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Recruiters Use 'Digital Native' As Code For 'No Old Folks' 553

bizwriter writes: Companies are trying to get around Equal Employment Opportunity Commission restrictions on age-discriminatory language (like "recent college graduate") by saying that they want "digital natives." So far, no one has complained to the EEOC, but that could change. "Since the 1990s dotcom boom, many employers have openly sought to hire young, tech savvy talent, believing that was necessary to succeed in the new digital economy. At the same time, age discrimination complaints have spiraled upward, according to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, with 15,785 claims filed in 1997 compared to 20,588 filed in 2014.

Out of the 121 charges filed last year by the EEOC for alleged discriminatory advertising, 111 of them claimed the job postings discriminated against older applicants. The EEOC has said that using phrases like 'college student,' 'recent college graduate,' or 'young blood' violate the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1966. That federal law protects individuals who are 40 years of age or older from employment discrimination based on age."
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Recruiters Use 'Digital Native' As Code For 'No Old Folks'

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday May 04, 2015 @12:44PM (#49613629)

    What I find ironic is that the people who wrote the basic items that are taken for granted, be it the Linux kernel, apache, the HTTP protocol, the IP protocol, Mosaic and its derivatives... are all people likely over 40+.

    Demanding someone be a "digital native" means you will get someone who knows how to flip through cat pictures, re-list their stuff on WoW's Armory, talk about how bad their work environment is on Yik Yak while trying to hand out their kik ID for a score. You won't get someone who actually knows the foundation that those apps are built on.

    • by Austerity Empowers ( 669817 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:04PM (#49613873)

      I was born in the 70s and consider myself a "digital native". All computers I have used have been binary based, for example. All in fact based on transistors. I showed my son a picture of me at his age sitting in front of a TRS-80 and my much beloved Commodore 64 and you know what he said? He said "Wow Dad, you had computers!". Indeed, not only did I have them, but he recognized them as such.

      I guess my point is that I'm not sure the term "digital native" has any actual meaning, or at least such meaning will have to be proven in court. Was I turned down because I wasn't "digital native" enough? Or was I turned down because I was too old?

      • by Snotnose ( 212196 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:11PM (#49613957)
        "Digital Native" means you're obsessed with Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Opentable, selfies, etc.

        I was born in the 50's, bought a TRS-80 in '78 or so and have been programming ever since. Mostly device drivers, BSPs, etc.

        I know more about computers than most digital natives, yet it's hard for me to get a job because I'm old, don't use FB, don't twit, don't insta, don't have a phone full of selfies, etc.
        • by gman003 ( 1693318 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:26PM (#49614129)

          "Digital Native" means you're obsessed with Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Opentable, selfies, etc.

          Weird, I'm a 90's kid and:
          I haven't touched my Facebook account in years
          My Twitter is mostly subscriptions, generally to things that are actually interesting (eg. @RealTimeWWII not @kanye)
          I have no Instagram
          I've never actually heard of Opentable
          I've taken one selfie in my life, and it was a joke at my sister's wedding

          I also used MS-DOS (via Windows 95, sure, but it still counts), think Perl is a more useful language than Ruby or any other fad-language-of-the-week, and I can read assembler if given enough time and a table of opcodes.

          Do I still qualify as a Digital Native?

          • Do I still qualify as a Digital Native?

            Inherently, all humans are analog.... But we invented digital. The only true Digital Native would be an AI. Most of them are complete morons and can barely hold a conversation while staying on topic for more than 180 seconds. Even the best AI that I can think of is IBM's Watson, and so far, all he can do is answer trivia questions on Jeopardy.

          • So you are in your 30s now? Then you are too old. They want graduates who will work 50+ hour weeks for low pay. Around age 28 a little red light starts flashing on their hands and they are replaced before they start wanting s career or work-life balance.

            Actually you are kinda showing your age in your post. The kids abandoned facebook, there are too many old people on there. To be honest I've lost track myself... Do they still use Snapchat?

        • by Austerity Empowers ( 669817 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:30PM (#49614177)

          I know more about computers than most digital natives, yet it's hard for me to get a job because I'm old, don't use FB, don't twit, don't insta, don't have a phone full of selfies, etc.

          I understand your background, but honestly don't think you are qualified based solely on that. Application programming is a whole other world, with different tools, different practices and different objectives. I do not think I'd be qualified to apply to such a job right this instant.

          I certainly could learn, easily. I know how their stuff works, I was there before it all came around. But before I applied to the position I'd have to learn it all, and walk in ready to talk about it, and find a way to get some of the relevant technology on my resume. I don't think these guys will necessarily know what a BSP is, I wonder if they have considered hardware that is not a PC or mobile phone? I suspect they have not ever brought an OS up on custom hardware, nor do they plan it it. I think I'd read your resume and think you're well qualified to work at a hardware company, but I'm not sure I'd want you in a google or a facebook.

          Now it's an entry level job, no experience necessary, but you come in proving you what an AJAX is, and you can JQuery if you must but would rather (whatever the latest hotness is). You understand how to use Facebook and what API exists, and know what Twitter is useful for. You know their acronyms and their tools, If they turned you down then I'd cry discrimination, a true college fresh out with no industry experience really would be less qualified than you in that event, especially if you'll work for his wages.

        • > "Digital Native" means you're obsessed with Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Opentable, selfies, etc.

          Nice summary!

          FTFY, Digital Native, noun: A person who cares more about consuming content and other stupid vanity shit then actually learning how to _write_ apps in the first place.

          > yet it's hard for me to get a job because I'm old, don't use FB, don't twit, don't insta, don't have a phone full of selfies, etc.

          That's sad that companies value people who are more focused on _looking_ good, then actually _

      • by meta-monkey ( 321000 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:24PM (#49614103) Journal

        Yeah, motherfucker, I had the 80 column text card in my Apple IIe and a 1200 baud modem. I was dying of cholera and retrieving lost oxen before these kids were born.

      • He said "Wow Dad, you had computers!".

        Well duh! How else would were you going to let them know you wanted extra stegosaurus meat on your pizza delivery, or email your friends when you wanted to get together to play stickball? Seriously, kids nowadays.

    • by TWX ( 665546 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:05PM (#49613885)
      What I find funny about "Digital Native" only applying to young people is that there was at least one generation of computing professionals that had to make it work without any of this handholding technology that we have today. I remember my father having to get out the suitcase of a portable computer that work had assigned him, set it up on the dining room table, and dial-in to the mainframe to fix broken batch jobs on weekends occasionally. Since there was no access to the Internet and no vast array of resources on-hand, he had to actually know how to fix the problem without looking at forums or howtos or any other guides.

      "Digital Native" is great if you want someone that can do the job when at least some functionality remains, but if things are really broken and one can't reach the Internet, I don't see the Googlers of the world being able to prop the technology back up when it fails.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by ezakimak ( 160186 )

        Agreed--sounds to me as if "digital native" means someone that expects technology to "just work". We grew up surprised when things "just worked"--expecting to have to tinker (and indeed *enjoying* getting to tinker) to make machines do our bidding.

        • by TWX ( 665546 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:32PM (#49614215)
          I remember when I installed my first 3.5" floppy diskette drive in my 8088. It wouldn't read 1.44MB disks. It would try, it would start to format, but it would fail partially through a format or partially through an attempt to read an existing filesystem. I had to figure out why that was the case, and if I'm remembering right it took a trip to the library to read about the addressing limits of the 8088 processor. For an eleven year old, the best solution was to tape over the corner of the disk and reformat it to 720K. Not an ideal solution, but back then it was still common to get new software capable of running on an 8088 on 720K disks, so I didn't lose out as much as one might initially assume.

          I'm not expecting this exact piece of knowledge to be known by everyone, but given that the OS (DOS at the time) was really of no help to actually figuring out what the problem was, understanding how the technology works top-to-bottom is essential in being versatile in all situations. This particular problem was so abstract that not only was no dialogue box to use to figure it out, but there were no logs and only a few vague error messages. Even categorizing the nature of the error required learning how the processor worked, much lower level than most people are willing to go.
        • When I was a kid, the job I wanted when I grew up was to be the TV repairman. Everyone knew things did not "just work", so there were repair people. And they were NOT the same as the Apple "geniuses" or the Best Buy people trying to sell you stuff.

      • by sjames ( 1099 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @02:12PM (#49614613) Homepage Journal

        Surely, I must qualify as digital native in spite of being born in '66. I learned Fortran V ('77 wasn't out yet) on the school system's mainframe over a 300 baud modem. When I finally got a computer and modem of my own, I had to write a simple terminal program with Xmodem so I could download a real terminal program from a BBS.

        My wife informs me that she is 1/Commodore 64th digital on her father's side.

      • Who remembers figuring out Procomm Plus for the first time? Usenet? Trumpet Winsock?

  • by tepples ( 727027 ) <tepples.gmail@com> on Monday May 04, 2015 @12:46PM (#49613651) Homepage Journal

    If employers lose lawsuits over this, they'll probably change it to "up-to-date education" and "3 years of active use of a major social network, iOS or Android operating system, and electronic bill payment". This allows older people to technically qualify by having taken a relevant class at a local college and joining Facebook.

  • Nothign new here (Score:5, Insightful)

    by koan ( 80826 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @12:46PM (#49613653)

    Comcast online application has the question "Are you older than 49 or younger".
    When I went back to school to finish up, I applied for several low level IT jobs and was asked "aren't you a little old for this job?".
    Watch the look on the temp service persons face when they meet you the first time,ageism is fairly rampant I would say.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday May 04, 2015 @12:48PM (#49613663)
    "Digital native" is old and only luddites use that term. The new term is app appers, because app appers love apping apps!

    Apps!
  • Tech Savvy (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Archangel Michael ( 180766 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @12:49PM (#49613679) Journal

    Fad Savvy more likely. Most of the "Tech Savvy" people I know are Google experts, meaning they know how to Google for an answer, and they think that makes them an expert. Take away their computer, and they can't have a Tech conversation with anyone.

    They have no idea what it takes to get them their "Google". They aren't tech savvy, they are digital savvy illiterates.

    • Re:Tech Savvy (Score:5, Interesting)

      by war4peace ( 1628283 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:28PM (#49614149)

      Disclaimer: I'm nearing 40.
      I don't think you're right. Using Google taught me a lot of things I otherwise wouldn't have known. Gone are the days when you could master an IT area without looking up documentation on a daily basis. Before, you had brick-width books which weighted up to 10+ pounds. Now, you have Google AND some books. There is no "better" between the two. I use both.

      Self-taught is self-taught, be it through books or online lookup. Memory could only take you so far, and many strains of formal education throughout the world are still following the classic way (learn it by heart or else!) which, let's be honest, is becoming obsolete. But I digress.

      Companies are looking to hire young people because:
      - they take most shit and are happy eating it. I was there, I've done that.
      - they likely don't have a family (so they're more likely to use their free time working)
      - they're eager to please (I call it "dog loyalty"). It's not an offensive term, it's just younger people are yet to be screwed over and so they're fully loyal even to a vicious master.
      - they're cheaper because employers play on their "lack of experience".
      And many other reasons which I'm too lazy to enumerate, most of them being unrelated to technical skills.

    • by Tablizer ( 95088 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:28PM (#49614157) Journal

      Their bullshit may be more modern. Perhaps us ol' fogies should attend "Bullshit like a young buck" courses.

      When you are interviewing with a PHB, talking the talk matters. Let's face it, the work world is largely a bullshitting game, for good or bad. It would be nice if it were about logic and planning, but humans got into the mix and mucked up that ideal.

      I remember during one interview the PHB asked me if I liked to download stuff to my PC to experiment with new gizmos. I replied that I did, but that I prefer to have one "production" PC to get regular work done and a separate "experimental" PC that can be rebaselined if the experiments mess it up and/or to not cross-mix experiments. (Active-X was the "big thing" at the time, which should be enough to explain my caution.)

      Anybody with experience will agree this is the rational way to do it. However, this was a start-up and they had no money for double PC's. (Maybe I should have offered to buy my own spare.) My "kind" wasn't welcome. The details of reality bothered them: they wanted to be sold cheap pie in the sky. That is, naive pioneers who don't know about the arrows yet.

      That's not me. I value my experience and all the caveats I've learned over the years. I don't intend to sound grumpy or a like parade-rainer, but rather I'm just giving potential risks and estimated probabilities in a direct factual way. If you want to plow thru the asteroid field without being told the odds, then hang out with Jedi's fresh off the dust-farm and contraband runners. And off my swamp, get!

  • by mmell ( 832646 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @12:49PM (#49613681)
    We call then n00bs. :^)
  • EEO bullshit (Score:5, Insightful)

    by rodrigoandrade ( 713371 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @12:50PM (#49613691)
    This is one of the biggest bullshit laws I've ever seen.

    Let's say I don't want to hire you because you're old. EEO laws simply mean that I can't say it in your face that you're old. Instead, i send you the standard HR rejection e-mail and we're all good.

    Sight, I hate seeing my tax $$ going to waste drafting these stupid laws.
    • Would it be a bad idea to follow up a rejection letter with "Is there anything I could do to improve my skills to make myself a better fit for your company?"

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward
      You sure as fuck aren't a boss I'd ever want to have, you fucking Ayn Randtard.
    • Re:EEO bullshit (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Kjella ( 173770 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:40PM (#49614305) Homepage

      2015:

      This is one of the biggest bullshit laws I've ever seen. Let's say I don't want to hire you because you're old. EEO laws simply mean that I can't say it in your face that you're old. Instead, i send you the standard HR rejection e-mail and we're all good. Sight, I hate seeing my tax $$ going to waste drafting these stupid laws.

      1965:

      This is one of the biggest bullshit laws I've ever seen. Let's say I don't want to hire you because you're [black]. EEO laws simply mean that I can't say it in your face that you're [black]. Instead, i send you the standard HR rejection e-mail and we're all good. Sight, I hate seeing my tax $$ going to waste drafting these stupid laws.

      You're right, certain bits hasn't changed much...

  • by hey! ( 33014 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @12:52PM (#49613719) Homepage Journal

    How much more "native" could I be?

  • Pay, not talent (Score:5, Insightful)

    by StikyPad ( 445176 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @12:52PM (#49613721) Homepage

    Companies want recent college grads because they know they're willing to work for less, not because they believe them to be more talented. Do you want to pay a landscaper $100 to mow your lawn, or the kid across the street $20? Same concept. If it's important, you'll pay the experienced professional, but a lot of development work is doable by amateurs. It might not look as good, but it's good enough.

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Bull.

      Companies do not have problems with people unwilling to work for their salary because of AGE. They have problems with people unwilling to work for their salaries because other people are paying more for the same work.

      Lots of older people are willing to work for the same salary as younger people.

      What's going on is instead a desire to have a young person:

      1) Not ask for things like overtime that they are legally entitled to.

      2) Not get sick

      3) Stay there forever.

      Older people are less likely to do those th

    • Re:Pay, not talent (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Dragonslicer ( 991472 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:12PM (#49613965)

      Companies want recent college grads because they know they're willing to work for less, not because they believe them to be more talented.

      I think it's more than just accepting lower salary, but also accepting more abuse. A 23-year-old is less likely to have other major commitments (in particular, a family). It's a lot more difficult to force someone to work 60+ hours per week when they have to be home to help take care of the kids.

    • Re:Pay, not talent (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Lumpy ( 12016 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:28PM (#49614145) Homepage

      Right here is the solid fact.

      it's not about skill, It's about how cheap can we get the whores for, and how hard can we abuse them.

      20 somethings tend to be too stupid to stand up for themselves and accept a 60 hour workweek as normal. They also buy the bullshit of "what doesn't kill you makes you stronger" and keep accepting more and more workload.

  • I'm an old guy... (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Needs2BeSaid ( 4062029 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @12:53PM (#49613725) Homepage
    It's hard finding programming jobs with so many younger developers willing to work 70+ hours per week at 2/3 the salary I'm used to making.

    That being said, let companies hire who they want. I don't really understand the forced-melting-pot concept of hiring. If a company wants young people, who am I to force them to take me?
    • I don't really understand the forced-melting-pot concept of hiring. If a company wants young people, who am I to force them to take me?

      Anti-discrimination laws keep older people from becoming long-term unemployed before they are old enough to qualify for social security. Long-term unemployment is associated with increased costs to the government to control crime.

  • Pull the other one (Score:5, Insightful)

    by paiute ( 550198 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @12:53PM (#49613729)
    "That federal law protects individuals who are 40 years of age or older from employment discrimination based on age."

    HR drones everywhere are rolling on the carpet laughing. Ever tried to get HR to pass your resume along if they spot any clue that you are 50+?
    • by luis_a_espinal ( 1810296 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:14PM (#49613989) Homepage

      "That federal law protects individuals who are 40 years of age or older from employment discrimination based on age." HR drones everywhere are rolling on the carpet laughing. Ever tried to get HR to pass your resume along if they spot any clue that you are 50+?

      As we get older, That we should accrue several skills that are hard to commoditize (sp?), such as:

      1. veritable expertise in a domain (several domains preferably to act as fall-back plan A, plan B, plan C, etc.),
      2. a reliable professional network,
      3. a portfolio of work (something, anything),
      4. increased business acumen,
      5. leadership skills,
      6. cross-domain troubleshooting abilities (software/hardware/network troubleshooting),
      7. and an ability to do lateral moves, however painful they might be, to put food on the table without significantly sacrificing our current lifestyles.

      All of that crap translates to the following: By the time we hit 40's we shouldn't not be directly competing for the same type of jobs with right-out-of-school kids. Or in more general terms, we should allow ourselves to fall into a situation of having to compete with people 15-20 years our junior.

      If we are, then we didn't pay attention to our career development. I saw this in earnest because I spent (wasted) a good chunk of my mid-career years being happy as a "code warrior", disdainfully avoiding any opportunities to take greater responsibilities or broadening my professional and technical horizons. I wasn't being lazy as I would happily clock 60/70 hours "just coding". I was just being ignorant (and ignorance is bliss, right?)

      It wasn't until I had people depending on me that I realize how stupid and dangerous that is. We do not get any younger, and we must have something to show from all those years of experience (show something other than coding abilities.)

      I oppose age discrimination on principle (and any kind of discrimination unrelated to reasonable work requirements - working more for less is not a reasonable working requirement.)

      But I see too many people resting on their laurels expecting to retire doing the same shit they have been doing for the last 20-30 years. That *dream* started to get shattered when the Japanese started beating the crap of American manufacturing 30-40 years ago.

      Some people really hadn't gotten the memo yet.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday May 04, 2015 @12:55PM (#49613739)

    I've been called "culturally incompatible", which I know means "too old."

    Yes, posting as AC, because my lawyers told me to.

    It's been said before, the over-30s with a family don't care about the in-office perks, they just want to go home and spend time with their kids.

    These companies are missing the flip side of the coin, that the over-50s are highly motivated (saving for retirement!,) often highly skilled, and generally have done that before, several times. Though they do command the big salaries.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      And we get the job done where those young whippersnappers just give up and throw their toys out of the pram.
      My current boss has been trying to hire my replacement (so I can retire) for almost two years.
      So far no takers. There are people who are competent in a couple of the technologies we use but ask them something in the interview that is outside their core? They really have no clue and a good few don't seem to want to learn.
      I blame the Universities. They just don't seem to teach hoe to view a system from

      • Sounds like your company might be better served instead of spending the last 2 years trying to find an exact fit, hiring someone who was close and could learn and then train them. Granted this would have required the company invest money in the employee and once fully trained offer incentives to actually retain them so they don't jump ship at the next available opportunity. Doing so does require some longer term thinking and most managers and executives can't think much farther ahead than the next bonus per
  • The hypocrisy... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Etherwalk ( 681268 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @12:57PM (#49613781)

    "That federal law protects individuals who are 40 years of age or older from employment discrimination based on age."

    I don't think I ever realized how ironic that was before now. A threshold requirement for an age discrimination claim is that you not be certain ages...

    • Not hypocrisy. The law also protects against youth discrimination, but because that is so much rarer, the law goes into much greater detail on what constitutes discrimination against elders. Basically, the law bans all age discrimination in employment -- judge on merit and ability, not on age -- but spells out in detail all the questions you cannot ask during an interview in an effort to try to ferret out someone's age.

  • Native? As in the ones who were here first or showed up later? The older folks who actually created the systems and infrastructure everyone uses and now takes for granted, or the youngsters who just use those systems and infrastructure, but have little/no idea how anything actually works? I'm not sure who to thank most, the people who created Ethernet or Angry Birds.

  • by ErichTheRed ( 39327 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:06PM (#49613893)

    I am just about to hit that milestone 40th birthday this year. If things are as bad as they seem, I'm probably in for a rough couple of decades.

    One thing that does bother me is that "digital natives" are no more or less capable of doing a good job in a technology job than older people. The skills are the same -- creative problem solving, troubleshooting, logical thinking and awesome communications skills. Older people do have different qualities in my opinion:
    - We've been around the block and seen technology fads appear, disappear and come back later on with better underpinnings. We've also seen how stuff like virtualization and application containers aren't actually new concepts...just way better now than they were.
    - Many/most of us have obligations outside of work and greater responsibilities. A 40 year old with two little kids [raises hand] has a little less flexibility than a recent grad who will move anywhere in the country in a week, doesn't mind sharing a 2-bedroom apartment with roommates and will willingly work 14-hour days for no extra pay.
    - Many/most of us have also figured out the game of working for a company, and prefer a healthier work/life balance to throwing all your energy into projects that can sometimes get trashed for no reason.
    - One advantage we do have is growing up with computers in a much more primitive state, where more about the actual machine was exposed to you. "Digital natives" grow up with packaged platforms and a lot of the underpinnings are permanently abstracted away unless you are sufficiently motivated to dig further.

    For these reasons, among others, companies prefer younger workers because they're easier to control. I'm not saying that all of us oldsters are perfect -- I've worked with a lot of burnt out folks who do the bare minimum to keep their job. But, in my opinion it's not fair to paint everyone with the same brush. I won't kill myself for deadlines the way a 22-year-old working for EA might, but I have cranked out consistent good work over my career, and really want to continue doing so until I don't feel I can contribute anymore.

  • My Grandpa would count. He's been dead since 2002 and he was in his 90ies. Given, he worked with Grumman Aircraft on the Lunar Lander back in the 60ies as an electronics engineer (hearing the proud grandson? ;-) ). Basically high-end avantgrade technology back then, but he was a digital native none-the-less.

    So is just about any computer kid of the eighties approaching 50 years of age today. We grew along in lock-step with the hardware, its capabilites and our capabilites to understand it. I'd argue that nobody will be more digitally native than our generation of nerds.

    I'd also argue that I am way more a digital native than my daughter, since I not only can operate a computer or smartphone, but actually know how it works.

    In short, I can't see how this is supposed to be an age-filter. Perhaps a fiter for non-tech-savy, ok. The age-filters I've come across are more like "willing to travel" (go forth and act as a fall-guy for that remote project heading towards a solid brick wall), "resilient" (german: "belastbar") ... meaning "young and stupid enough to work extra hours under shitty gouvernance for no extra pay and a fake career outlook" ... and similar telling lines in the confidentials.

    On top of that, how hilarious is an HR person asking for "digital natives"? We all know the bizar truth behind this.
    Most of those people couldn't distinguish Google from the Web in general if their life depended on it. It's idiots like these who know less than nothing and actually think they can judge tech and its requirements. Admitted, quite a few if not most of those actually *are* above 40, but they shouldn't get to call out for digital natives. They'd mistake a resus monkey for one.

  • by pavon ( 30274 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:12PM (#49613967)

    At the same time, age discrimination complaints have spiraled upward, according to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, with 15,785 claims filed in 1997 compared to 20,588 filed in 2014.

    In 17 years the number of complaints went up by 30%. However according to the Census Bureau, the number of "Mathematical and Computer Science" workers increased by 150% between 1997 and 2012 (from 1.3 Million to 3.3 Million). The number of job postings likely scaled similarly, so the complaints per posting actually went down.

    Source:
    http://www.census.gov/prod/3/9... [census.gov]
    http://www.census.gov/compendi... [census.gov]

  • by lophophore ( 4087 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:21PM (#49614061) Homepage

    I'm a digital native.

    I learned to program on a DEC-20, PDP-8, PDP-11, and later worked on VAX-11 and Alpha, for Digital. How much more Digital (tm) do you want?

    • by OhPlz ( 168413 )

      I had a similar thought reading the headline. I'm at work in an old DEC facility. All the old farts here are "natives" in that they worked here for DEC and whatever companies happened to call this home ever since.

      I guess "digital native" is the positive version of "gen cupcake".

  • by gatkinso ( 15975 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:25PM (#49614111)

    that natives were there first. But this seems lost on young recruiters.

  • It's about money (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Tyr07 ( 2300912 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:25PM (#49614115) Homepage

    The reason they want only younger applicants is to save time on people who know what their job is worth.

    If they can sucker a younger inexperienced person in, they can tack on a shit ton of shitty and bull job responsibilities for crap pay.
    An older person knows what it's worth, will tell them no or demand more pay for the amount of work they want.

    Simply put they're just trying to save time, they don't want to interview those folks.
    They should be forced to change their job postings to say :"Looking for young technologically capable but generally dumb otherwise to accept job with ridiciously low pay, crappy hours and way to much work"

  • by morgauxo ( 974071 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @01:47PM (#49614371)

    Most of the time when those tech companies are targeting the young people it's naiveté that they are really looking for.

    They want someone who will work all their waking hours on salary and not bitch about it because they think they are "a part of something". They think they are working on the next Facebook and they are going to get rich because they are among the early employees.

    In actuality they are just looking to pump as much cheap labor as they possibly can until either the kids are all burnt out and they dump them for fresh ones or they can find someone to sell the company to, likely laying everyone off but getting the owner a nice check out of the deal.

    Most older people should know better by now anyway and realize they aren't missing much.

  • by walterbyrd ( 182728 ) on Monday May 04, 2015 @02:25PM (#49614751)

    I have worked in IT since 1979.

    Where do people get this idea that IT workers work with old technologies? The idea is not true, and makes no sense.

    Do older car mechanics only know how to work on older cars? How about older doctors, lawyers, scientists?

    Do you think an installation has new technologies for younger workers, and older technologies for older workers?

    I work with latest released technologies all the time.

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