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Microsoft Ignores Usability With All-Caps Menu in Visual Studio 415

Posted by timothy
from the this-glass-house-sure-is-pretty dept.
mikejuk writes "The recent release of Visual Studio 2012 contained a UI element that few believed could make it into the final version — ALL-CAPS menus. After lots of user criticism and disbelief, Microsoft has moved swiftly to do something about it — by tweaking the typography. '... we explored designs with and without uppercase styling. In the end we determined it to be a very effective way of providing structure and emphasis to the top menu area in Visual Studio 2012.' This must be a new meaning of the word 'structure,' because putting the menu items into all-caps means that they are all the same height. When each menu items starts with a cap then there is structure because you can see the change in height, marking the start of the next menu item. The idea that putting a menu into all caps adds structure is something that is very difficult to see. If you wanted to put structure into a menu, well how about color? Oh wait, I forgot the design department dumped color in favour of the 'everything-is-grey UI.' Developers are the people who invented CamelCase to make sure that the structure of run together words would stand out better — and now we are asked to believe that making a menu all-caps adds structure. I don't think so."
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Microsoft Ignores Usability With All-Caps Menu in Visual Studio

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  • by crazyjj (2598719) * on Thursday June 07, 2012 @09:47AM (#40244391)

    You see, MS is so hip, so ahead of the curve, that they know already that COBOL is about to come back into style in the developer world. Soon everything will be in all caps, mainframes will be all the rage, and GUI's will be passe. Apple will be behind the times with their over-designed software, and MS will be out in front with their all caps, command-line interface only version of Windows 9--renamed "DOS 9 FOR TERMINALS."

    GOOD JOB, MICROSOFT!

    • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 07, 2012 @09:51AM (#40244463)
      THEY WERE INTO COMPUTERS WHEN THE GREAT RUNES ROAMED THE DISPLAY. YOU'VE PROBABLY NEVER HEARD OF THEM, THOUGH.








      (Filter error: Don't use so many caps. It's like YELLING. Filter error: Don't use so many caps. It's like YELLING. Filter error: Don't use so many caps. It's like YELLING.)
    • by gbjbaanb (229885) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @09:51AM (#40244465)

      alas mainframes (or at least - thin clients attached to remote processing power somewhere on a network) are back, only they called them "the cloud" this time round to make it sound a bit cooler.

      • by nurb432 (527695)

        Well, regardless of the 'control' people want it is the right way to do things, if you do it properly and have the bandwidth behind it to push all the pretty pixels around that is.

        Tho its true that back in mainframe days bandwidth wasn't a real issue.. but the last time we try the cloud thing the bandwidth wasn't there and it left a bad taste in a lot of peoples mouths.

    • by cpu6502 (1960974)

      Yeah man. It reminds me of my Commodore 64 days..... no, even that had lower-case menus. Um. The 70s computers??? RETRO is back baby! Yeah baby, yeah! ;-)

      BUT AT LEAST IT HAS A MENU.
      Freaking Office 2010 with the ribbon crap confuses the heck out of me, because I can never find the function I want. Where's the undo function? Find-and-replace? Full justification? I know they're in that mess of Egyptian hieroglyphics, but I have no clue where.

      • by beachcoder (2281630) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @10:45AM (#40245285) Homepage

        Freaking Office 2010 with the ribbon crap confuses the heck out of me, because I can never find the function I want. Where's the undo function? Find-and-replace? Full justification? I know they're in that mess of Egyptian hieroglyphics, but I have no clue where.

        CTRL+Z, CTRL+H, CTRL+J?

      • by dslbrian (318993)

        Freaking Office 2010 with the ribbon crap confuses the heck out of me, because I can never find the function I want.

        You need to install UBitMenu [howtogeek.com]. It creates a new tab with the old 2003 menus, so you can at least find things. Their main site is down at the moment, but if you google it you can find it on a download site.

      • Yeah man. It reminds me of my Commodore 64 days..... no, even that had lower-case menus. Um. The 70s computers??? RETRO is back baby! Yeah baby, yeah! ;-)

        BUT AT LEAST IT HAS A MENU.
        Freaking Office 2010 with the ribbon crap confuses the heck out of me, because I can never find the function I want. Where's the undo function? Find-and-replace? Full justification? I know they're in that mess of Egyptian hieroglyphics, but I have no clue where.

        Let me start a stopwatch and see how long it takes me to find each one.

        Undo
        Tab: Title Bar
        Location: Third icon from the left, between Save icon and Redo icon
        Time to find: 0.5 seconds. No, seriously, it's one of the first things you see if you start looking from the top of the window and it's showing no matter which tab you're on.

        Find and Replace
        Tab: Home
        Location: far right
        Titled: "Find" or "Replace"
        Time to find: 3 seconds.

        Full Justification
        Tab: Home
        Location: Paragraph section, bottom row, fourth icon
        Time to

      • by amoeba1911 (978485) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @02:51PM (#40248567) Homepage

        The ribbon bar in Office 2010 is the most unusable piece of crap ever. I had to memorize where all the stuff was before, now I have to re-memorize where all the stuff is because everything is in a new location that is not very intuitive.

        How hard is it to make an interface where I can just TYPE what I want to do? I want to type "line spacing" and have it bring me to the place where I change line spacing. Microsoft with their billions of dollars can't figure out how to do that? Is this a joke? So instead I have to press F1, type "line spacing" and have it show me the tips on how to do the special dance to get to where I want. In a world where the computer has 3 billion cycles per second I shouldn't have to waste my cycles trying to remember what awkward button sequence I have to perform to get the reward.

    • by dcollins (135727)

      They're just taking the Federal CIO seriously -- "Federal CIO Steven VanRoekel quipped, 'I'm recruiting COBOL developers, any out there?,' sending Federal CTO Todd Park into fits of laughter (video)... So what are VanRoekel and Park looking for? 'Bad a** innovators — the baddest a** of the bad a**es out there,' Park explained (video), 'to design, create, and kick a** for America.'"

      BAD A**!!!!!!

      http://yro.slashdot.org/story/12/05/26/1658227/us-ciocto-idea-of-hiring-cobol-coders-laughable [slashdot.org]

  • by Frosty Piss (770223) * on Thursday June 07, 2012 @09:50AM (#40244439)

    Iâ(TM)m horrified. Absolutely shocked. I tell you, this is the final nail in Microsoft and Visual Studioâ(TM)s coffin. Oh, and âoeMy eyes, it burns! The goggles do nothing!â

    • by Anonymous Coward on Thursday June 07, 2012 @10:25AM (#40245003)

      Iâ(TM)m horrified that you canâ(TM)t seem to find a simple apostraphe button on your keyboard. (here's one you can borrow ' actually, here's a bunch ''''''''''')

  • by Viol8 (599362) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @09:52AM (#40244475)

    Previously barring a lot of eye candy that could be turned off , MS did generally get their UI about right. Now with spillover effect from Win8 they seem to have completely lost the plot and this is simply an example of them reloading the gun once more to take aim at whatever is left of their feet.

    • by gestalt_n_pepper (991155) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @10:18AM (#40244883)

      Mod up! This is absurdly true. Office got a new interface that it didn't need that seems no better (just different) from its last interface. Now the same thing is being done for windows. Why not just add a "Tablet/Phone Shell Mode" and be done with it? I'd me much more interested in a faster file system, fast, usable search (still waiting, Microsoft), fewer blue screens, Azure presented in such a way that anyone can host any windows application, legacy or not (Once again, they miss the obvious).

      In the last 20 years, Microsoft has been busy solving problems nobody I know seems to have had. I guess they're just going to continue the tradition.

      • by c (8461) <beauregardcp@gmail.com> on Thursday June 07, 2012 @10:40AM (#40245227)

        > In the last 20 years, Microsoft has been busy solving
        > problems nobody I know seems to have had.

        That's not entirely fair. In the last 10 years, Microsoft has been very busy solving problems they themselves created in the previous 10 years.

        That being said, Windows 8 is looking like they're ready to start another 10 year cycle of creating new problems.

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by Anonymous Coward

        Nah. Ribbon is objectively better than the previous office UI, just look at all the usability studies they did. Watch Jensen Harris's talk about it.

        On the other hand, this is just another fad. People have been capitalising letters in every possible way over time. We had the WordPerfects of the world, we had iPods, we had flickr and finally the obvious next step was to try FILE EDIT VIEW PROJECT BUILD DEBUG TEAM SQL DATA DESIGN FORMAT TOOLS TEST ARCHITECTURE ANALYZE WINDOW HELP.

        I personally believe the probl

      • Well, they have certainly managed to implement the "fewer blue screens" feature. Can't remember the last time I've seen one. Must be a few years by now.

      • > Mod up! This is absurdly true. Office got a new interface that it didn't need that seems no better (just different) from its last interface
        This is due to their business model. Thet must change things every couple of years (make things slightly incompatible or inconsistent) to drive revenue. If they stopped breaking thins then they lose a lot of money. That is why hey drop their techologies for "teh new shiney" every half-decade. Which means everyone investing in their tech will get shafted and loose

    • They make change for change's sake, like car companies. I still hate the icon-based Office 2010.
      The pictures are meaningless for user "discovery", AKA the process where people figure out what is where. So it offers nothing over purely text-based menus and just uses up valuable screen real estate. I love having all those fat bars taking up a grand total of almost 50% of the screen space, crowding out the actual data.

      "Oh! You can reduce them! Just go into blah blah blah cmd prompt tar -xvf..."

    • by Tony Isaac (1301187) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @11:21AM (#40245779) Homepage

      Speaking of Windows 8, maybe they should just get rid of the menus altogether! Instead, you should have to point to an invisible, 2-pixel-wide area of the lower-left corner of the window to see a full-screen page of active tiles representing what Visual Studio can do with your project. Each tile should move, spin, twirl, or change color in some way to keep your eyes busy while you look for the item you want. And since it's hard to do multi-touch on a desktop, it should require two mice to operate!

    • by Darinbob (1142669)

      Visual Studio and before that, Visual Basic and Visual C++ always had really lousy interfaces. When I first used VB I wrote exactly the same program in Delphi, and Delphi was easy to learn and pickup while VB was a constant struggle due to the design. Ie, put all of the hundred or so properties into a menu, sorted alphabetically, so that you use maximum mouse movement to set the 3 properties that you need. It was almost as if the UI for Visual Basic was designed by the typical Visual Basic user. Now I'm

  • Are you surprised? (Score:5, Informative)

    by LizardKing (5245) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @09:53AM (#40244509)
    This is the company that gave us the ribbon. Otherwise known as the chaos strip, since it seems to randomly rearrange itself to ensure that function you're looking for is never less than half a dozen clicks away. It's a bit like a supermarket, where they deliberately move stuff around in order to make shoppers seek out the things they usually buy in the hope they might chance across - and end up buying - things they haven't seen before.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by smooth wombat (796938)

      I would have used the example of, "This is the company that gave us Windows 7." Where they deliberately move stuff around in order to make users play hide and seek or hunt and peck in the hope they might chance across what they are looking for.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Anonymous Coward

      They just upgraded us to office 2007 (yeah I work at one of those companies).

      All I can say is, nailed it on the head with the chaos strip. Fuck that thing is annoying. I mean the old way of doing things was painful, but we were used to it.

      And yeah, it's like they sat down and made a list of the most commonly used features, then made damn sure they would all be on seperate tabs.

      I work on fairly complex (actually out of scope for word.. but it's what has been dictated) documents with a lot of sectioning and p

    • I really don't mind clicking, this is not what is wrong with the ribbon.

      The problem with the ribbon is that you have to think in order to use it. You have to take a moment and think what you want to do so that you can figure out where you have to click in order to find the appropriate tool. It is actually rather well structured if you consider that it is a hard thing to group abstract menu items and tools in a meaningful way. It will work in favor of someone with little or no previous experience, but it is

    • by MrAngryForNoReason (711935) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @11:21AM (#40245775)

      This is the company that gave us the ribbon.

      I understand that if you are someone who knew exactly where every option was then the ribbon would be a step back. But from my point of view it makes it much easier to find features that were previously buried in the menus.

      The point of the ribbon is to expose useful features to the user so they actually use them.

      • by Waccoon (1186667)

        And then once they find something interesting, it disappears, never to be seen again.

        For some reason, people still tell me I should suck it up and accept the new, dynamic Start menu in Windows 7, because it's awesome. Well, it's awesome if you only use 5 programs and you know exactly what you want so you can type in the name. Of course, if that's all you need, then the dynamic menus are redundant, anyway! If you just got the OS and want to see what's there, or if you do a lot of stuff, menus that automat

  • All of the "new UIs" (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward
    It seems that all of the newest UIs - whether they are from Microsoft, Google, Apple, etc. - all suck. They are flat, colorless, abominations where you can't even tell what the user interface elements do or if they are even supposed to be user interface elements. I spent a good amount of time yesterday and today in Visual Studio 2010 and it has a very nice UI. I know they need to "newify" everything in order to say "new and improved" - but damn. All upper case, all grey, all lame.
  • Relearning... (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Atzanteol (99067) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @09:54AM (#40244533) Homepage

    As I understand it road signs (or many of them) in the UK used to be in caps but studies showed that mixed-case was much easier to read (which mattered more as cars got faster) since we're looking for familiar patterns.

    Looks like Microsoft will need to re-learn this lesson...

  • by chaidawg (170956) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @09:55AM (#40244545)

    Only someone who has a website with such bad usability can truly see horrible usability in others' work.

    • I wish I had modpoints...
    • by hjf (703092) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @10:25AM (#40245005) Homepage

      You beat me to it. The guy is whining about "usability" and yet:

      his website is a horrible mix of:

      • Late 2000's Rounded edges
      • Late 1990's Awful Blue and thick lines
      • Early 2000's OS X style rounded button menu
      • Text in the buttons not vertically centered
      • Corners around the silly rounded "logo" aren't transparent
      • I had to move the jQuery picture window to see the stuff, and scroll horizontally to close it clicking on a tiny X
      • "Picture window -> click X to close". Really, usability guy?

      I could go on but I think I've pointed enough mistakes. I can't believe someone with a website like that has the nerve to criticize Microsoft (or anyone) for using uppercase menus.

      • by OverZealous.com (721745) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @11:51AM (#40246179) Homepage

        While I agree with those complaints, every single one of them except the jQuery window problems are design issues, not usability problems.

        The two areas of expertise are independent yet often correlated because they frequently go hand-in-hand during the design of an interface. You can easily have ugly yet highly usable, or stylish and entirely unusable.

        The all upper-case menu is actually a usability issue and a design issue. Not only does it look bad, but it also makes reading more difficult because humans process the shapes of whole words. All uppercase words are basically rectangles. It also makes distinguishing independent menu items more difficult (although proper negative space would help with that).

        But that picture pop-up window thing is atrocious.

  • Structure (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Talderas (1212466) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @09:55AM (#40244553)

    When each menu items starts with a cap then there is structure because you can see the change in height, marking the start of the next menu item.

    Call me blind. But this rant is blown out of proportion. He's complaining about structure, yet there is a very clearly delimited blank space between menu items a blank space which is much large than present in the mixed case version. In fact, I find it a lot easier to read the menu item word in the all capital version compared to the mixed case most based on the large spacing alone.

  • CamelCase (Score:5, Informative)

    by SJHillman (1966756) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @09:58AM (#40244589)

    "Developers are the people who invented CamelCase"

    I think chemists has developers beat by a century or two. Now please pass the NaCl.

    • by Dynedain (141758)

      No kidding. CamelCase is just plain ordinary Title Case with the spaces removed because programming languages expect names to be OneWord.

      • You guys have strange camels where you come from. Around here it's camelCase, the hump is in the middle(ish).

        • by danlip (737336)

          That's drinkingCamelCase (head down) versus StandingCamelCase (head up). Both are camelCase.

  • by khr (708262) <kevinrubin@gmail.com> on Thursday June 07, 2012 @09:59AM (#40244609) Homepage

    Maybe we can come up with backronyms for each of them, that way, like the SQL menu, they can all be acronyms that require capitalization.

  • by JAlexoi (1085785) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @10:00AM (#40244637) Homepage
    The answer is simple, the person that was dictating the names of the menus was a very loud one. So his assistant wrote exactly what he was DICTATING!!!
  • At what point did Microsoft need a justification for anything they do? They just do what they want and expect others to live with it. Look at Windows ME. Look at Vista. It is only when users won't pay they back down.

    The article, which is based on a blog post, mentions that it is not obvious how to change the case. If you read the blog post it says they haven't settled on how Microsoft will expose a change of case feature. My guess is you'll have to customize the menu, just like what's been done in V
  • Project Direction (Score:4, Insightful)

    by brningpyre (2114648) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @10:04AM (#40244683)
    This is such a laughably bad decision, I can't see it making its way into the final product. I even tried to type this post in all-caps, but /. reminded me that it was wrong. When it comes to something people have known and taken for granted for years, it seems very odd that Microsoft would go backwards and decide on this. Exactly where is the leadership for this project?
  • Historically speaking, you really could have stopped right there.

  • Usually a site either has a horizontal scrollbar (if the web designer thought everybody had a screen as large as his), or horse blinkers (if the web designer thought everybody had a screen as small as his, or was just envious of those people who enjoy a larger screen).

    This guy here somehow has managed the feat to have both... and then has the gall to pontificate about usability!

    Congratulations!

  • Somebody nuke it from orbit before the madness spreads to the rest of the country.

    I'm no Apple fan, but somebody on another forum made a great point... Apple doesn't force iOS-like interfaces on desktop users... so WTF is Microsoft so hell bent to do this? It's like they have a perpetual hard on for anything Metro now.

    Is there something I'm missing here? I do not want Metro on my desktop. Windows 7 does everything pretty well, and Windows 8 adds NOTHING that I would care to add to Windows 7.

    Windows 8 is not

  • by Anonymous Coward

    it's been circulating on teh internets _atleast_ since late May.Once VS start reporting back that more and more people are reverting back to regular style menus they'll make it an option inside VS itself, albeit hidden behind some rarely used obscure menu. Nothing to see here, carry on.

    • by bmo (77928)

      it's been circulating on teh internets _atleast_ since late May.Once VS start reporting back that more and more people are reverting back to regular style menus they'll make it an option inside VS itself, albeit hidden behind some rarely used obscure menu. Nothing to see here, carry on.

      You mean like how they removed the registry entry to turn off Metro and have a normal desktop?

      --
      BMO

  • by excelsior_gr (969383) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @10:17AM (#40244873)

    Seriously?

    What happened to the "if it's not broken, don't fix it" motto? Did anyone complain that the menu list, that everyone knows where it is and what is there to expect, did not stand out enough? Or that it lacked any other visual property? At least with the ribbon they tried re-thinking the topic "menu" and took a shot at providing something different (whether you like it or not is another topic). What exactly were they trying to achieve with this modification? What a horrible waste of resources...

    For the record, I find it a bit childish and old-fashioned in caps, but, actually, I couldn't care less.

  • ESL (Score:2, Interesting)

    by xdor (1218206)

    Developing software for a global bank many moons ago, the software recipients preferred/required capitalized menu items and input fields. As English was not their first language, they explained that CAPS were easier for them to read.

    So either Microsoft's focus group is global or their developers are

  • I wonder if a simple adding can fix this. Just walk the menus and change the labels?

  • Sounds like someone forgot to take there OCD meds.
  • by PPH (736903) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @10:29AM (#40245065)

    ... Microsoft's attitude towards its users. Yelling at them.

    Next up: They are going to replace Clippy with a flying chair.

  • It can be turned off (Score:5, Informative)

    by Ececheira (86172) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @10:31AM (#40245107)

    If you go to the source, http://blogs.msdn.com/b/visualstudio/archive/2012/06/05/a-design-with-all-caps.aspx [msdn.com], they note that there will be an option to disable it.

    There's also a blog post that shows the registry key that works today to disable it.

    • Thank you for bringing some sense to this discussion. I miss the days when Microsoft was an evil empire. Back then Slashdot really had something to complain about. You'd get a story about Microsoft destroying competition and whole industries through sabotage and subterfuge, and the Slashdot community would be outraged! Outraged I tell you!

      Now, Slashdot still wants to be outraged at Microsoft, and it really seems like we're scraping the barrel here. Seriously, minutia like top level menu case is not somet
  • by michaelmalak (91262) <michael@michaelmalak.com> on Thursday June 07, 2012 @10:34AM (#40245139) Homepage

    The uppercase is deck chairs. The uppercase does make it look a little cleaner; yes, and the tradeoff is a little harder to read. Not a big deal either way. But if you've read any of the Windows Metro philosophy papers, the "chrome" was supposed to go away and be replaced with blank panels, clean typography, images, and animation -- in short, give desktop apps the same clean appearance as iPhone apps. Then why is there still a strip of little-used icons? Does anyone really click the floppy icon to save? No, of course, not. You either click CTRL-S, or, since it's Visual Studio (and I don't know why Borland and Eclipse don't do this), you just click "Build" and it saves automatically. And all the other icons, I still don't know what they do after 20 years of using Visual Studio.

    After reading the Metro philosophy papers, I was initially excited. I was eager to see how Microsoft was going to adapt its products to the new philosophy. Now I see that has gone the way of Longhorn WinFS. And besides, I've since realized that it's better to target HTML5 (with Canvas -- pixels finally come to HTML) than Metro anyway.

  • THERE IS NOTHING WRONG WITH ALL CAPS TEXT!!!!!!! IT DOESN'T MAKE IT SHOUTING!!!! NEITHER DO EXCLAMATION MARKS!!!! THEY ARE JUST EXTRA PIXELS ON THE SCREEN AND DON"T GENERATE ANY NOISE!!!!@!$!# YOU IDIOTS!!@!%!*!(!)p0!-!!!

    loppity loppity lpooity loppity loppity loo loppity loo tru-da loo bopppity boo boppity Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Aenean augue est, venenatis nec porta a, pellentesque commodo quam. Vestibulum elementum velit commodo mauris accumsan tempus. Ut sagittis feugiat

  • In the 90s, when mass computing was new, software from Microsoft was designed by young, arrogant 20-somethings with no thought for usability or the needs of customers, usually business customers. It's 2012 now, not 1992. The world changed - Microsoft hasn't. Users got older and less tolerant of giggly nonsense and unstable systems. They don't want to learn new stuff. They want to get their tasks done. Period. Businesses need results, not the latest and coolest anything. Cobol still exists for a reason.

    Apple

  • by KiloByte (825081) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @11:00AM (#40245509)

    Meh, using mere ALL CAPS is so ASCII. Can't they at least use CJK doublewidth ("fullwidth") characters (U+FF00..U+FF7E) for yelling? Everything but Slashdot can support those.

  • Looks good to me. (Score:4, Insightful)

    by MaWeiTao (908546) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @11:07AM (#40245607)

    Clearly, whoever wrote that article is not a designer. Capital letters are NOT inherently more difficult to read. They're more difficult when you've got a paragraph of text. But when you're talking about buttons and menu items they can aid in legibility and emphasis.

    In my experience programmers make for the worst designers. Admittedly they have specific needs, but like anyone else they're slaves to habit. So just because they want something a certain way doesn't necessarily make it right. There's always backlash when someone deviates from the expected, even if it's for the better.

    I actually like the all caps approach. The menu items are very clear and legible. They're a lot more distinct than in the traditional initial caps approach. Now, you could argue that it makes them too prominent. It may also have the side effect of de-emphasizing the Application title too far.

    So to suggest that this approach somehow ignores usability is ridiculous.

    I notice that the article also takes a jab at the all-grey interface. If they're going to knock Microsoft for this then they should take aim at the worst offender of all: Apple. I've always found that Windows provides enough contrast between windows, using distinct borders and colored headers, that it's fairly easy to pick them out. In OSX, however, everything blends together.

    I do find it amusing that this I Programmer site is dumping on Microsoft for something so minor when the site itself looks like total shit. Look at that freaking logo of theirs.

    • by Tridus (79566) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @12:38PM (#40246837) Homepage

      The only people worse then programmers at design are designers who have become totally disconnected from their audience. Like say, the ones doing this. The audience is programmers. They probably know what they want, and the areas Visual Studio needs improvement in were not caps locked menus and monochrome grey icons.

      Also, all caps is harder to read: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-15990443 [bbc.co.uk] . We've known this for decades. It was determined before Microsoft existed. They were with the program for a while, then this "Metro" disease showed up in Redmond and now everybody is screwing everything up and calling it Metro (though when they call VS Metro I really don't know what they're talking about, unless Metro is code for ugly).

      And while we're on it, what does Apple have to do with this? You're saying they should bash Apple for something that Microsoft just changed their UI to do. Since Microsoft wasn't doing it and now is, why wouldn't we go after them for screwing it up when they had it right before?

  • by guttentag (313541) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @02:53PM (#40248601) Journal
    Ballmer's communication [youtube.com] style [google.com] (mostly screaming until you are hoarse and jumping around to get attention) is finally starting to assert itself in Microsoft's UI. Expect the next version to include characters that turn red and jump around, chanting when you mouseover them and screaming "GIVE IT UP FOR ME" when you click them:

    FILE!
    FILE!
    FILE!
    EDIT!
    EDIT!
    COPY!
    YEAH! GIVE IT UP FOR ME!!!!

    (Then you wait several seconds for your operating system to catch its breath.)

    I for one am thankful that I know keyboard shortcuts.
  • by gratuitous_arp (1650741) on Thursday June 07, 2012 @05:30PM (#40250689)

    If you wanted to put structure into a menu, well how about color? Oh wait, I forgot the design department dumped color in favour of the 'everything-is-grey UI.'

    How do you determine if this writer was American or English? (Pause) -- That's correct, it's time for a horse race!

    If you wanted to put structure into a menu, well how about color?

    They're out of the gates, and "American Author" sprints into an early lead!

    American: 1
    English: 0

    Oh wait, I forgot the design department dumped color

    Ah, an obstruction in the track! "English Expositor" got its hoof stuck on a sodding large crumpet and is now clomping along alone like a Billy No-Mates! With such a slowdown, it may never catch up, just like the train schedule!

    American: 2
    English: 0

    in favour of the

    But wait, "American Author" has smelled the crumpet and is circling back to investigate! It looks like the rider is shouting to "American Author" at the top of his lungs that its going the wrong way, but he refuses to use his riding crop or otherwise take action to correct the problem.

    Now "European Expositor" is gaining ground fast! A more in-depth genealogy analysis may very well reveal that Bob is, in fact, his uncle!

    American: 2
    English: 1

    'everything-is-grey UI'

    "European Expositor" has shaken off its handicap and they're on the home stretch! They're neck and neck across the finish line -- it's a tie!

    American: 2
    English: 2

    To finish the story, the riders then dismounted and decided to play a tiebreaker match of football. It ended in another tie, one team scoring two touchdowns and the other netting twelve goals.

CCI Power 6/40: one board, a megabyte of cache, and an attitude...

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