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PHP Programming

Drupal Needs a New Home 295

Posted by timothy
from the new-slash-home-that-is dept.
reardonsteel writes "All of the Drupal websites were offline for about two days because of a server meltdown at the organization's hosting provider. The main Drupal website is back up with a single temporary page and they've announced a fund-raising drive to raise US$3000 for a new server to be hosted at the Open Source Lab at Oregon State University's server farm. Drupal is the leading open-source (written in PHP) content management system and is used to power tens of thousands of websites, blogs, community sites, etc." At this point, all they need is an actual server, too: the OSL has agreed to provide rack space, bandwidth, power, backup facilities and support.
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Drupal Needs a New Home

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  • by GutBomb (541585) on Sunday July 10, 2005 @03:43PM (#13027783) Homepage
    and the description doesn't give me any indication whatsoever... what the hell is this about? what is drupal, what happened to their server, and why should i care?
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 10, 2005 @03:46PM (#13027801)
    Its an open source project in need of funding. All you need to know!
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 10, 2005 @03:46PM (#13027802)
    In only 12 hours, they have already raised nearly 2000 dollars for the new server, PRIOR to the posting on slashdot. People who care change the world for the BETTER, while those who don't impact it terribly.
  • by moz25 (262020) on Sunday July 10, 2005 @03:55PM (#13027852) Homepage
    What I don't get is why they aren't renting their own dedicated box, so they don't have to own the hardware. You can get a dual Xeon configuration for about $200-300/month and with about 2TB of bandwidth. Of course now they won't have a monthly bill, but every time they need to upgrade the machine or repair it, there are going to be costs.
  • by JasdonLe (680479) on Sunday July 10, 2005 @03:56PM (#13027854) Homepage
    Posts like the parent really irk me. "Why do I care about this project?" it asks as if Slashdot is the parents own personal newsfeed -- only stories pertaining to the life of parent should appear on the front page, or indeed anywhere else within the site. If parent hasn't heard of it, it must not be anything that matters.

    Parent? Meet Google [google.com]. I know it's hard to believe, but this is a site that catalogs the entire internet and allows you to search through them for the information you seek. For example, if you were to type "Drupal" in the text box and hit enter, the website would return thousands of pages that use that term, and would further enlighten you to

    Or you could just use Wikipedia [wikipedia.org], which, of course, has a wonderful page [wikipedia.org] up about Drupal. Oh, but I forgot. You're too busy to do any of that. We should just explain everything to you. Who do you think you are, man? Seriously? Not a web developer, obviously.

  • by Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) on Sunday July 10, 2005 @03:57PM (#13027858)
    Last month, drupal.org alone served more than 3 million pages for 100 Gb of traffic (this does not include any of the other sites or services; non Drupal websites, Drupal mailing list traffic, etc).

    Once they have a new box, why don't they distribute their software and docs up on P2P? surely that'll lighten the network load and cost them less.
  • by PingXao (153057) on Sunday July 10, 2005 @04:00PM (#13027875)
    So what?

    Seriously, I have never heard of Drupal until I saw this article. It may be useful software, very useful, but who knows? FA like this should really start off like this:
    "Drupal, the leading PHP blog server provider, has problems..."

    Then maybe /.ers can figure out what the hell you're talking about. Your pet tech doesn't mean everybody else immediately knows what you're talking about.
  • by Thanatopsis (29786) <despain,brian&gmail,com> on Sunday July 10, 2005 @04:34PM (#13028052) Homepage
    So when MS went down because of a DOS attack, they makes them a poor business partner? They are the richest company in the world, they should always be up right? My point is that sometimes things happen in business that you cannot plan for. Perhaps they were planning on upgrading. I doubt very much this will have ANY impact on drupal's long term acceptance in the community.

    BTW I find the lectures about what you think customers want somewhat annoying. Customers care about having their own systems up and running. While it might be a cause for concern, it's hardly world ending.
  • by suwain_2 (260792) on Sunday July 10, 2005 @04:50PM (#13028146) Journal
    A few reasons I can think of off-hand:
    * Renting higher-end servers gets awfully expensive
    * Adding another hard drive might cost you something like $20/month forever -- if you plan on being around for a long time, it's actaully much cheaper to just buy
    * I've read a few horror stories of people whose dedicated server providers (some at fairly reputable places) had their servers formatted by mistake. With a colocated server, you don't have to worry about a tech transposing a couple digits in your IP and formatting the wrong machine.
  • by Synli (781075) on Sunday July 10, 2005 @04:52PM (#13028165)
    http://sourceforge.net/ [sourceforge.net]
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 10, 2005 @04:57PM (#13028183)
    Yes and where were you before the actual problem? This was already in the works for the last few weeks.

    It is better to OWN your core resources and leverage the other stuff that OSL is offering. They also provide mirroring, 24x7 admin staff familier with and specializing in open source software.

    OSL does NOT REQUIRE an AD for this service. IT's just what they do. What happends when Drupal goes beyond 500GB/month? All this for the price of owning a server. I own my server and you seem to own yours.

    For four years a very few people have born the expense of this while growing at a phenominal rate. While lots of happy users [and some that chose other products :) ]

    Your post just seems a little .... unfortunate.
  • by nsayer (86181) <[moc.ufk] [ta] [reyasn]> on Sunday July 10, 2005 @05:02PM (#13028205) Homepage
    From the sig...

    You can meet many former 'homosexuals'; you will never meet a former 'African-American'."

    Are they trying to say that I'll never meet Michael Jackson?

    Burn, Karma, Burn...

  • by moosesocks (264553) on Sunday July 10, 2005 @05:15PM (#13028262) Homepage
    I'd be cautious grouping it with Slash or nuke. Those are previous-generation CMS systems, and are becoming quite dated.

    Newer stuff such as Drupal, Mambo (which I personally dislike), Textpattern, and other newer CMS systems have embraced emerging web technologies (Ajax, CSS) and are generally written with extremely clean code and have very simplistic ways of operating (mac-like if you would care to make the analogy)

    Slash and nuke are dinosaurs. They may still work fine, but if you're going to make a new site, you'd do yourself a favor to research the newer options. Development on all of the 'old' CMSes has stalled, and little work is being done to improve them.
  • WTF? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by n3k5 (606163) on Sunday July 10, 2005 @05:25PM (#13028300) Journal
    if you need some sort of "content management system" to power your website, you probably aren't the type of person who should be having a web site. It only takes 30 minutes or so to custom build something that does exactly what you want it to [...]
    Are you saying every web site out there should run on software written ad hoc, only for this one site, and every developer who needs more than 30 minutes to build it is an untalented loser?
    [...] rather than spending probably hours configuring some bizarre conglomeration of weird things, that you'll then have to spend hours trying to figure out the code, if you have to make changes at that level.
    I see, so you were unable to find one of the CMSs that run admirably right out of the box/package and offer lots of great features, and now you're pissed at CMSs in general and refuse to touch any of them again? There are several open source solutions you can get into at the source level in just one afternoon, which pays off in days and weeks of time saved every time you need to make a change or set up another site. I particularly like systems like Antville and Textpattern that let you change large parts of their own code right within your site itself. These aren't full blown, enterprise grade CMSs, but as these take months to develop, that's not what you're thinking of anyway. In 30 minutes you can write a little CGI script, but that won't offer validated HTML and CSS that works with pretty much every user agent, secure user accounts with multiple levels of privileges, etc. etc. Furthermore, your notion that only software developers should have web sites is just plain bonkers.

    Or maybe there was some misunderstanding you could clear up?
  • Re:.....wtf (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Salamander (33735) <jeff@p[ ]typ.us ['l.a' in gap]> on Sunday July 10, 2005 @07:31PM (#13029050) Homepage Journal
    It only takes 30 minutes or so to custom build something that does exactly what you want it to, rather than spending probably hours configuring some bizarre conglomeration of weird things, that you'll then have to spend hours trying to figure out the code, if you have to make changes at that level.

    Bull. I used to write all of the code for my own website. It probably took me about a week of full-time-equivalent work, and it worked OK, but that's still a far cry from half an hour. Don't give me any of that crap about it being because you're a better programmer, either. I work on kernels and distributed systems for a living, and have done for over a decade. Web programming is something I do as a break from real work because it's so easy by comparison. Nonetheless, all you can get in half an hour is something that sucks. If you want something that's modular and maintainable, that takes more time. If you want something that's database-efficient, that takes more time...and flat-file-based systems are even worse so don't go there. If you want something that's standards-compliant, that takes more time...and your main page generated 130 errors when I ran it through the W3C validator. If you want it not to look like crap (again unlike your site) that takes more time. If you want to have features like markup in comments and comment preview, decent archive management, categories, and search (again unlike...) that takes more time. If you want to do all of those things and have it be secure, that takes more time; not knowing how to implement features securely is a poor excuse for having a low-functionality site. Do all that in under the week it took me, and I'll be impressed. So far, not even close.

    My guess, based on your comment, is that you're another victim of the rewrite bug that often afflicts junior programmers. Writing code is not necessarily more efficient than reading other people's, but it is generally more fun so kiddies always want to rewrite everything in sight. What they end up with isn't usually any better, though. Most code that's written as an excuse not to understand something that already existed sucks far worse than what it replaces. That's why most of the people who roll their own website never even have the balls to make the result available for others to see. They know that it's a lot easier to claim superiority than to prove it.

    if you need some sort of "content management system" to power your website, you probably aren't the type of person who should be having a web site.

    That's the most offensive thing about your post, and why I went out of my way to be offensive right back. Sure, maybe you and I can (with varying degrees of success) write code to do the things that a typical weblog does, but why should we be the only ones to have sites? Why shouldn't high-school students and grandmothers have them too? Sure, most of what they write is crap, but so is most of what geeks write (including here). What purpose is served by having someone who might be able to contribute code in some other domain that you know nothing about have to learn your most treasured skills as the price of entry to the world of website ownership? What if their contribution is something other than code - like scientific knowledge or political insight? Aren't those valuable too? Thinking that everyone should value what you value is beyond elitist, and contrary to the spirit of free enterprise. It's just a crutch for insecurity, not a valid or useful attitude. It's almost as pathetic as posting fake-IQ-test results to your blog.

  • Re:.....wtf (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 10, 2005 @09:06PM (#13029602)
    My guess, based on your comment, is that you're another victim of the rewrite bug that often afflicts junior programmers. Writing code is not necessarily more efficient than reading other people's, but it is generally more fun so kiddies always want to rewrite everything in sight. What they end up with isn't usually any better, though. Most code that's written as an excuse not to understand something that already existed sucks far worse than what it replaces.

    Well, it turns out, you're right. I went to his site and thought, "hmm, a blog system with comments and trackbacks, maybe he does have a point if he built this whole thing in 30 minutes." But then I tried his system. Anyone can add comments -- comment spam could (and probably eventually will) overrun his system. In addition, I was able to easily drop JavaScript code into the comments and it was executed! Of course, I only dropped in a harmless JavaScript alert, as I don't want to get in trouble for "hacking" a neophyte's crappy blog system.

    But in any case, to the grandparent post: my God, man, you cannot build such a shoddy, terrible system, and then tout the benefits of reinventing the wheel. Your wheel is awful, and better people before you have built wheels that put yours to shame. Yours is bad enough to actually be dangerous. It's a black-hat's wet dream. SQL injection, code insertion, you don't even launder your input! I fear for your site and the server that hosts it.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 10, 2005 @10:26PM (#13029911)
    Zope with Plone is the most superior CMS around.
    Object orientated is the way to go.

As long as we're going to reinvent the wheel again, we might as well try making it round this time. - Mike Dennison

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