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1.5 Million Verizon Customer Records Put Up For Sale (arstechnica.com) 26

An anonymous reader writes: A customer database as well as information about Verizon security flaws were reportedly put up for sale by criminals this week after a data breach at Verizon Enterprise Solutions. According to KrebsOnSecurity, "a prominent member of a closely guarded underground cybercrime forum posted a new thread advertising the sale of a database containing the contact information on some 1.5 million customers of Verizon Enterprise." The entire database was priced at $100,000, or $10,000 for each set of 100,000 customer records. "Buyers also were offered the option to purchase information about security vulnerabilities in Verizon's Web site," security journalist Brian Krebs reported. Verizon has apparently fixed the security flaws and has reassured its customers by saying "our investigation to date found an attacker obtained basic contact information on a number of our enterprise customers" and that "no customer proprietary network information (CPNI) or other data was accessed or accessible."
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1.5 Million Verizon Customer Records Put Up For Sale

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  • Is it time for companies to keep most customer records "near-line" instead of "online"?

    Yes, this may mean having the company put you on hold for a minute or two while your record gets moved from "near line" to "online" when you call for help, but at least "massive" data breaches will be "less massive."

    Question: What's another major advantage of keeping records "near-line" besides fewer victims?
    Answer: You can keep track of how many records are being moved in any given period of time and quickly respond if t

  • I have to wonder if the value and mostly anonymous nature of Bitcoins are enabling these kinds of deals. I'm not saying Bitcoin is necessarily evil, but do I have to wonder to myself, would these kinds of ransoms and/or sales of stolen data be as easily possible without Bitcoin?

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Surely no ransoms ever happened in the days before Bitcoin!

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