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Handhelds Security Hardware

PuTTY Beta For Symbian OS 51

Mithix writes "Gizmodo is reporting that the popular (and free) SSH client PuTTY is now in beta for Symbian OS, the OS of choice for the Nokia Series 60, the Nokia 9200 Communicator Series, and the N-Gage. Finally, something redeeming for the N-Gage?"
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PuTTY Beta For Symbian OS

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  • But I'm still not buying an Ngage.
    • Re:PuTTY is awesome! (Score:1, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Not really sure what was informative about this parent but ...

      I recently got an N-Gage (two weeks ago at EB).
      It was $200 with three games and an extra battery.

      I didn't buy it for the games in any way what so ever. I bought it because it was a cheap, high-end (bluetooth) phone. It also supported IMAP over SSL and SMTP-Auth over SSL which were neat. It has usable PIM functinality as well. There are also some neat free apps for it, such as this.

      The games have been mildly entertaining (definitely more so
  • I just got a Symbian OS based phone on Sunday. (Sony Ericsson T616) and had the idea to write a SSH client for it.

    A day late and a dollar short again :(
    • Re:Curses!! (Score:4, Interesting)

      by profet ( 263203 ) on Wednesday March 31, 2004 @01:31AM (#8722579)
      Um.... Sony Ericsson T616 isn't a Symbian OS based phone.

      And it is pretty much impossible to write an ssh client for it simply because of the crappy Sony Ericsson J2ME implementation. Sony Ericsson has chosen not to implement sockets so j2me "internet" apps must utilize wap push mechanisms in order to send/receive data.

      If you want a phone that supports sockets look for a phone with a phone that has MIDP 2.0 implemented. I'm pretty sure that sockets is a requirement in MIDP 2 and optional in MIDP 1.
      • Re:Curses!! (Score:3, Informative)

        by gl4ss ( 559668 )
        some j2me midp1.0 phones do support sockets(google search says that t616 doesn't though), in fact, almost all the recent one's. midp1.0 doesn't require it though. however, I'd be very skeptical of it being feasible to do a ssh client in one of them.

        the series60 putty has been out for months already.

        but yeah, people should not mix up feeble j2me apps and native symbian apps, the native one's have so much more power and access that j2me seems like a joke in comparision.

  • If Slashdot is posting stories about every Series 60 app released nearly a month ago, see you all in a moonth to discuss the new Helix client [helixcommunity.org].
    • An open source project backed by RealNetworks? That's just not natural!
    • I've had a version of putty on my P800 since I got the phone. It's a beta version (it was built 2003-01-31) but I've been using it with no problem for months.
      • And I can't remember when I installed it on my N-Gage, thought I know an event that happened just after when I used it, so I can look it up... Yeah, would have been early Jan. I think I installed it not long after the first version of the Ogg Vorbis player [geocities.com].
    • only if they'd made helix so that it would be possible to stream from the internet over bluetooth through pc's internet connection(actually they wouldn't need to do that much, just rip some parts off, like the one that insists on making a connection to an AP before trying to make the connection to the server as there's unofficial way to make it use the pc as gateway for just about any app, including wirelessirc and opera).

  • It's good (Score:5, Informative)

    by squiggleslash ( 241428 ) on Wednesday March 31, 2004 @12:38AM (#8722201) Homepage Journal
    I use PuTTY on my Nokia 9290 (and have done for a while.) It "just works".

    One thing to be aware of though is that it is limited to SSH - the PuTTY client for Windows does telnet and rlogin too, but not this version.

  • PuTTY Experience (Score:5, Informative)

    by fm6 ( 162816 ) on Wednesday March 31, 2004 @12:57AM (#8722346) Homepage Journal
    PuTTY for Windows is the best software of its kind. When I need an SSH/XTerm window to a Linux box, PuTTY is what I use, because I can't find an alternative that works nearly as well. That being said:
    • PuTTY insists that you use default XWindows conventions for cutting and pasting. Even most XWindows software is more flexible than that, never mind a cross-platform app. It's a pain for somebody who works primarily in Windows.
    • Configuration is horribly idiosyncratic. Options are not arranged in anything like a logical fashion, creating or modifying sessions is a pain, and it's too easy to make a bunch of changes and then lose them.
    Either the PuTTY people are totally bored by UI design issues, or they just like to torture people. I hate to complain, because it's basically good (even excellent) software, and the price is right. But come on, guys!
    • i agree to the UI issues... then again now it's very simple, and simple it should be. one thing i would like, transparent putty-window with a picture capability just like in most terms... sorry if this sounds stupid, but i would like that :) those, who don't want it, would just leave settings untouched.
      • Putty's authors advise you too use a 3rd party app for transparency (http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty /wishlist/transparency.html).

        Adding a bitmap will bloat the binary too much, according to them. But forks of putty which do this, exist. (only they are most of the time outdated).

        I am still waiting for the Tab support, nowadays my desktop at work is full of putty windows, what is a bit annoying. (Screen doesn't work good in Cygwin..).
        • Which kind of points up why PuTTY is such a solid program: the authors think in terms of simple practical functionality. I have nothing against non-functional eye candy, but programs that support things like transparency and theming tend to suffer, qualitywise.

          I guess you could argue that PuTTY's strength is also its weakness. The authors have very specific ideas about the architecture of the program, and don't leave a lot of room for tweaking.

          am still waiting for the Tab support, nowadays my desktop a

    • Re:PuTTY Experience (Score:4, Interesting)

      by TheVoice900 ( 467327 ) <kamil@kamilkisie ... inus threevowels> on Wednesday March 31, 2004 @04:08AM (#8723277)
      Also, portable configuration files in PuTTY would be a real blessing. One of the best parts of PuTTY is you can easily fit it on the tiny portable media of your choice and use it anywhere. Unfortunately it uses the registry to store its settings, sessions, etc and it would be nice if I didn't have to write to the registry of every machine I ever used it on. It would be nice to just carry a config file with all my sessions along with my PuTTY executable.
    • I am sure PuTTY people will accept your hight-quality patches addressing these deficiencies. Remember, everybody here scratches own itch!
      • I thought of that. But have you seen the PuTTY source? Fixing the configuration problem or making cut&paste more flexible would require more than a simple patch. It would be more like a major fork, or even a new app that borrowed a lot of PuTTY's routines. I probably don't have the skill to do that, and I certainly don't have the time. The best I can do is make whining noises and hope that somebody takes an interest.
    • PuTTY insists that you use default XWindows conventions for cutting and pasting.

      The problem is that they can't use ^C ^V like the rest of Windows apps because the program running inside putty may use those - for example if you are using pine. Therefore any method they choose will be akward when you are habituated to the windows shortcuts. The method they chose is at least familiar to some people and is much better than the DOS terminal's solution to this problem.

      Have you seen other programs that handle
      • The problem is that they can't use ^C ^V like the rest of Windows apps because the program running inside putty may use those - for example if you are using pine.

        That's nonsense. Text mode programs don't know about terminal cut and paste. They all think they're running on DEC-compatible terminals [vt100.net], which is what all XTerm implementations emulate. (Actually, they assume whatever terminal you specify via $TERM, but nowadays that's almost always set to "xterm", since hardware terminals are more or less dead.)

        • One of us is completely misunderstanding the other.

          Text mode programs don't know about terminal cut and paste. They all think they're running on DEC-compatible terminals, which is what all XTerm implementations emulate. (Actually, they assume whatever terminal you specify via $TERM, but nowadays that's almost always set to "xterm", since hardware terminals are more or less dead.)

          Agreed.

          They don't see mouse gestures. They just see input. They have no way of knowing whether these inputs come from a k
          • When you said "can't use ^V/^C" I took "can't" to mean "technically impossible." OK, not what you meant. But you're still wrong. Good terminal emulators always define some kind of quote sequence so you can pass through something you want interpreted by the remote system. Or you configure your keyboard shortcuts on the two systems so that they don't conflict. Or you don't use keyboard shortcuts at all -- I tend to rely on context menus for cutting and pasting. There's no "can't" here.
    • PuTTY does not, in fact insist that you use XWindows style cut and paste. I refer you to section 4.11.2 [earth.li] of the manual.
      • All that says is that you can change the specific action of the buttons. Which is in fact a standard XWindows feature. Or more precisely, a feature of most X window managers that were designed more than 10 years ago. Since then, more sophisticated input features have become commonplace. The right mouse button doesn't have a single function, it brings up a context-sensitive menu. Or you can skip the menu and use keyboard shortcuts. This kind of UI is something you see not just on Windows, but on most popular
    • No, you can configure Putty either for X-style cut and paste or Windows-style (like the command prompt window).

      It can't use C-c and C-v, and neither can Microsoft's own command prompt window, because those keystrokes might be used by the application.
      • And yet somehow other Xterm emulators manage to do this. Magic?
        • Of course it is possible for the terminal emulator to take C-c as copy and C-v as paste, but personally I would find it damn annoying because those keystrokes are often used by the application. The annoyance of having to use the mouse for cut and paste is smaller.

          This is a matter of personal preference, all I can say is that the Putty developers have the same preferences as the Windows command window developers and many other people.
    • I absolutely agree with you - PuTTY is a very nice SSH client. The only drawback I've encountered so far: it doesn't accept commands to be executed on the remote site via command line (yes, it does from within its UI), so I can not use it in a batch file to run a command on an SSH server and assign the result to an environment variable. To accomplish this, I still have to use the OpenSSH client from my Cygwin environment. Would be great to see that in a future version of PuTTY. :-)
  • I've had it on my 3650 since the end of December, according to this post describing how to use putty to ssh via Tmobile [jwiz.org].

    *promote*

  • So if I have an N-gage, I can SSH to with Putty? What will be the hardware interface? Or is there a mechanism to hook my N-gage to my computer and then SSH to it? - wouldn't that be kinda pointless then?

    wonder what I'm missing here... :-s
    • You need to connect your N-Gage to the internet via GPRS, dialup or whatever else it might offer. Then you'd SSH to your computer over the internet just like you would normally do from a remote location.

      I had putty on my 9290 about 8 months ago now, works great.

      It also runs on other Symbian phones like the Sony Ericsson P800 and P900.
  • Don't forget that putty also has built-in Nethack support! Does this version keep it so I can play from my phone?
  • No mention on the Sourceforge project page of a port to the older EPOC/Symbian OSes. Pity, I would have liked to have PuTTY running on my Psion 5mx.

    I currently use Hermes [demon.co.uk] and a direct serial connection to maintain my headless Linux boxes. Psion 5/5mx machines are really good for this with the 640x240 display and keyboard you can type on.

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