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AppJet Offers Browser-Based Coding How-To, Hosting 63

Posted by kdawson
from the talk-about-rapid dept.
theodp writes "Know someone who wants to learn to program? Paul Graham advises programmer wannabes to check out The Absolute Beginner's Guide to Programming on the Web from AppJet, which aims to be 'the funnest and easiest way for a beginner to get started programming.' Setting the guide apart from other tutorials is the ability to edit and run any of the all-Javascript examples directly in your browser. Newcomers to programming and experienced developers alike can also publish their AppJet creations on the web. Sure beats GE BASIC on the General Electric Time-Sharing Service!"
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AppJet Offers Browser-Based Coding How-To, Hosting

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  • by crenshawsgc (1228894) on Tuesday September 02, 2008 @03:52PM (#24848771)
    When they say "funnest" I assume they mean "most fun," correct? I'm not a programmer but from what I understand, proper syntax can be important. When the site designers have gotten a better grasp of the English language, I'll trust their programming advice.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by jellomizer (103300)

      Computer programmers are the sort of people who come up with their own language.... and sometimes implement it. It is not about correct spelling and grammar just consistent spelling and grammar.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward
        Actually, the majority of them are the ones who have to abide by the syntax of an existing language.
        • by jellomizer (103300) on Tuesday September 02, 2008 @04:19PM (#24849227)

          Well most languages have a small set of fixed syntax and a wider set of custom made syntaxes.

          Remember the old joke about the programmer having trouble getting his code to compile, and some guy (a non-programmer) looks at it quickly and proudly proclaims "Oh, I see the problem. You spelled studio wrong."

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          Actually, the majority of them are the ones who have to abide by the syntax of an existing language.

          Unless you happen to be Guido van Rossum. In which case, you don't even have to abide by the syntax of your OWN language! :-P

          (Note to humorless, Python programming mods: Guido is my personal hero and Python is my favorite interpreted language. Really.)

    • Hey, these people know what they are talking about.
      I mean I don't see you with a Fungineering degree.

    • Re:by "funnest" (Score:5, Informative)

      by lysergic.acid (845423) on Tuesday September 02, 2008 @04:30PM (#24849469) Homepage

      i had no idea that "funnest" wasn't a word.

      actually, i'm still not quite sure. a search on reference.com [reference.com] yields:

      No results found for funnest.
      Did you mean funnest (in dictionary) or Fingest (in encyclopedia)?

      Dictionary suggestions:
      funnest
      fun nest
      fun-nest
      funniest
      ...

      i'll just go with funniest.

    • by aiba (628946)
      I am the author of the front page of the guide, and I chose the word "funnest".
      It should be noted that "funnest" currently appears on the front page of apple.com. "The funnest ipod ever".
      I stand by my word choice and reject your dogmatic adherence to pedantic and schoolmarmish rules.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Been using AppJet for a while (I was among the earliest members) and I'm really glad to see them featured. AppJet's founders have done a wonderful job creating an easy to use and powerful language. They consistently communicate with their community (they offer personalized help in the forums), and have been creating new features and aspects of AppJet right from the beginning. However, be warned: AppJet really is a beta, and there are occasionally bugs. They're rectified very quickly however. I highly r

    • Language (Score:3, Informative)

      by DragonWriter (970822)

      AppJet's founders have done a wonderful job creating an easy to use and powerful language.

      The language is JavaScript. AppJet's founders did not create it. They provide a hosting environment and some libraries.

  • How true is this? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Arkitus (1089627) on Tuesday September 02, 2008 @03:55PM (#24848839) Homepage
    From the intoduction page: [appjet.com] "JavaScript is the most prevalent programming language in the world". Something tells me this ain't true... Aren't we getting a little carried away with Javascript?
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by jhouserizer (616566)
      Depends on what you mean by prevalent. Most commonly used? Most people with knowledge of it? Most lines of code written in it? Most platforms that support it? My guess is they mean most prevalent in the sense that it is very likely to be supported/usable on virtually any computer you sit in front of.
      • by Thiez (1281866)

        I guess C still wins. I bet your computer runs C code all the time. There is a C compiler for just about any device that can add two numbers. Many people know C and, in my opinion, it is worth knowing.

        I'd like to see the number of lines of code written in C compared to Javascript.

        C, more or less prevalent than javascript? A no-brainer.

        Having said that, the website is about programming on the web, and in that context, javascript is pretty prevalent.

        • I guess C still wins. I bet your computer runs C code all the time.

          My computer usually runs compiled executables, but if you want to compile every time you run a program, more power to you.

          • by Thiez (1281866)

            Aye, and my C-compiler is written in javascript B-)

            Seriously though, what I meant with 'C code' was 'executable stuff, the source code of which was written in C'. Perhaps I should have been more clear (although, being blessed with great powers of denial and self-deception, I prefer to think that you are an idiot for not understanding).

        • There is a C compiler for just about any device that can add two numbers.

          I'd love to see a C compiler for a Curta. And not just because it would have a cute name when said aloud

        • by afabbro (33948)

          I guess C still wins.

          You could make a plausible argument for Java - there are far more people with phones than computers. Indeed, SMS is the most widely used application in the world.

          Or if you want to go by transactions, then it's unquestionably COBOL.

      • Same would be true for C or assembler?

  • Example code (Score:1, Redundant)

    by qoncept (599709)
    Setting the guide apart from other tutorials is the ability to edit and run any of the all-Javascript examples directly in your browser.

    Am I reading this correctly or does this book actually include example code?! How revolutionary!
  • Set apart from? (Score:5, Informative)

    by ah.clem (147626) on Tuesday September 02, 2008 @04:03PM (#24848971)

    http://www.w3schools.com/ [w3schools.com] - I use this site to get undergrads up to speed with the programming we do in our shop at the university. It's always worked well, and all the code is runnable in the browser. Pretty good info, too.

    ah.clem

  • by pla (258480) on Tuesday September 02, 2008 @04:03PM (#24848975) Journal

    Another way to find images for your web app is using Google Image Search. When you search for an image and click on a result, you can also click on the "See full-size image" link at the top of the page. This will take you directly to the image in your browser, and you can copy the URL from the browser's location bar, and use that with AppJet's image command.

    So by the third page, they already have you stealing bandwidth by deep-linking images?

    Cool site, but I really hope they have a section on netiquette somewhere in there...

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by pla (258480)
      D'oh! Okay, before you all smack me down, they do indeed mention that as unkosher. Somehow I completely missed that paragraph on my first read.

      Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa...
      • by daeg (828071)

        A Slashdot reader missing entire sections of an article? Unpossible!

        • by Zadaz (950521)

          A Slashdot reader missing entire sections of an article? Unpossible!

          It's only unpossible because the typical reader misses the entire article to begin with. Missing individual parts of an article takes dedication.

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      Go ahead and do it with my site. In fact I enjoy the thought of people linking to my images as they don't realise that people viewing my images from outside of my domain see pics of old man sex and old men with a poo fetish.
    • by lysergic.acid (845423) on Tuesday September 02, 2008 @04:49PM (#24849875) Homepage

      or how about this. if you don't want your images indexed by Google, add 2 short lines in robots.txt:
      User-agent: Googlebot-Image
      Disallow: /images/

      i imagine most webmasters don't mind if someone links to one of their hosted images in a forum post or saves it to their hard drive for personal use. it's only a problem when:
      a.) the hotlink is made from a site like /. which generates huge volumes of traffic.
      b.) the image is being used for commercial purposes.
      c.) the webmaster is a douche.

      if you're a douche, please don't pollute the google image search results with links to your site. google image search provides a useful service to people looking for images online, and also to webmasters who gain traffic from the search results. if this isn't a fair trade to you, then it's very easy to tell google not to index your site (or just particular sections of your site).

      now, some people have very limited bandwidth, so they may want to share their images, but don't want hotlinks. this is very understandable. and most of these webmasters know to prevent outside referrals to images by configuring their web server with the right access rules.

      but if everyone acted like a bunch of tightwads, then Google Image Search would be completely useless. frankly, i'd rather people hotlink images directly from my server for forum posts than to to use a throwaway image host like PhotoBucket and thus contribute to the sea of dead images that you see on internet message boards.

      • by kat_skan (5219)

        Okay, so if you'll indulge me for a moment, I want to make sure I'm not mis-characterizing your position here. You're saying that being annoyed that someone not only decided to use my images without so much as asking permission, but actually went so far as to make me pay for the bandwidth (however minuscule) is being a douche?

        More power to you if you don't mind and even prefer that people hotlink your images, but who are you to berate people who can't or even just don't want to do the same? Why is not wan

        • other people's action don't define you as a douche. your own actions/choices do.

          there are instances when hotlinking is inappropriate. but if everyone were so needlessly selfish and petty, then such useful services as Google Image Search (and the internet to a large degree) would be completely useless.

          there are certain images that you may not want people using at all. that is fine. don't give people public access to those images. and if you don't agree to the trade-offs of being indexed by services such as G

          • by kat_skan (5219)

            I really don't see how being indexed by Google implies carte blanche for anyone to use your content in any context they choose without restriction, aside from the frankly completely arbitrary one precluding commercial use. Would you say the same is true of anything I might publish? If I write a story, is it okay to reprint it wherever you like without so much as an attribution, so long as you don't charge anything?

            Where do you draw the line? If I write a program and depend on Google to direct customers to

            • as i've already stated. google image search only works if site-owners agree to share their images.

              this has nothing to do with gmail. gmail's usefulness to the general public has nothing to do with user contribution. google's gmail service doesn't cease to be useful just because you (or everyone) uses IMAP. their publishing user emails wouldn't make the service more useful either. that's a completely random and nonsensical analogy.

              and i would advise you to research the concept of 'fair use', which i think is

              • by kat_skan (5219)

                this has nothing to do with gmail. gmail's usefulness to the general public has nothing to do with user contribution. google's gmail service doesn't cease to be useful just because you (or everyone) uses IMAP. their publishing user emails wouldn't make the service more useful either. that's a completely random and nonsensical analogy.

                Obviously it wouldn't. But hotlinking material found on Image Search doesn't make Image Search more useful, either. That's just something inconsiderate people with a sense of e

              • You are the douche!

                now, if you only want the benefit of search engine traffic but don't want people to see any part of your site's content without having paid for it first, then you are a douche. and you should be delisted. because if every site had such policies, then google's web search would cease to work.

                If I have content which customers will pay to access, I will charge them for it. If you do not, but believe you have some under development and therefore want to use the Internet for publicity, you have a good reason choose to offer your content free of charge (until you can concoct something profitable). But because you think that due to your lack of a revenue-generator, therefore everybody should refuse the profit you haven't figured out how to earn, you are the douche!

                it is perfectly within your legal rights to be a douche. but that doesn't mean people can't call you out on your douche-like behavior.

  • Setting the guide apart from other tutorials is the ability to edit and run any of the all-Javascript examples directly in your browser

    Sounds tricky. I wonder how do dey do dat?

  • by MikeRT (947531) on Tuesday September 02, 2008 @04:47PM (#24849829) Homepage

    I used to HATE getting into JavaScript before I found JQuery. When I first got into it, I converted a web app that had pages of DOM manipulation code into a series of small chunks of JQuery code. A conservative estimate is that JQuery eliminated 60% of the hand-written DOM manipulation code and such.

    As a contrast, my wife works with a woman who didn't get to use any library, and had to code everything using just the base JavaScript APIs. After several months, she had a bloated beast that barely did anything because she had to implement so many things herself, rather than just making a few calls to JQuery here, or Prototype there.

  • Holy Cow!!! I learned to program in GE BASIC on a General Electric Time-Sharing System, back in 1973. Holy Cow again!!!
  • Heroku? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by SanityInAnarchy (655584) <ninja@slaphack.com> on Tuesday September 02, 2008 @05:49PM (#24850921) Journal

    Not going to look into this in too much depth yet, but it sounds quite a lot like Heroku [heroku.com] -- only less beginner-oriented, and without trying to do server-side javascript.

  • AppJet is pretty cool. It's a great way to write a little one-off web app. You don't have to worry about installing anything, getting hosting, etc etc. You just type some code into the browser-based IDE and you're done.

    My sig in AppJet. [appjet.net]

  • Y'all gotta realize at the time, your choices were COBOL, FORTRAN, JCL, etc. The history is: In 1964 or 1965, the GE manager, Arnold Spielberg (you might have seen his son's movies) came back from a conference where he had seen BASIC. He realized this was a radical thing - a programming language a "normal" engineer or .. (shudder) .. a manager could write a program in - interactively. To that point, *everything* was batch. They first put it on a GE 250, and were the first folks to figure out the interacti
    • I got a couple of details wrong.

      BASIC came from Dartmouth - brainfart.

      BTW - my first programming experience was an ASR33 in our spare bedroom connected to the GE mainframe.

      http://febcm.club.fr/english/gecos_to_gcos8_part_1.htm [febcm.club.fr]

      "Mark-III and General Electric Information System

      In 1964, GE had helped the Dartmouth College NH to develop an interactive system for teaching programming. The hardware was a GE-200 front-ended by a communication processor developed initially for store and forward communication message

  • by Anonymous Coward

    Tetris in /* appjet:version 0.1 */ [appjet.net]
    page.setMode("plain");print(html("""Z=X=[B=A=12];function Y(){for(C
    =[q=c=i=4];f=i--*K;c-=!Z[h+(K+6?p+K:C[i]=p*A-(p/9|0)*145)])p=B[i];for(c?0:K+6?h
    +=K:t?B=C:0;i=K=q--;f+=Z[A+p])k=X[p=h+B[q]]=1;h+=A;if(f|B)for(Z=X,X=[l=228],B=[
    [-7,-20,6,h=17,-9,3,3][t=++t%7]-4,0,1,t-6?-A:2];l--;)for(l%A?l-=l%A*!Z[l]:(P+=
    k++,c=l+=A);--c>A;)Z[c]=Z[c-A];for(S="";i228
    )?i%A?"â-":"â-
    ":"ï¼");D.innerHTML=S+P;Z[5]||setTimeout(Y,i-P)}Y(h=K=t=P=0)

  • You insensitive clod!

    (Yes, really. It was 1969.)

Almost anything derogatory you could say about today's software design would be accurate. -- K.E. Iverson

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