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Programming Microsoft

JavaScript Rules But Microsoft Programming Languages Are On the Rise (zdnet.com) 141

Microsoft languages seem to be hitting the right note with coders across ops, data science, and app development. From a report: JavaScript remains the most popular programming language, but two offerings from Microsoft are steadily gaining, according to developer-focused analyst firm RedMonk's first quarter 2018 ranking. RedMonk's rankings are based on pull requests in GitHub, as well as an approximate count of how many times a language is tagged on developer knowledge-sharing site Stack Overflow. Based on these figures, RedMonk analyst Stephen O'Grady reckons JavaScript is the most popular language today as it was last year. In fact, nothing has changed in RedMonk's top 10 list with the exception of Apple's Swift rising to join its predecessor, Objective C, in 10th place. The top 10 programming languages in descending order are JavaScript, Java, Python, C#, C++, CSS, Ruby, and C, with Swift and Objective-C in tenth.

TIOBE's top programming language index for March consists of many of the same top 10 languages though in a different order, with Java in top spot, followed by C, C++, Python, C#, Visual Basic .NET, PHP, JavaScript, Ruby, and SQL. These and other popularity rankings are meant to help developers see which skills they should be developing. Outside the RedMonk top 10, O'Grady highlights a few notable changes, including an apparent flattening-out in the rapid ascent of Google's back-end system language, Go.

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JavaScript Rules But Microsoft Programming Languages Are On the Rise

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    What about typescript? It's javascript, it's microsoft, #overload

  • "JavaScript Rules". Who submitted this, Beavis & Butthead?

    Heh heh. Ada sucks. Huh huh.

    • Heh heh. Ada sucks. Huh huh.

      A gentleman doesn't kiss and tell.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 12, 2018 @03:40PM (#56248429)
    So the most fucked up and confusing languages will generate the most questions and get labeled as the most popular?
    • by DavidHumus ( 725117 ) on Monday March 12, 2018 @03:44PM (#56248455)
      Or the language with the most newbies.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      It's the only way Microsoft languages can show higher on a list. And they they pay someone to write about the list so it sounds new and informative even when the list is the same as it was the year before and possibly the year before that. Usually adding wording about Microsoft x, y or z picking up share get sprinkled around too.

      Marketing, marketing marketing or was that Developers, developers, developers during a marketing conference.
         

    • Oh, for mod points...^^^^
    • Beat me to it.

      How about a study ranking the languages that seem to be the most reliable -- as in they've been used for decades, continue to be used, run systems un-upgraded for decades, and need little-to-no new help from random strangers?

      In my career, I've been using Perl since 1997, when I abandoned lotus notes. I've still got production code from back then -- it's funny to see some of my really old comments from half-a-life ago.

      I'll say this for perl: like it or hate it, the documentation is everywhere

  • BS (Score:5, Interesting)

    by xxxJonBoyxxx ( 565205 ) on Monday March 12, 2018 @03:44PM (#56248457)
    As a guy who has spent most of his time in Microsoft dev environments, I can tell you the momentum is going in exactly the opposite direction: "how can we dump Microsoft/Oracle/IBM and how fast can we do it" is the current direction of the smart enterprise.
    • by Anonymous Coward

      Thank god,

      I hate Oracle and Microsoft products. Oracle is expensive af and doesn't offer much that other databases can't offer. Don't even get me started on that POS APEX

      Is it just me or is it hard to find negative opinions or well written reviews of why Oracle products are bad? Does Oracle send out the gestapo when someone has a dissenting opinion of them that isn't a random comment?

    • Unfortunately, Visual Studio is still something that colleges and universities rely upon when teaching students.

      That means that VC++, C#, .NET are the tools students are entering the job market with.

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Junta ( 36770 )

        I recall back in college, a professor said 'ok, we aren't going to use this, but I'm required to give each of you a copy of visual studio, so here you go'.

        This is a huge reason to be wary of the various 'corporation wants to "help" teach computing' situation. All those free/extreme discount student licenses? Well the first hit is free.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by dwpro ( 520418 )
          I recall back in college, we developed on sun ultrasparks using feature poor text editors, and spent much time pouring over code for simple typos and parsing core dumps. Now as a professional developer I wouldn't hesitate for a moment to purchase a visual studios license if it weren't provided by work. Much of enterprise software is useless and overpriced-but not visual studios, IMHO.
          • and spent much time pouring over code

            Isn't that rather messy?

            • by dwpro ( 520418 )
              Quite, as one might expect from a bunch of nerds crowded in poorly ventilated computer lab. Thank you for keeping the pedant spirit of Slashdot alive Hognoxious. *fedora tip*
          • by Junta ( 36770 )

            To be honest, that's not a terrible strategy to begin programming. Get a feel and understanding up front for some of the fundamentals before letting an IDE do it for you. I've run into too many folks that can't make a simple C program and compile it, without making it a project.

            As it moves up, there are a variety of IDEs in the world, and it would be wise to have curriculum ensure exposure to them in diverse ways. A curriculum that produces good well rounded professionals should have the users adept at u

      • by Anonymous Coward

        Visual Studio is my favorite IDE. I wish Linux had something as good as Visual Studio.

        • by mcl630 ( 1839996 ) on Monday March 12, 2018 @06:46PM (#56249443)

          They do... it's called Visual Studio Code for Linux.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      True at my work! Currently re-writing the universe using C++ on Linux. Legacy stuff is C# on Windows. No one so much as reminisces about any "good old days". All devs are happier now.

    • by Greyfox ( 87712 )
      There's definitely some of that going on as developers try to pad their resumes with the likes of go and rust. At least the ruby fad seems to be dying down a bit. I still get way too many recruiters approaching me about ruby positions, and I really don't think I can maintain another production project in that language.
    • Re:BS (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Kjella ( 173770 ) on Monday March 12, 2018 @05:03PM (#56248859) Homepage

      As a guy who has spent most of his time in Microsoft dev environments, I can tell you the momentum is going in exactly the opposite direction: "how can we dump Microsoft/Oracle/IBM and how fast can we do it" is the current direction of the smart enterprise.

      Every enterprise customer thinks what they have is terrible but usually end up switching to a different enterprise vendor and discover that it's equally terrible. Then they try home brew and discover that people develop in ten different languages with a hundred different frameworks and technologies and that Ruby on Rails, Python, PHP, Node.JS and ASP.Net don't mix well and start running consolidation and standardization projects and if you're really unlucky they call in SAP or some other big ERP to gut the whole mess. We still have a solution written in VB6, whatever you pick now expect you'll be stuck with it 10-20 years from now long after the fad is over and it's legacy technology you want to kill with fire.

    • by DogDude ( 805747 )
      Microsoft offers the best in class in many cases. Especially among small businesses, their stuff is very affordable, too.
      • by rtb61 ( 674572 )

        Still just a pretty lame M$ pump piece, how to tell it's a pump piece, the hid what they did not want you to see. Sure they sure they set the order of the most used programs but where is the numbers behind it, you know like percentages. Look if number one is getting say 50% and number 14 is getting 0.5% who cares, what the hell number fourteen is doing when it beats out number 15 who got 0.49 percent. Only one reason to hide the numbers that really counted and only show the B$ meaningless numbers, the real

    • by Tablizer ( 95088 )

      As a guy who has spent most of his time in Microsoft dev environments, I can tell you the momentum is going in exactly the opposite direction: "how can we dump Microsoft/Oracle/IBM and how fast can we do it" is the current direction of the smart enterprise. [Emphasis added]

      That may indeed be true IF you consider that most enterprises are NOT smart.

      The enterprise world is a Dilbertian distopia.

    • You'd rather use Java than C# ?
  • While it's always interesting to see what is going in and out of GitHub, I don't feel like it's going to be a good predictor of what you should be focusing on to be highly desirable in the market six months to a year in a future (when you've mastered programming in the language).

    If I was coaching somebody looking at what to look at towards the future, I would be recommending (in order of priority) Go, WebAssembly (built from C source) and then Swift will probably be in high demand towards the end of 2018 with few coders skilled in them and there being a need for apps on the Google, Mac and web platforms.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      Depends on that person's career objectives:
      If they want jump jobs every 2 years and in between employment gigs learn the new language of the week, your advise is great and if they ride a bubble up they'll be rich.

      If they want steady, stable (but maybe more boring) employment, recommend C that was been in the top 10 since the lists started.

    • by Dutch Gun ( 899105 ) on Monday March 12, 2018 @11:14PM (#56250513)

      I'd first ask them what sort of programming career they'd be interested in, and then tailor my recommendations from there. There are many industries which are heavily skewed towards particular languages. Which do you think would be the most important language in the following fields?

      * Videogame programming
      * Web programming
      * Enterprise application programming
      * Mobile development
      * Scientific and engineering programming

      The languages a programmer would want to learn is likely different for each one of these career paths. In the case of my particular career (videogames), you'd be offering terrible advice. C++ completely dominates AAA game development, followed by C#, and a smattering of also-rans.

      Programming languages don't exist in a vacuum. They all have strengths and weaknesses, and trying to distill them into a generic popularity contest is a mistake, at least when it comes to career choices.

  • by Prien715 ( 251944 ) <agnosticpopeNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Monday March 12, 2018 @04:03PM (#56248551) Journal

    The top 10 programming languages [include]...CSS

    That tells you all you need to know about this "study". CSS is a mark-up language -- not a programming language (unless you're on the sadistic side as it is technically Turing complete).

    • I'd call it a data structure serialization/external format, seeing as mark-up languages actually mark up some prose.
    • by jetkust ( 596906 )
      They likely know what CSS is. There was just no point in making that distinction, since like you just mentioned, there is no specific rule that eliminates it from being a "programming language".
      • there is no specific rule that eliminates it from being a "programming language".

        There is a in fact [wikipedia.org] a difference. No one uses it as a programming languages, except for purposes of discussions such as this one.

        • by jetkust ( 596906 )

          there is no specific rule that eliminates it from being a "programming language".

          There is a in fact [wikipedia.org] a difference. No one uses it as a programming languages, except for purposes of discussions such as this one.

          It didn't take me long to find this:
          https://medium.mybridge.co/26-... [mybridge.co]
          and this:
          https://codepen.io/collection/... [codepen.io]

          They are using the term programming language for simplicity sake, and are not technically incorrect.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      CSS is starting to get SOME scripting language-ish things embedded into it. For example, calc() is a rudimentary expression evaluator that can add, subtract, multiply, and divide very basic expressions (e.g. calc(100% - 50px);). But is it a scripting language? As far as I know, CSS is not Turing-complete (yet) but is certainly a pain to parse into lexical tokens.

      Microsoft created the 'behavior' back around IE 5.5, which would load and execute an external bit of code from CSS. Don't know (and don't reall

  • There are different lists and get completely different results. Just because a lot of stuff is being talked about doesn't mean it's being used, it just means it's difficult to use and whoever tries needs a lot of help (eg. anything Microsoft)

  • Microsoft has a history of seeking/creating a monopoly regardless of what dirty tactics they might use and this would be no different if true. They'd like nothing better than to be the sole source of all things computing, and to become the de-facto owner/operator of anything with a microprocessor in it.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    In the actual article all that was pointed out was PowerShell and TypeScript are rising (both ranked #17). PowerShell isn't really a language it's just like bash for Azure. TypeScript is probably gaining popularity due to its use in Angular 2 (or whatever the hell it's being called these days).

  • There's a place for both dynamic and static/compiled (s/c) languages. The problem is that there's not enough mature competitors in the s/c field for general application development. It's mostly a race between Java and MS (C#/VBnet), but Oracle screwed up Java via lawsuits and other missteps, making MS more attractive relative speaking.

    Dynamic language interpreters are generally easier to design and implement than compilers because the type system is simpler or non-existent ("tag-free typing"); and it's easi

  • That name is awfully suspicious.
  • by NotSoHeavyD3 ( 1400425 ) on Monday March 12, 2018 @07:29PM (#56249669)
    JavaScript remains the most popular programming language

    -----

    Popular as in used because it's the only option, not because people want to use it over pretty much anything else.

  • Here's the thing: I really wanted to hate C#, but it's better than C++. What they did is look at all the common mistakes programmers made in C++, and tried to design a language it was impossible to make those mistakes in. Combined with managed code, it makes bad programmers more productive. Of course, it's slow, bloated, and tied to the Microsoft/WIndows ecosystem. But if I was offshoring all my Windows work to India, I'd be happier if they were using C#. Of course, if were developing in Linux or for multip
    • by geoskd ( 321194 )

      What they did is look at all the common mistakes programmers made in C++, and tried to design a language it was impossible to make those mistakes in.

      If you want to make furniture, you need to have some sharp woodworking tools. Insisting that a rubber mallet is the right tool for the job because nobody every cuts their fingers off with one is just plain ignorant.

      C#, in ironic contrast to the name, is a rubber mallet. In the programming world, it just isn't that useful.

      Just because a language lets more people create programs doesn't even remotely mean that any of those "programmers" have any business near a computer.

    • by ndykman ( 659315 )

      .Net Core has been running on Linux for over a year, and while you don't get everything, you get quite a lot. It's not nearly as tied to Windows as it used to be and it is become more of it's own independent ecosystem.

  • by geoskd ( 321194 ) on Monday March 12, 2018 @10:15PM (#56250335)

    Redmonks statistical methods and analysis are horribly biased. Can we please stop quoting any conclusions he comes to? They are completely useless at best and actively misleading at worst.

    If you want to know what is really going on in the CS world, look to the IEEE; everyone else has an agenda they are pushing...

  • Languages for LOOOOOOOSERS

  • Not disparage ms.mash's excellent summary here, but I wrote this one, too, last week, and mine seemed to get lost in the firehose. I am new to Slashdot. Do duplicates happen often? Here's mine - https://slashdot.org/submissio... [slashdot.org]

On a paper submitted by a physicist colleague: "This isn't right. This isn't even wrong." -- Wolfgang Pauli

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