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Programming Microsoft Open Source

Microsoft Open-Sources Visual Studio Code (visualstudio.com) 160

An anonymous reader writes: Microsoft today unleashed a torrent of news at its Connect(); 2015 developer event in New York City. The company open-sourced code editing software Visual Studio Code, launched a free Visual Studio Dev Essentials program, pushed out .NET Core 5 and ASP.NET 5 release candidates, unveiled Visual Studio cloud subscriptions, debuted the Visual Studio Marketplace, and a lot more. The source for Visual Studio Code is available at GitHub under the MIT license. They've also released an extension (preview) for Visual Studio that facilitates code debugging on Linux.
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Microsoft Open-Sources Visual Studio Code

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  • by jlp2097 ( 223651 ) on Wednesday November 18, 2015 @01:03PM (#50955811) Homepage Journal

    Just to avoid any confusion: VS Code is not Visual Studio, VS Code is a web-based code editor.

    • by sosume ( 680416 ) on Wednesday November 18, 2015 @01:17PM (#50955907) Journal

      VS Code is not a web-based, but a filesystem or git based code editor and debugger with support for .net, node.js and other language stacks. Somewhere between Sublime Text and Sharpdevelop.

      • by idontgno ( 624372 ) on Wednesday November 18, 2015 @02:09PM (#50956421) Journal

        I suspect the confusion arises because TFA (last link in TFS) [arstechnica.com] says that

        The free and cross-platform Chromium-based code editor Visual Studio Code is being open sourced today.

        (Emphasis added)

        "Chromium-based" means it's based on a web browser engine, but that doesn't make it web-based. Its backside could easily be file- or Git-based, as you say.

        Very interesting, and maybe confusing, move by Microsoft.

        • It's based on Electron, the core of Atom.

          My preference in the editors-made-of-browser-tech space is still Komodo Edit, but I like the liveliness that Atom has.

      • by gnupun ( 752725 )

        But does it support developing desktop apps? Their website suggests it's only for web development:

        "Build and debug modern web and cloud applications."

        • For desktop apps you are better off with Visual Studio Community Edition (previously known as Visual Studio Professional). The community edition is not, like the older Express editions, a paired-down version of VS, this is the full Professional edition.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      So... more news not really worth talking about.
      • It would have been exciting is Microsoft Visual C was open sourced, and we can once and for all end the tyranny of that wretched piece of shit and bring it in line with other build tools used everywhere else. I am tired of all the hoops I have to jump through to make code that compiles on linux (clang and gcc), os x (clang) and cygwin (gcc) compile under msvc, and I'm not even talking about the lack of posix support. That would make me hate microsoft a little less.

        But no this is some silly editor I never he

        • by bondsbw ( 888959 )

          Eyeliner is a solution to a problem I don't have. But I don't go on makeup forums and suggest that Avon should stop making eyeliner.

      • It's always news when M$ opensources something.

  • by xxxJonBoyxxx ( 565205 ) on Wednesday November 18, 2015 @01:03PM (#50955813)

    >> Connect();

    Could we please quit with the stupid punctuation in conference names? It just messes with search engines, folder structures, etc. Just call this "VScon" and everyone will get the message that this is for Microsoft developers using Visual Studio.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Or perhaps fix the search engines? When the search engines defines how we use the language, something is wrong.

    • by bmajik ( 96670 )

      Give us some credit for taking baby steps...

      A few years ago, this would have been called "Microsoft Active Developer Conference 2016 with Bing.com and VisualStudio.com"

      Surely you agree that "Connect();" is an improvement ?

      • by Anonymous Coward

        A few years ago, this would have been called "Microsoft Active Developer Conference 2016 with Bing.com and VisualStudio.com"

        Surely you agree that "Connect();" is an improvement ?

        From a descriptive-yet-long name to a non-descriptive, non-googleable name? Not really an improvement.

      • Nah, because it involves punctuation. Look, it's not hard, the way to create a post-desktop modern tech web 10.0 name is to put 'r' or 'ly' on the end of a word, like:

        connectly, voidly, mallocly
        readr, pointr, newr

        That way it'll Google, it'll be kinda unique, and it'll still look just as embarassing and hip in a "Yo young kids, I may be your granddad but I'm hip with your Rick Astleys and Madonna music and Beavis and or Butthead" way as your attempts to include punctuation.

      • They try to be trendy and it backfires. I really hate when they call my full feature laptop, notebook a "device" on Windows 10 too.

        They should look to IBM, they just reinvented themselves without doing such "lets look cool to these young kids" trickery. They stayed as Big Blue. For example, having complete W3C HTML valid homepage (don't know current) is way more modern than coming up with some pseudo code names.

      • Actually, I'm giving MS a heck of a lot of credit these days. It's a different Microsoft from what we here at slashdot are used to.

        VS Code is brilliant. MS's actions embracing open source are wonderful. Azure supporting Linux is awesome. Windows 10 is a freaking amazing OS and for the first time in a long time the best consumer OS on the market (though I'm still partial to Linux on servers).

        Microsoft has embraced JavaScript and NodeJS, and they are actively pushing the open web and standards. Edge browser h

    • Just call this "VScon" and everyone will get the message that this is for Microsoft developers using Visual Studio.

      Especially the 'con' part.

    • People will remember the one and only Windows 98 C:/con/con Bug , not good for new Microsoft ;-)

      https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=... [youtube.com]

    • Conversely:

      Can we please fix search engines and file systems to work with punctuation. Altering our behavior to comply with the limitations of the tech de jour is not and end state solution.

  • Why? why now? (Score:1, Insightful)

    by nimbius ( 983462 )
    If you're a developer working in a shop writing code for bethesda or valve or EA, chances are your windows site license for desktops and servers is already heavily discounted thanks to your generous interest in a visual studio license despite eclipse being right there. Chances are even better that in order to keep this generous discount your manager has started shoehorning C# into your project requirements to 'maximize the investment value' of what basically amounts to a protection racket for good customer
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by Anonymous Coward
      Not one statement in the above rant is true or apropos the actual fucking subject.
    • Ah Eclipse, the IDE so terrible and slow that Google stopped using it and released Android Studio.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Say what you want about MS business tactics, but Visual Studio is the best code editor currently available.

      And despite the growth of smart phones and tablets, the desktop application market is still a huge market. Not everyone wants to make app store crap.

      because they exclusively refused to participate in microsofts cash cow scheme.

      Who gives a fuck? The released it under the MIT license. Fork it and do whatever you want with it now.

      • > but Visual Studio is the best code editor currently available.

        Define "best" ... ? ... for "what" exactly ?

        Because while VS is fine for Windows debugging its text editor has sucked for years. Windows only, closed source, slow, etc. I'd rather use Vim or Emacs which works across multiple platforms (I use the same .vimrc config file across Windows, OSX, and Linux), is fast, has tons of features and plugins, and isn't interested in putting the menu in ALL CAPS because some retard UI designer doesn't have

    • Ironically I was reading this article yesterday which goes into more detail how Microsoft lost momentum to web clients:

      How Microsoft Lost the API War [decider.com]

    • by SirSlud ( 67381 )

      If you're a developer working in a shop writing code for bethesda or valve or EA, chances are your windows site license for desktops and servers is already heavily discounted thanks to your generous interest in a visual studio license despite eclipse being right there. Chances are even better that in order to keep this generous discount your manager has started shoehorning C# into your project requirements to 'maximize the investment value' of what basically amounts to a protection racket for good customers

    • Actually, I'll probably be switching my whole team over to this once they add two things, 1) vim keybindings and 2) support for debugging node clusters

      Why? Because it's lightweight, runs everywhere, is open source and works great. It supports node debugging well. It's a heck of a lot better than Webstorm, which we're currently using. Webstorm is nice but so full of feature bloat that all I see all day as I code is the little mac spinning rainbow as java slowly executes.

      There are plenty of other editors out

    • despite eclipse being right there

      Having a root canal in all my teeth with no sedation would be FAR more comfortable than switching back to using Eclipse as my main development environment. Seriously. Visual Studio is that much better. The reality is that VS is what Eclipse could have been if Eclipse developers knew anything about usability. C# is what Java could have been if it wasn't (both now and before) managed by a moronic committee. The fact that I can now deploy on Linux is a huge plus, but I would not give up Visual Studio as my dev

  • by PsychoSlashDot ( 207849 ) on Wednesday November 18, 2015 @01:31PM (#50956037)
    Now we can have/need the .NET 3, 4, 4.5 and 5 runtimes all on the same machine, meaning monthly patches will take another half-hour.

    I get it. .NET runtimes recompile and optimize for the environment they're installed on and that's a Good Thing, but as someone who supports a lot of small & medium business who can't justify WSUS or similar, .NET is - by far - the thing I dread seeing not yet applied to a customer's machine. One new runtime a decade would be just fine by me.

    Yes, there's supposed to be a certain degree of backwards-compatibility, but in practice that degree is "not enough that installing Product X doesn't frequently force you to install runtime Y".
    • by bmajik ( 96670 )

      I'd be interested in learning more about the compatibility problems you're having with real apps and .net framework versions.

      We know that there are ocassionally compat issues because we have large customers we work with to try and mitigate them.

      There are already mechanisms built into .net for rebinding apps to use specific framework and assembly versions, e.g. the .exe.config file that you can modify without access to the application's source code.

      In general, .NET 2.0 and .NET 4.0 are the two separate runti

      • I'd be interested in learning more about the compatibility problems you're having with real apps and .net framework versions.

        We know that there are ocassionally compat issues because we have large customers we work with to try and mitigate them.

        Typically it's an issue with installers, not necessarily products themselves. When installing various utilities, especially products that haven't been - or needed to be - updated in a while, I've encountered installers that simply won't proceed until a legacy .NET framework is installed. They're not checking for higher versions, they're not checking for equivalent versions, they're checking for precisely the version they were written for. Sometimes you can ignore that and proceed. Sometimes you can't.

    • You just provided an answer to people whining about "Why business people, enterprise insist on relying to MS solutions (.NET etc) rather than Linux/OSX?"

      Business wants long term support and dependability. When couple of nerds in a IRC channel or Starbucks decide the fate of their multi million dollar applications future because "nobody uses it", it doesn't work.

      Windows 10 can still run software coded in 1995.

  • by postmortem ( 906676 ) on Wednesday November 18, 2015 @01:41PM (#50956117) Journal

    They use tabs instead of spaces!

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Ah, eclipse, with the [garbage collection] power of [garbage collection] java which [garbage collection] [garbage collection] [garbage collection] enables rich [garbage collection] code [garbage collection] [garbage collection] editing and tight integration with [garbage collection] [garbage collection] [garbage collection] java frame [garbage collection]works.

    And to run it comfortably, you only need 16gb of ram, and a very fast ssd that it can [garbage collection] [garbage collection] [garbage co

    • by kervin ( 64171 )

      First, you do realize .Net is also garbage collected right? Secondly Elipse and Netbeans [netbeans.org] are excellent and mature IDEs that support dozens of languages and platforms.

      The whole 'Java is slow' meme is at least a 15 years passe, try something new.

      • by mark-t ( 151149 )
        Thirdly, what serious developer is still using fewer than 16gigabytes of RAM as we approach the end of 2015? (insert tongue-in-cheek emoji here).
  • by chmod a+x mojo ( 965286 ) on Wednesday November 18, 2015 @02:01PM (#50956327)

    You can now contribute to VS Code:
    Submit bugs and help us verify fixes as they are checked in.
    Review the source code changes.
    Contribute bug fixes through pull requests.
    Update and add to the documentation.

    Anyways, joking aside, it's cool that stuff is being released in a more open way than it was traditionally with Microsoft. Hopefully they will keep up the trend and not revert to their old ways.

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