Perl projects, including Mojolicious, formed a new and expanding movement of a Perl Renaissance. With the release of Perl 5.20 and Mojolicious 5.0, the Modern Perl Renaissance is ever more striking. Faster, neater, sharper with its asynchronous APIs, Mojolicious is extremely flexible with its advanced request routing, plugin system, perl templating and hook API. Its adherence to the modern interfaces and standards and its implementation of advanced features in support tools, DOM and CSS selectors makes it easy to program with.

Mojolicious, with its philosophy of optimized code-generation (think metaprogramming), enabled-by-default support for encodings and UTF-8, zero dependency deployment with wide support for existing CPAN packages, zero downtime restarts and fully tested implementations, reminds us of how fun and flexible programming in scripting languages used to be. Of course, integrated documentation and a very supportive bundled development server don't hurt, either. The new Perl release with new postfix dereference syntax, subroutine signatures, new slice syntax and numerous optimizations makes it all even more fun."
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Perl 5.20 Released, and Mojolicious 5.0: the Very Modern Perl Web Framework

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  • by Penguinisto (415985) on Friday May 30, 2014 @11:45AM (#47129197) Journal

    I kept thinking "I am the very model of a modern Major Perl Framework..."

    • by gstoddart (321705)

      LOL ...

      I'm very well acquainted, too, with matters mathematical,
      I understand equations, both the simple and quadratical,

      Somewhat apropos, really.

      • by Talderas (1212466)

        About binomial theorem I'm teeming with a lot of news
        With many cheerful facts about the square of the hypoteneus

    • I think being old is a requirement for understanding TFS. :-)

    • by Tackhead (54550) on Friday May 30, 2014 @01:25PM (#47130029)

      I kept thinking "I am the very model of a modern Major Perl Framework..."

      I am the very model of a modern Major Perl Framework,
      But here I am on Slashdot, trying harder from my job to shirk,
      From HackerNews to 4chan there's no forum in which I won't lurk,
      I am the very model of a modern Major Perl Framework!

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Color me surprised.

  • Awesome! (Score:5, Interesting)

    by just_another_sean (919159) on Friday May 30, 2014 @11:46AM (#47129213) Homepage Journal

    I don't much care about what a lot of people think about it, I love Perl and still use it daily in my job. I've dabbled in PHP and the various frameworks it supports but I always find myself returning to Perl/CGI/DBI. But this sounds like something I have been waiting for. It's really nice to see some new stuff coming out for Perl 5 as I simply can't seem to wrap my head around Perl 6. This is great news for old dogs!

    • Maybe one day even Slashdot will get UTF-8 support.

      One day.

      Any decade now.

      • Huh? Still no UTF-8 support? Damn. A couple years ago they hired a hotshot perl programmer with 30 years of UTF-8 experience to implement it. Hired him off Dice.com, in fact. Oh, hmmm. Well, ASCII is good enough.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by walkeraj (1234310)
      Perl 6, what's that? Seriously though, it's nice to see p5 undergoing productive changes as the grand wait for Perl 6 wears on and as it becomes more clear that the Perl 6 we're getting might not be the one we wanted. Having said that, I find it annoying that the focus on backwards compatibility hamstrings new features to the degree that everything is marked as unstable or experimental and we're left just writing the same damn old perl 5 we've been writing for years. We keep dancing around the issue, but
      • Re:Awesome! (Score:4, Informative)

        by preaction (1526109) on Friday May 30, 2014 @01:38PM (#47130149)

        The p5p (Perl 5 Porters, the main p5 dev group) are removing a bunch of cruft. Old OSes and EBCDIC are up on the chopping block next. They're also removing microperl, which unfortunately probably is the best chance of getting more than perl to parse Perl (microperl removes just about every OS-specific function of Perl, like the unix user/group/passwd file stuff).

        But honestly, there's so few people working in the core code, and I don't imagine any of the major forks I've heard about gaining any steam either.

      • More than likely, I don't expect Perl 6 to ever see light of day. The big problem with it is that it's not Perl.

        I don't have a huge problem with a new scripting language, but recognize that it's (for all useful purposes) something new and different and give the project a new name. Also, Perl 5 is AFAICT completely backwards compatible to at least Perl 3; Perl 6 either won't run prior code or requires a huge hack to do so.

    • Perl 6 is the language of the future and always will be.
  • I was using perl before it was cool.

    (I figured a fanboi submission required a hipster response)

    • by CaptSlaq (1491233)

      I was using perl before it was cool.

      (I figured a fanboi submission required a hipster response)

      Perl was cool? Seems that it's never been since I started using it in 2000.

  • by duckgod (2664193) on Friday May 30, 2014 @12:46PM (#47129677)
    The thing that I have always loved about perl is the "there's more than one way to do it" philosophy. Perl lets me do whatever the fuck I want. If I am doing a project for my own enjoyment then I will do whatever I want that gets the job done the fastest. Yes maybe this makes it a bad language for large groups and production applications where programmers need to have restraints in order for the group to work harmoniously. But I am an adult and I don't want to be told what is right or wrong way to do something in my home.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday May 30, 2014 @03:16PM (#47131059)

      That's one side of perl: The fastest development time imaginable for small programs. The other side, that no one has mentioned, is that perl conforms to the OO paradigm more closely than any other language (including Objective-C.) I have written very large programs in perl and contrary to popular opinion these programs are much easier to read and understand than if they were written in C++ for example.

      • by mooingyak (720677)

        The other side, that no one has mentioned, is that perl conforms to the OO paradigm more closely than any other language

        Except for nearly all of the other ones? Especially other scripting languages?

        Pick a bunch of languages at random. Stick them on a dartboard. Throw something gigantic at the dartboard. Chances are every language you hit conforms to the OO paradigm more closely than perl.

        I can write object-oriented assembly. That doesn't make it a particularly OOPy language. Perl objects are hacked on, somewhat painfully at that.

  • by LF11 (18760) on Friday May 30, 2014 @12:49PM (#47129705) Homepage
    ...the Next Great Web Language ends up being PERL? Yes, please.

    It has a lot going for it, especially if a project like this makes it as approachable as PHP for web application development.

    Serious question, though: other than it being old, are there any problems that keep it from being viable as a modern web application platform?
    • by Anonymous Coward

      Serious question, though: other than it being old, are there any problems that keep it from being viable as a modern web application platform?

      Yes. Not technical ones, though. Everyone has been flaming it for so long that it's no longer hip. (Sigh.)

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Yes. Not technical ones, though. Everyone has been flaming it for so long that it's no longer hip. (Sigh.)

        The problem is that Perl (like C) requires discipline. It is possible to write well written and architected code in any language. But some languages make it harder than others. But some languages (Java, I'm looking at you) are designed to coddle programmers from doing things they shouldn't. It's silly because engineers should know their craft and not require a nanny in the form of a purposely limited la

      • ehh, I tried using perl for a small "modern" (REST) backend, gave up and used ruby/sinatra/mod_passenger because it worked. Perl? Dancer looked nice but there are too many dependencies. CGI is hopelessly obselete (does /. still run on it?). I implemented my own microwebframework on top of CGI (a hundred lines or so to do routing) before I discovered passenger and switched to that.

        I'd take perl over node anytime but I'm not impressed by CPAN (it's better than npm, if you want some faint praise) and a lo

        • Dancer was inspired by Sinatra, but if you wanted something close to the metal, you wanted Plack (like Rack or WSGI). But really, you wanted Mojolicious.

          Dependencies are not a bad thing. CPANTS makes sure they work. But if you don't like dependencies, you wanted Mojolicious.

        • by draven (387)

          I think it's interesting that you didn't mention Mojolicious, which has your dependency problem from Dancer sorted, and is also a quite modern rethinking of HTTP on Perl. None of the old cruft from the 90s.

  • Oxymoron (Score:2, Insightful)

    Ok, I know I'll get modded down to oblivion for this, but my first thought on reading the headline was "Modern Perl Web Framework, isn't that an oxymoron?" Any others think that as a reflex at first too? Even if you don't really believe it?

    I know I used to love Perl, but that was a long time ago...

    • Re:Oxymoron (Score:5, Interesting)

      by jjn1056 (85209) <jjn1056.yahoo@com> on Friday May 30, 2014 @04:01PM (#47131557) Homepage Journal

      Given I'll make more that $200K programming Perl this year, no that was not my first reflex...

      My first reflex on seeing this on Slashdot was, "I probably shouldn't read the article because its going to be filled with the same tired, ignorant Perl hate. And then I'm going to waste time trying to respond to it."

      You don't have to use Perl if you don't want to. Why isn't that enough? Why do you feel entitled to dump your FUD on my community? Perl isn't the most popular choice but there's a lot of us making a decent living at it, so please if you don't get it, or you don't like it, unless you have a grudge with Perl that hasn't already been mentioned 100K times what's the point of saying anything at all?

      • Why do you feel entitled to dump your FUD on my community?

        This wasn't meant as FUD, just good natured jibing. Relax :D

        Perl isn't the most popular choice but there's a lot of us making a decent living at it, so please if you don't get it, or you don't like it, unless you have a grudge with Perl that hasn't already been mentioned 100K times what's the point of saying anything at all?

        I don't doubt it. I have no hate for Perl, I was joking. Notice how many qualifies I put on my statements? It was just the first thing that popped into my head when I read a slashdot headline, no biggie.

  • Welcome back into the Middle Age.
  • by TheRealHocusLocus (2319802) on Friday May 30, 2014 @09:07PM (#47133561)

    Perl Festivity Level 1: Developers and users have gathered to nibble hors d'oeuvres and chat amiably with each other about the Modern Perl Renaissance. With every sip of their drinks Perl seems ever more striking. Some are gathered around the upright piano improvising songs that proclaim how it is faster, neater, and sharper than ever before with its asynchronous APIs.

    Perl Festivity Level 2: Everyone is talking loudly -- sometimes to each other, and sometimes to nobody at all. Perl seems even better. Perl Monks are patiently explaining syntax and style to potted plants and other nearby objects. Around the piano people are feeling fun and flexible, just as programming in scripting languages used to be. Someone is crooning a bawdy ballad where a couple of inexperienced DOM and CSS selectors encounter a very supportive bundled development server.

    Perl Festivity Level 3: Monks are arguing violently and defrocking one another over nested do...until loops that bail on exceptions. People are gulping down other peoples' drinks, placing hors d'oeuvres in the upright piano to see what happens when the little hammers strike as everyone bawls "Got my Mojolicious workin' ... but it don't work on Python!" They have lost count of their drinks, and the world is harmonious with blissful adherence to modern interfaces and standards.

    Perl Festivity Level 4: All the guests, hors d'oeuvres smeared all over their naked bodies are performing a ritual dance around a burning heap of tables and chairs in celebration of postfix dereference syntax, subroutine signatures, new slice syntax and numerous optimizations. The piano is missing.

    ~~ with apology and deference to Dave Barry [cmu.edu]

  • I was very active back in the early days of 5.0 development. I fought for this and lost.

    I always struggled with the non-nonsensical @{} ${} ..... style. It was difficult to mentally process. Long chains of dereferencing would be especially complicated.

    I'm very pleased to see this finally make it in.

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