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Mozilla Project Turns 5 284

Posted by timothy
from the child-prodigy dept.
GreyWolf3000 writes "As this notice in tinderbox shows, Mozilla turns five years old today. A great testament to the ability of open software models debunking the myth that while the community can hack a kernel or compiler together, we can't build a large scale project designed for everyday folks to use. The trunk is feature frozen for the upcoming alpha release for 1.4. Can't wait to see what's in store next!" Read on for another odometer reading -- Mozilla's 200,000th bug report, perhaps just as auspicious a landmark.

zzxc writes "The 200,000th bug has been filed in Mozilla's bugzilla, MozillaZine reports. It was filed at 5:11pm EDT. (21:11GMT) The bug, which is already 'verified invalid,' is 'MailNews crashes after extremely long 'joke of the day' html spam mail.' This comes on the 5 year anniversery of the release of Netscape's source code, also reported by MozillaZine. Bug 100000 was opened on 9/16/01 after three years of development, while bug 200000 comes in less than 19 months from the previous milestone."

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Mozilla Project Turns 5

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  • Wow... (Score:3, Funny)

    by zzzmarcus (183118) on Monday March 31, 2003 @07:02PM (#5634233)
    That's only 109 bugs a day! Just goes to show you open source software IS less buggy than commercial!
    • I know you're joking but for those that haven't had the thrill of working a debug queue, 200000 is the number of bugs submitted. However, a lot of these are duplicate submissions, not bugs, fixed etc. Not to say there AREN'T bugs in Mozilla but I'd bet any amount of money anyone is willing to put up that there aren't 200000 distinct bugs.
    • Re:Wow... (Score:3, Informative)

      by BZ (40346)
      Of the 96 bugs filed so far today, about half are already marked DUPLICATE or INVALID... Of the rest, at least 2/3 will be marked so as well, it'll just take a few days.

      So yes, that's 109 bug reports a day, most of which are useless.
  • by I_am_Rambi (536614) on Monday March 31, 2003 @07:03PM (#5634239) Homepage
    The kitchen sink [about] that is now also included in Mozilla. Story here [slashdot.org].
  • by weebler (661013) on Monday March 31, 2003 @07:05PM (#5634251)
    "But what's happened to Phoenix?" I hear you ask.
    0.6 is meant to be released RSN, they're going to announce the new name shortly [mozilla.org], in fact.

    Just have some patience, and hopefully it'll be worth it!

    • When mozilla was 100%, pure, un-cut vaporware? Everyone (including myself) looked forward to it with stary-eyed hope. I have to admit that I didn't think much would come of it. I was also kinda annoyed with the "kitchen sink" scenario of mozilla, although otherwise I liked the tabbed browsing and cookie & pop-up blocking.

      then came Phoenix. Much smaller, I think somewhat faster and it works with sites that mozilla (for whatever reason, I don't know) wouldn't work with - First USA online [firstusa.com] was my pers

      • -1, Sig Reply (Score:4, Interesting)

        by pyrrho (167252) on Monday March 31, 2003 @08:19PM (#5634713) Journal
        Computer Science is Applied Philosopy...

        I couldn't agree more. As a software engineer with ~15 years experience... and a BA in Philosophy.

        Indeed, I worked my way through school as a programmer and chose philosophy on purpose because I found that's where the logic courses were.

        (I also took a lot of physics and math which no doubt helps, but the degree is philosophy) I feel the study of various logical abstractions helped widen my perspective. Not to mention you are trained to diagram any set of concept/relationships, which is also quite useful. My diagrams have consistent grammer, and I'm sure this is because I was trained how to create a legend that maps directly to real concepts (e.g. an arrow means something, and is only used for truly identical relationships. Of course, the arrow might mean different things in different diagrams, but within a given diagram: consistency). I'm not sure all Philosophy programs are so rigerous about logic... but it is the one thing, the only thing, that philosophers have any agreement over.
  • Failure? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Musashi Miyamoto (662091) on Monday March 31, 2003 @07:05PM (#5634252)
    This project has proven several things about large scale open source projects:

    - Open source doesnt necessarily mean "instant development". It took over a year before anything useful came of the project.

    - Just because you release something as open source, doesnt mean that thousands will flock and provide free development. Though thousands did flock, as soon as they saw that the code wasnt nearly usable, they gave up immediately. But, now that there is a small core of developers working on it, it is a useful product.

    - Now that it has made some progress, it is more difficult for a closed-source company to compete with it. It exists, and will be difficult to eliminate... There is no company to go out of business to cause Mozilla to disappear.
    • Re:Failure? (Score:2, Insightful)

      by damu (575189)
      I think this can be said about most open source programs, they will take longer to be designed, developed, and distributed. A lot of these projects are not being chased by hard datelines, downsizing, higher up pressure. These projects are most for the love of open source, and most importantly the availability of time from the coders.
    • Open source doesnt necessarily mean "instant development".

      What makes you think it ever meant that? GNU C and GNU C++ took years to catch up with the respective standards. Emacs 19 took so long to come out that it was a standing joke. So what? That's not the point. Open source software development is slow, but it's steady, and an open source software package keeps on living as long as it has users.

      Just because you release something as open source, doesnt mean that thousands will flock and provide fr

      • Re:Success! (Score:3, Insightful)

        by axxackall (579006)
        If Netscape software had remained closed source, it would have disappeared with AOL's absorption of Netscape.

        That's exactly what's happened to Netscape servers (former "Fast Track", Later "iPlanet"). Their code is closed and their usages is limited by AOL and Sun. If Netscape would open the source code of servers as well, today it would be much broader used web-server platform with lots of money due to potential demand for support.

        Those days Netscape web application server has been beating IIS and othe

      • Re:Success! (Score:3, Interesting)

        by asa (33102)
        Konqueror is a much better example of open source at work, and it matured much faster than Mozilla.

        Really? Konqueror supports more of the standards and the existing web than Mozilla does and they did it in a shorter period of time? Got measures?

        How old is Konqueror. I see posts about KHTML from dev newsgroups going back to at least 1998.

        --Asa

    • I don't see many situations where people actually SAY they appreciate all the effort behind the code, but since Mozilla was released with tabbed browsing, it has become probably the one app that I use the most. It's not 100% perfect (nothing really is), but it's a damn fine job. *I* appreciate it. : )
    • > Now that it has made some progress, it is more difficult for a closed-source company to compete with it. It exists, and will be difficult to eliminate... There is no company to go out of business to cause Mozilla to disappear.

      It'll also be harder for closed-source to compete on a feature-by-feature basis.

      I used 3.01 (!) for years because it was vastly easier (but still required a dropdown) to toggle image loading and Javashit; the options required a dropdown and single-tab menu. Inconvenient, bu

    • Now that it has made some progress, it is more difficult for a closed-source company to compete with it.

      What competition? Netscape and Opera have about the same market share as Mozilla with respect to Internet Explorer, i.e. not much at all.

      It exists, and will be difficult to eliminate...

      There has to be something to eliminate first. As of right now Mozilla isn't infringing on Internet Explorer's territory in any way that is either worrying Microsoft or causing a sweeping change in the way websites
      • As of right now Mozilla isn't infringing on Internet Explorer's territory in any way that is either worrying Microsoft or causing a sweeping change in the way websites are designed.

        The first point here doesn't bother me so much as it would have some years ago, but the second point is bothering me. Looking at the browser stats of visitors to my two websites, I'm seeing a wider variety of web browsers than ever before. This is a good thing, and is something we wanted five years ago, but better late than ne

    • Open source doesnt necessarily mean "instant development". It took over a year before anything useful came of the project.

      It took six months to realise what they'd been given was shit and that'd they'd need to start again.

      Now that it has made some progress, it is more difficult for a closed-source company to compete with it.

      For evidence compare IE 6.0 and OE (whatever) with Mozilla 1.0.ish which is where they were about a year or 18 months ago. Now compare IE 6.0 and OE (whatever) with Mozilla 1.3. Th

  • by m00nun1t (588082) on Monday March 31, 2003 @07:06PM (#5634263) Homepage
    "...debunking the myth that while the community can hack a kernel or compiler together, we can't build a large scale project designed for everyday folks to use..."
    Not wanting to rain on their parade, as I agree that Mozilla is a great project, but isn't the only reason they have succeeded building a "large scale project" because of the significant backing of one company (Netscape/AOL)? While the community certainly had a very significant contribution, I think we might be giving it a little more credit than it is due.
  • by Otter (3800) on Monday March 31, 2003 @07:07PM (#5634271) Journal
    It seems like it was just yesterday I was sitting at this desk, reading about it on Slashdot (Over 50 comments! Wow, Taco, your site has really taken off!).

    Ohmigod, where the hell has my life gone?!?!?!?!?!? I'm still even using the same freaking monitor!

  • by PovRayMan (31900) on Monday March 31, 2003 @07:12PM (#5634308) Homepage
    Lets see who have I converted...

    My Dad. Hated popups. Instead of giving him a popup blocker for IE I just installed Mozilla for him and switched his Outlook to Mozilla Mail/News. It did a fine job of importing his contact list. He got nimda through an email which infected his machine when he was using Outlook, so I explained to him that with MozMail he'd be ok. After several months use he loves it. No more bad popups for him while browsing, and email has been just fine.

    That's my only personal success story, maybe if I got out more often ;-). I did turn a few people online to Phoenix and Mozilla with some luck though. I guess it's easier to convert those you personally know... so go celebrate 5 years and convert some more people over!

    • Various friends and family members and many people at work.

      When I first got here there where several websites that people had been having problems with and had been blaming "the network". Well of course on my first day the first thing I did was install Mozilla. After that we where testing with the problem child websites and for whatever reason Mozilla worked *much* better than IE, no one before me had thought of testing with it. With that wedge in the door I started testing with and promoting Mozilla every
    • BULLSHIT.

      Nimda is not transmitted thru email. It's a Worm which is solely propigated via unsecured/unpactched IIS installations.

      Mayhap you should turn off IIS and/or patch his machine before he gets nimda again.

      • Thanks for calling bullshit, but I must be mistaken then. He DID in fact get a virus through email, nimda was the first thing that sounded familiar though. Whatever it was, it was one of those "popular" (read: highly infected around the world) email trojan/virus things.

        He doesn't run IIS on his machine, it's just a simple desktop he uses to surf the web, do some work on, and do email.
      • I'm a network administrator.

        I run a network of 300 workstations and 10 Linux servers. IIS is a dirty word, and no installations are allowed to exist. Indeed, it has NEVER been installed or activated.

        I spent most of last week cleaning Nimda A and E off the network after my dipshit users double clicked on an attachment that spread through the network like a disease, over the file sharing system.

        Oh no. It's not spread through email. It's spread through stupidity. (And network shares.)

        (On a side note, I

        • You administer a network of this size, and you haven't heard of anti-virus [f-prot.com] software?

          Really, everybody knows Mcafee and Norton/Symantec, but F-prot blows these out of the water.

          It's current.

          It's fast (you can run on a P-200 and still have a usable computer!)

          It's cheap. ($2/workstation, $300/server)

          It runs on Windows, Linux, BSD, AIX, DOS, etc.

          We use it on our Linux mail servers with excellent results as a free service to our clients.

          -Ben
      • I call double bullshit!

        Symantec [symantec.com] seems to think differently than you as to how nimda spreads itself.

    • OTOH, Mozilla's performance is abysmal on Windows. It takes long to start up and responds slowly to mouse clicks. This is the case not only with my computer but also that of my friends. I get instant response and rendering from IE. It could well be that Windows somehow hampers Mozilla's functioning. Or it could just be that the XUL/JS combination in Mozilla's UI needs to be speeded up. I wish I could use Mozilla with the same speed and for the same purposes that I use it on Linux, but I have no idea why per
      • Have you tried Mozilla 1.3? It's noticable faster than earlier versions. There is no way that Netscape 6/7 is faster than Mozilla 1.3.
    • Lets see who have I converted...


      About 300 people in our department :-)

    • My wife is a computer tutor, specializing in Seniors. Usually the first thing she'll do in install Mozilla.

      Between blocking popups, and making the web not look like any other window, it seems to be a lot easier for older folks to use. Most of her clients are loaded and call her after being completely stumped by XP, so performance is rarely an issue.

  • Happy here. (Score:3, Insightful)

    by jlrowe (69115) on Monday March 31, 2003 @07:13PM (#5634319)
    I see some negative comments, and I guess I expect some here. But I am quite pleased with Mozilla. It has some nice features, and it has them for free. Spam filtering, pop-up stopper, and on and on.

    The fact is, I needed a browser and email client that is *more* than spartan to replace what I was using, and for mail that was an OS/2 program. With all that Mozilla Mail has, the OS/2 program still has a feature or two I'd like to see added to Mozilla.

    But the bigger thing is that for Microsoft to be displaced to any degree, the software that does it *has* to be blessed with good features. I has to be more than spartan. And like IE, which really isn't free, Mozilla not only gives the impression of free, but *is* free. And 'free' is also required for sucess.

  • A great testament to the ability of open software models debunking the myth that while the community can hack a kernel or compiler together, we can't build a large scale project designed for everyday folks to use.

    Don't get me wrong, I really like Mozilla since it's finally become 1.0, and having switched from IE I wouldn't go back. But (and here's the catch) it still crashes on me a few times a week. After 5 years you'd think they could make a program that's actually stable.

    I keep hoping the bugs wi

    • JavaScript is an ill-conceived hack. 90% of my crashes are due to some problem in JavaScript.
      While Netscape made many great contributions to the world of software, JavaScript was not one of them.

      Mozilla has the burden of having to be backward compatible to alot of cruft I'd just as soon see go away. I'm pretty sure this contributes to the crash rate you experience here.
    • That's just strange. It *hardly ever* crashes for me, and I usually have at least 5 or 6 tabs open, sometimes other windows too. It crashed once last week, but I think that's the only time in the last month or so.
  • I remember back then when Netscape was a powerful company and had more users then MSIE. Those were the days...
  • by Anonymous Coward on Monday March 31, 2003 @07:17PM (#5634349)
    5 years and they haven't even reached 1.4? In 5 years Microsoft went from 3.0 to 95. Pick up the pace, people.
  • by Dajur (168872) on Monday March 31, 2003 @07:18PM (#5634352)
    He must have invented mozilla to celebrate.
  • by DeadSea (69598) on Monday March 31, 2003 @07:18PM (#5634357) Homepage Journal
    Mozilla is a great success, but it is also a great failure. When Netscape first open sourced Mozilla development they were disallusioned. They assumed that developers would flock to the open source development effort. Netscape was looking to win the browser war without spending any money. Not being able to compete against a free product, they were looking at ways to make their product free. It didn't work. Mozilla has only succeeded today becouse Netscape (now AOL) continues to pour money into the project. Most development on the browser is still done by paid employees.

    Mozilla's successes have almost all been side effects. An open bug database is one of the most revolutionary development practices that I have ever seen. Because of Bugzilla, Mozilla has far more useful features than it otherwise would have. If users hadn't been able to get through to developers I doubt that Mozilla would have popup and image blocking.

    Mozilla's release schedule with nightly builds has also been a huge sucess. Mozilla has more people testing very recent versions than any other peice of software I know. Mozilla is now the most stable browser I have ever used, and I don't doubt that the nightly builds (and some talented developers) are the reason.

    Hopefully now that Mozilla is very popular it will attract enough outside developers so that Netscape's original dream of no cost development to win the browser war. There are still some hurdles for developers though. Mozilla is a complicated project with a significant learning curve. It relies on some specific technologies such as XUL and XCOM which don't yet have large numbers of developers.

    • They assumed that developers would flock to the open source development effort. Netscape was looking to win the browser war without spending any money.

      They didn't assume, they hoped, big difference. They also weren't looking to _win_ the browser war, they were looking to keep from being completely flushed away. It was an act of desperation. In certain ways it has succeeded as someone else mentioned, it is at least in a position of it's existence not being totally tied to a single company (i.e. now th
      • Open sourcing Mozilla was an act of desperation, and I'm sure glad Netscape went ahead and did it. After 5 years, Mozilla has a number of outside developers working on it. I read interviews with the thinkers in Netscape that were expecting to have their browser developed for them by open source developers and considerable cost saving. It certainly hasn't happened easily or quickly, but I think that Mozilla is at a point that it wouldn't die even if AOL pulled all support and funding from it.

        For better

        • "It's not an easy road."

          No but it's stil better then burying your product forever. This way you can at least throw it into OSS and hope that one it becomes a thorn in your competitors (read MS) side. In other words it's the final finger before MS kills you and eats you.
        • For better or worse, other companies looking to open source their products have a data point. I'm hoping to see many other closed source products become open source and I'm hoping they have learned from Mozilla. It's not an easy road.

          But one of the reasons that failing companies DON'T go this route is that usually one of the few assets they have that might be attractive to a suitor is their code. To open source it at that late a stage usually will guarantee that no one will buy you out (just try gettin
  • by kirun (658684) on Monday March 31, 2003 @07:21PM (#5634375) Homepage Journal
    Somebody always steps up to be the point-missing point-misser, so for their information, some reasons bug 200,000 isn't as bad as it sounds:
    • Bugzilla carries bugs on the whole mozilla project, including issues with the webtools, etc.
    • Sites which don't work in moz are still tracked by Bugzilla if it's the site's fault.
    • Common bugs gain a large number of duplicate reports
    • A lot of bug reports are RFEs rather than problems
    • Bug reports are also used as trackers for groups of bugs
    • Most of these bugs are fixed or closed, so they don't reflect current Moz quality
    • A large number of bugs are small problems / single platform / hard to reproduce and most users never hit them
    • Everytime I try to view one of Google News's subsections (World, Entertainment, Business, etc), Mozilla locks up, and takes down the entire operating system too (seems like the entire file system stops responding after a minute or so), forcing a hard reboot. Every single last time.

      I'm using Windows ME, and the latest version of Mozilla (1.3).

      Does this happen to anyone else?

      Here is a link to the World section you can try (SAVE YOUR WORK BEFORE IN CASE!):

      http://news.google.com/news/gnworldleftnav.html [google.com]
      • Try blowing away your cache, I have found that sometimes lesser OS's have problems with a particular file and cause all sorts of bad things to happen when they are accessed. It just so happens that web browsers caches are a prime candidate for these are there are so many file saves/deletes in the directory.
      • Uuggh. ME has to be the worst OS MS ever made, and that's saying something. It works fine for me (1.3 under XP Pro).

        However, if you can consistantly reproduce this, report it to Bugzilla, where it has a far better chance of getting fixed than on Slashdot.

  • I've loved Mozilla since I first used it 2 years ago.

    However, with 1.3, I've found one problem. It seems that the "Open Unrequested Windows" option for javascript (used to block popups) is missing now. I haven't been able to find it on new installations to turn it off.

    If anyone knows where it moved to (or if I'm just hallucinating), please let me know.
    • Re:It's been great! (Score:2, Informative)

      by 10sball (80009)
      Preferences > Privacy & Security > Popup Windows

    • Re:It's been great! (Score:5, Informative)

      by Yosho (135835) on Monday March 31, 2003 @07:31PM (#5634452) Homepage
      Yep, they moved it. It's now under Privacy & Security/Popup Windows.

      The way it works has been changed slightly, too; now you can choose to either allow or suppress popups, and provide a list of exceptions. Whenever it suppresses a popup, it displays a little icon in the bottom right that you can click to allow it. I find this to be a little annoying, because I've really found that the only popups I ever got with the "unrequested" option were ones I wanted anyway, and now I have to allow them all...
    • Privacy and Security -> Popup Windows

      You can whitelist/blacksite specific sites now, which is nice.
  • Sweepstake Winner (Score:5, Informative)

    by Gerv (15179) <gerv@@@gerv...net> on Monday March 31, 2003 @07:27PM (#5634418) Homepage
    The following message should be appearing in the Mozilla newsgroups any time now:

    A few minutes ago, at 13:11 PST on 2003-03-31, the 200,000th bug was filed in http://bugzilla.mozilla.org:

    http://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=2000 00

    Rather fittingly, it was filed by Chris Hofmann, head honcho of Netscape's embedding team and staunch Mozilla supporter, and is titled "joke of the day spam mail crash". (Note: please don't mess with the bug.)

    Consulting my records, I see that the closest guess to the actual date and time was made by:

    1st: 2003-04-01 00:00:01 bradangelcyk@hotmail.com (10 hrs, 50 mins)

    a mere 10 hours and 50 minutes out. Congratulations to him; he wins a Mozilla 1.0 CD if he sends me his address.

    Runners-up:

    2nd: 2003-04-02 10:15:36 coch@myrealbox.com (45 hrs, 05 mins)
    3rd: 2003-04-02 16:12:44 crisscott@netzero.net (51 hrs, 02 mins)

    coch@myrealbox.com wins the I-have-a-Bugzilla-account-and-so-am-not-a-random-S lashdotter category.

    Not every entry had an equal chance of winning the prize. Nine people submitted dates which were before the contest started (clue: this year is 2003, chaps, not 2002), and several people thought we were going to file 20,000 bugs in a matter of about a week. One person thought that he'd get away from the crowd by guessing a date in the 13th month of 2003 (what does he know that we don't?), and the furthest out two guesses had us still struggling towards the mark this time next year.

    Thanks to all who took part :-)

    Gerv
  • The trunk is feature frozen for the upcoming alpha release for 1.4.

    While a minor mistake, the Mozilla is in feature freeze for the 1.4 BETA release, it's already in "alpha".
    • no, 1.4a hasn't been released yet. It's not on the release page [mozilla.org] anyway.

      Speaking of that page, I'd like to know why they keep old 1.1, 1.2, and 1.3 alpha and beta releases around. Shouldn't they take those down after the final releases? I mean, who in tarnation is going to download 1.1a? Even if you want to keep them on an FTP server somewhere, at least take them off the Releases page.
  • "Microsoft made history today, when the total number of bug reports for the various versions of the Windows shell and operating system eclipsed the total population of the planet..."
  • by Bluefirebird (649667) on Monday March 31, 2003 @07:43PM (#5634525)
    One thing I hate.. but I can't all it a bug is that when I open a link in a new window or tab and it fails to connect, the browser shows a stupid dialog box and the URL of that page is about:blank.
    This way I can't refresh because I lost the URL.
    Sometimes I open several tabs and I need to know which links correspond to the failed windows so that I can reopen.
    I think IE tries to connect twice before failing.
    • One thing I hate.. but I can't all it a bug is that when I open a link in a new window or tab and it fails to connect, the browser shows a stupid dialog box and the URL of that page is about:blank.

      This bug has already been reported [mozilla.org] .

      Note that you'll have to cut-and-paste the URL; Mozilla doesn't allow links into Bugzilla from Slashdot.

    • by Anonymous Coward
      The solution should be a selectable option of:
      A: Display the blank page
      B: Blank page with your URL set as a link
      C: No connection page but still has your URL in the location bar.
      D: Some fancy page you would like; in particular a search engin with the URL in the search field. This should be customized so you can say the web form variable X will contain the URL or better yet be able break it down to some componets as well.

      just a thought
  • I love how Netscape, since they own the rights to the Mozilla code, uses it directly for their browser... except like a year after Mozilla implements it. They're like the older, slower brother.
    • Re:Netscape (Score:5, Informative)

      by asa (33102) <asa@mozilla.com> on Tuesday April 01, 2003 @01:30AM (#5636339) Homepage
      "I love how Netscape, since they own the rights to the Mozilla code, uses it directly for their browser"

      Netscape doesn't "own the rights to the Mozilla code". They are the copyright holder to some of it. But so are scores of people not employed by Netscape. Mozilla is available under the terms of the MPL, the GPL or the LGPL and that means that anyone can use and modify the code and the kind of ownership you're suggesting just doesn't exist or doesn't matter.

      --Asa
  • by Anonvmous Coward (589068) on Monday March 31, 2003 @07:58PM (#5634613)
    " A great testament to the ability of open software models debunking the myth that while the community can hack a kernel or compiler together, we can't build a large scale project designed for everyday folks to use."

    It took nearly 5 years to get to version 1. At that rate, a few monkeys accessorized with keyboards could have accomplished that.

    Don't get me wrong, Mozilla's a wonderful tool for the interent. I'm glad to see IE getting a run for its money. I just don't feel that any myths were shattered here.

    1.) It took aaaaaaaaages.

    2.) For the most part, the hard work was done and the tough decisions were made. Mozilla wasn't exactly paving the way for the internet as we see it today.

    3.) It was necessary. Linux needed a AAA browser. If a good browser for Linux wasn't in demand, how far would it have gone?

    I guess what I'm saying is that it's a logical evolution, not necessarily a challenge for the community. Get the community to put together an ambitious game, then we'll shatter a few myths.

    • "It took nearly 5 years to get to version 1"

      So what? It was usable way before it got to 1.0. Why do you care so much about version numbers?
      Is windows 2000 1996.5 times better then nt 3.5?
      • " Why do you care so much about version numbers?"

        Because it wasn't at a state that they were comfortable with yet, that's why.
        • Again why do you care? I have been using since version .6 something. It was usable back then and it's great now.
          • "Again why do you care? I have been using since version .6 something. It was usable back then and it's great now."

            Faulty logic. Just because it was usable to you doesn't mean it was ready to ship. They obviously care or they wouldn't have waited so long for v1 to ship.

            Why do you care about a single detail that doesn't nullify my point?
            • "Faulty logic. Just because it was usable to you doesn't mean it was ready to ship. They obviously care or they wouldn't have waited so long for v1 to ship."

              It is not a product. It is not for sale. It never shipped. It's an open source product. You use it if it's useful to you. To me mozilla was useful two years ago and it got better and faster with every release including the latest 1.3 version.

              It is you who has faulty logic. This is not a product it's a project.
        • So what? It was usable already. If they were Microsoft, they would have just slapped a "version 5" label on it, and then a "version 5.5" label on it, at equivalent stages of development. In fact, thats exactly what Microsoft did. If you really think that a "Version 5.5" from MS means more than a "version 0.9.3 pre-release" from the Mozilla team, then you place way too much stock in version numbers... version numbers are just for marketing in this industry, don't place so much importance on them.

    • by error0x100 (516413) on Monday March 31, 2003 @11:42PM (#5635780)

      It took nearly 5 years to get to version 1. At that rate, a few monkeys accessorized with keyboards could have accomplished that.

      Version numbers don't mean much. Look at it in this light: even though Mozilla is "version 1", it is functionally / feature-wise pretty much on par with Internet Explorer "version 6". And the stability of the one or two years worth of betas leading up to version 1 was also not all that different to the stability of IE version 5 and 5.5.

      Personally I think they should have just called Mozilla 1 "Mozilla 6". At least it would provide a more accurate representation of the level of quality of the product as compared to other similar products, to all those people out there who seem to think a version number means anything ("What? They're only at version 1 now? Ha, IE is at version 6").

  • I was going to say something really inspirational and uplifting here but my darn browser crashed and I lost my train of thought. Trust me...it was profound.

    Anyway, kudos to the Mozilla team. Long live Mozilla! Cross platform browsers rock!

    Hey...I know this is probably a bad venue for a bug report but the new Junk mail filtering doesn't seem to work if you're using movemail. Can you guys take a look at this please :-)
  • i think mozilla while a great engine in geko dropped the ball.. the fact that apple chose khtml over geko is really something they shoudl think about. The mozilla team should have focused on getting something that *works well* out then adding features and not the other way around. oh yeah and the red star communst logo is really sad.
    • Re:dropped ball (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Gefd (562296)
      I think the fact that apple chose khtml over gecko speaks more to apples goals than it does the the comparitive quality of the two engines. Though I agree that mozilla's development focus should be more toward quality than 'quantity', I happily use mozilla, and it *works well* for me.

      - Gef
  • by mrm677 (456727) on Monday March 31, 2003 @08:04PM (#5634641)
    At my previous job at a Fortune-100 company, the proprietary bug database we used kept track of the Bug ID with an unsigned 16-bit number.

    Yep, to the surprise and dismay of many, we overflowed at bug# 65537

  • It's awesome we're even still talking about Mozilla considering the doom [macworld.com] and gloom [macworld.com] that was spewed because it didn't result in an instant competitor to IE.

    Mozilla isn't perfect, but we're all better off living in world with a valid browser alternative.

  • "...a large scale project designed for everyday folks to use."

    Mozilla is a lot of things, including my primary browser across three platforms.

    However whenever I point out the lack of "completeness" especially with regards to documentation and formalisation of a product, I'm reminded (usually quite gently, bless the developers) that mozilla isn't and never was intended to be a complete browser. I'm told it's intended as a code base, a core for others to use, but it's not supposed to be a feature-and-docum

[Crash programs] fail because they are based on the theory that, with nine women pregnant, you can get a baby a month. -- Wernher von Braun

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