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IOS PHP Programming Python

Will Developers Finally Start Coding On the iPad? 463

Posted by samzenpus
from the changing-the-way-things-are-done dept.
An anonymous reader writes "It's not so long since Apple silently dropped the restriction about iOS apps for programming — iPad owners can now code in Lua with Codea or with Python for iOS. Yesterday, a new app called Kodiak PHP brought another IDE to the iPad, this time for PHP coders. Pandodaily's Nathaniel Mott describes it as a full-blooded software development tool with comparison to other iOS apps. Cult of Mac reports that the demise of the Mac might be closer than we think, but are developers really ready to use the on-screen keyboard to do some serious work?"
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Will Developers Finally Start Coding On the iPad?

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:30PM (#41207639)

    my iconia tablet + bluetooth keyboard is all I carry around these days. Plenty of good ide's, can host a webserver on the tablet, and so on and so on.

    Whatever, ipads. . lol

    • by billstewart (78916) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:50PM (#41207811) Journal

      A couple of years ago I finally got an external monitor for my work PC that had more pixels than the Sun 3 I'd used back in the 1980s. (We mainly worked with laptops, and our IT department always thought that having more color depth was more important than more pixels, even though most of us work with text and simple graphics and 16-bit color was plenty. Some years they also thought portability was important, which was nice of them, but had the price of only getting 1024x768.)

      Back when I was younger, 1280x1024 pixels was annoyingly small to do development work in, because it limits how much text you could fit on a screen. Now that I need reading glasses, I not only want more pixels than that, but I want a bigger screen to put them on, and holding the latest generation iPad/MacBook close to my face just means typing is awkward.

    • by gl4ss (559668) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:56PM (#41207891) Homepage Journal

      my iconia tablet + bluetooth keyboard is all I carry around these days. Plenty of good ide's, can host a webserver on the tablet, and so on and so on.

      Whatever, ipads. . lol

      than again, on an android tablet you can(cumbersomely) develop a real android app.
      on an ipad not, unless you use it essentially as just as a dumb terminal to some full mac somewhere.

      it's essentially apples rules about not having a second app store that keep the whole developing fully on an ipad idea at bay for foreseeable future for non-jailbreakers. so it's a matter of politics, not practicalities.

      • by ceoyoyo (59147) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @06:00PM (#41208859)

        on an android tablet you can(cumbersomely) develop a real android app.

        You've got it right there. Developing apps on a tablet is a parlour trick that doesn't really matter. You can do it on Android or a jailbroken iOS device, but nobody cares because it's FAR easier to do it on a bigger computer.

        It was very irritating when Apple forbade interpreters so you couldn't do simple things, but not supporting building full apps isn't really a loss.

        • by oakgrove (845019) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @06:42PM (#41209103)

          Developing apps on a tablet is a parlour trick that doesn't really matter.

          I've never developed an app on Android from start to finish on my tablet but it's a little more than a parlor trick. I keep a few of my lesser important projects in Dropbox and on more than a few occasions felt inspired and whipped out my Galaxy Nexus or Xoom and got to work. The ability to then compile and install right there on the device is awesome in that scenario. The only thing holding something like AIDE [google.com] isn't as capable as a traditional IDE is it hasn't been around long enough for the developers to have had time to include, debug, and ship all the expected features. There is no fundamental reason that given enough time, AIDE or something like it couldn't be a first class development tool for Android.

          • by ZosX (517789)

            i just tried out aide. its pretty sweet. the moment i compiled to an apk and installed i was hooked.

    • by Joce640k (829181) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @04:13PM (#41208027) Homepage

      Do "full blooded software development" and "PHP" belong in the same sentence?

  • Seriously? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by trifus (1576365) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:34PM (#41207667)
    No.
    • by Forty Two Tenfold (1134125) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:42PM (#41207739)
      Oh they will. As soon as Tim Cook does this. [google.com]
    • Re:Seriously? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by dclozier (1002772) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:45PM (#41207753)
      This.

      If you don't have a real keyboard you don't have a real development tool - regardless of the IDE. Sure you can do some programing and you can even use a real keyboard with an ipad - but if your going that far then why not just use a laptop? If portability is an issue then try an ultrabook. The conclusion I have come to though is that most of my development time does not happen while being "mobile" - I'm at a desk somewhere.

      Tablets are a media consumption device. Using them for developing software is like pounding a screw into wood with a hammer.
      • Re:Seriously? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by betterunixthanunix (980855) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:48PM (#41207797)

        If you don't have a real keyboard you don't have a real development tool - regardless of the IDE.

        Someone else pointed out a more fundamental problem: you cannot write iPad software using your iPad. Even if it had a keyboard, that problem would kill the iPad as a software development platform.

        • you cannot write iPad software using your iPad

          . . .today. Tomorrow, who knows?

          • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

            by MogNuts (97512)

            True. For other companies. So normally I would agree with you.

            But this is Apple. They don't care about developers. They don't care about users. It's their way, or the highway.

            But of course the media will always put, at the end of the article, "but Apple will have it in the next version!" as they always do. Even though they don't. Yet they never do this for any other company

            • Re:Today. (Score:5, Insightful)

              by Anonymous Cowardus (2720909) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @04:02PM (#41207927)

              But this is Apple. They don't care about developers. They don't care about users. It's their way, or San Jose's courthouse.

              There. Fixed that for you.

            • Re:Today. (Score:4, Interesting)

              by sideslash (1865434) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @04:26PM (#41208151)

              But this is Apple. They don't care about developers. They don't care about users. It's their way, or the highway.

              OK, I agree that they don't care about developers. Apple treats developers like trash. But Apple does care about users an an aggregate sense, in that their products and marketing are designed to achieve real resonance with hundreds of millions of users and turn them into passionate evangelists. Treating developers badly is actually part of the latter goal. But it is only about money, though. Beyond that, Apple doesn't care about users either.

          • Re:Today. (Score:5, Insightful)

            by betterunixthanunix (980855) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:55PM (#41207877)
            Is there any reason to think that the situation is going to change? I have seen Apple become increasingly restrictive about their products over the past few years; if anything, I have to wonder how long it will be before the iOS MacBook line comes out, so that only Apple's highest-end systems will allow people to write software (and even then, for a fee). What reason does Apple have to loosen the restrictions on the iOS software ecosystem, when they are making so much money?
    • by mosb1000 (710161)

      I use my keyboard less and less for programming. And as others have pointed out, you can get a keyboard for an iPad. People who think this can't happen simply lack imagination.

    • No.

      Yes, seriously, someday iPad apps will be developed on an iPad.

      That day will be when the iPad plugs into a "docking station" and acts as the "cpu" and an external keyboard, mouse, display and storage (HDD, SSD, etc) connect to it through the docking station.

      • by Tapewolf (1639955)

        That day will be when the iPad plugs into a "docking station" and acts as the "cpu" and an external keyboard, mouse, display and storage (HDD, SSD, etc) connect to it through the docking station.

        Doesn't iOS have a sandboxed architecture where applications are restricted to their own private workspace? How's that going to work for a developer toolchain?

    • by captjc (453680)

      My Nintendo 3DS has a neat little toy app called Petit Computer [petitcomputer.com]. It is basically a BASIC interpreter that allows you to write programs and games, and trade them with friends. I also hear tell of a Pokemon typing [wikipedia.org] game that is coming out that features a wireless keyboard for the DS. Even assuming that a patch is made to allow the keyboard to function in Petit Computer, I don't see the point to actually programming on a 3DS. I sure as hell would never want to use a device like that to do serious work.

      I feel t

  • No... (Score:4, Interesting)

    by tangent3 (449222) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:35PM (#41207675)

    ..but if they were serious enough about coding on a tablet, there are plenty of portable hardware keyboards that can be connected to it.

    But really, the IDE apps mentioned don't seem to allow development of actual iOS apps on the device, unlike https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.aide.ui&hl=en [google.com]

    • Re:No... (Score:5, Funny)

      by muon-catalyzed (2483394) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:56PM (#41207883)
      Please, we need programs not apps. Stuff doesn't get done in crippled wooden UI half baked apps. Developers need things like functioning file system, interoperating programs, real task switching, stable kernel, yes, kernel that doesn't crash your 6 hour hard work without even flashing an error. On Linux or Windows you at least get an error and 1st party programs do not hard crash there. Can't really wait for Windows 8 and some solid hardware company like Lenovo or Sony to give me a real system worth coding on - a real tablet experience.
  • Nope (Score:5, Funny)

    by majesticmerc (1353125) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:36PM (#41207689) Homepage

    are developers really ready to use the on-screen keyboard to do some serious work?"

    Speaking for my people, No.

  • Is it just me? (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Shavano (2541114) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:38PM (#41207695)
    or when the rest of you see one of these stories predicting about the demise of desktops, laptops and every other device with a precise user interface and non-negligible computing capacity, do you just want to shoot yourself?
    • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:40PM (#41207713)

      Yes, it is just you who wants to shoot yourself.
      Rational people merely want to shoot the authors of such stories.

    • by c0lo (1497653)

      do you just want to shoot yourself?

      Shoot myself? Why... it's not me that makes moronic predictions.

    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Most people aren't predicting the utter demise of desktops and laptops, they're just predicting (quite correctly, I think) their decline to a more niche and more expensive kind of product. Desktops/Laptops have been riding on the coattails of Joe Sixpack, who never really wanted to do all the things those boxes can do. Joe wants to get onto his Facebook, share some photos on his Tumblr, and maybe watch some Youtube videos. He can do that far easier on a tablet, so the rather accidental mass-market status

    • by MogNuts (97512)

      Yes.

      But I really do wonder. Do all these plant articles and thinly-veiled advertisement "news articles" actually translate to sales? Apple probably because Apple-lovers are morons at this point. But aren't Android tablets dying sales-wise, regardless of the media push? I truly wonder.

    • by Bieeanda (961632)
      No, but when one of the guys that I game with on Fridays does the same thing, I'm tempted to throttle him until I remember that he wouldn't feel a thing through the neck fat...
  • Wonderful news to have real programming available on iOS however my Mac is a lot more than just a keyboard. I see a time when the iOS and MacOS will merge and there will be varying pieces of hardware that runs the new AppleOS (aOS). But just adding a keyboard (which I have) to my iPad does not make my iPad as functional as my Mac. The Mac has a lot more storage (iCloud is not available here in any reliable fast mode) and a lot more ports. My Mac can also play CD's (remember those - sort of like envelopes fo

  • by Shavano (2541114) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:40PM (#41207711)
    * It fits in my purse.
  • by Neil_Brown (1568845) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:41PM (#41207715) Homepage
    But what keeps me using a computer over a tablet, at least so far, as the ease of use — navigation, switching between browser tabs or between applications, ability to split screen and have documents side by side and so on. My coding is minimal, but I do a huge amount of research and writing up my thoughts, and, whilst a tablet has worked its way into my life despite me initially pooh-poohing them as pretty much pointless for the way I tend(ed) to use computers, I cannot see it replacing a computer for the time being.
    • by CastrTroy (595695) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @04:20PM (#41208091) Homepage
      And yet for every person like you there's 100 who only ever use a computer for Facebook and email and gave been waiting for something as simple and useful as the ipad for the past 15 years. Most people have no interest in using a computer to actually accomplish anything and are perfectly happy consuming music books and itsvideos. I probably spend half my time doing the same. And with the price of these things its getting very easy to own both a laptop and a tablet. I've already decided my next phone will be the cheapest available with tethering and opt to spend the difference on a 10 inch tablet
  • by pla (258480) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:43PM (#41207741) Journal
    Why the hell would I want to target a platform that limits devs to basically writing toys (no system level apps, no "arbitrary code execution", no duplication of "useful" apps that would compete with Apple-flavored)?

    And then, even if I did have a great idea for the next "Angry Birds"... Why the hell would I want to target a platform known for giving devs the boot for reasons ranging from "editorial" to "petty" to "borderline illegal vindictive"?

    Thanks, but no thanks. I'll target iDevices as soon as they tear down the wall around the garden, and not before.
  • No. (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Alkonaut (604183) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:45PM (#41207757)
    I wouldn't even use a MacBook Pro keyboard for coding more than a few minutes. Nor would I code on that kind of screen size. Similarly, if I'm writing an email longer than a few sentences, I put my iPad down and reach for the laptop...
  • Probably not (Score:3, Insightful)

    by Todd Knarr (15451) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:46PM (#41207769) Homepage

    Let's face it, when writing a significant app you do a lot of typing. So. Are the iPad's keys roughly the size of a normal keyboard's? That size is significant because it's a comfortable size for human fingers. Much larger and it's awkward to reach between keys, while much smaller and it's awkward to hit just the key you want. Does the iPad's screen allow for keys to be depressed and provide gradual resistance? Those mechanical aspects are important because they provide tactile feedback and avoid having the typist hammering the tips of their fingers on a solid surface (which hurts after a while). Can I keep the iPad's on-screen keyboard only slightly inclined (so it's in line with the plane my fingers occupy while typing) while angling it's display 45 degrees or more up (so it's perpendicular to my line of vision)? That's so I can type comfortably without having to crane my neck or maintain an uncomfortable position to see the screen clearly. As far as I can tell the answer to all of those is "Not without external devices.". So if I'm going to tie myself down to a stand to hold the iPad itself plus a big keyboard and mouse to do my typing on, why wouldn't I go for the conventional desktop with it's larger monitors and more horsepower so I can run builds faster?

    • by Nerdfest (867930)

      ... and so you don't have to deal with arbitrary restrictions about applications and content, nor reward those selling a platform with those restrictions in place.

  • Not Likely (Score:4, Insightful)

    by MLCT (1148749) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:46PM (#41207771)
    Unless coding applications are much much improved from general text input applications, not likely is my answer.

    I can barely be hassled "typing" any more than 3-4 sentence email on an ipad before I get annoyed. In addition to the difficulty of typing, the lack of cursor control (touching to move the cursor is just down to luck as to where exactly it goes) means the entire experience is a retrograde step. Fine for 140 character input, useless if you want to type any lengthy piece of text.

    Tablets are great for some things (content consumption primary amongst them). But honestly, any time I am told that tablets represent a "post-pc" world for content creation (whether professional coding, or simple word processing), I just laugh.
    • by c0lo (1497653)

      I can barely be hassled "typing" any more than 3-4 sentence email on an ipad before I get annoyed.
      Tablets are great for some things (content consumption primary amongst them). But honestly, any time I am told that tablets represent a "post-pc" world for content creation (whether professional coding, or simple word processing), I just laugh.

      Laugh? You can't be serious [theonion.com], can you?

  • A simple game or a visualization of some data? Sure, you might program that on an iPad.

    But for serious work it just lacks the tools. You need more than just an IDE to create a real application. The fact you can't easily work with files or open up a terminal is a serious deal breaker there.

    And of course there's the fact there's no way to share screen space between different apps on an iPad. The fact every app always takes up the entire screen is great for a lot of people, but I don't think developers are amo

  • Just No (Score:2, Insightful)

    by MogNuts (97512)

    Seriously. Just no. Journalists--stop it. Stop it already.

    I wonder what will happen when all the hype dies down and people actually use their tablet for more than casual BS. Right now it's The New Shiny (TM). But when the world over finally realizes it's collecting dust, will they buy another?

    My guess--only the $200 tablets like the Nexus 7 will survive. Though the only thing that has peaked my interest would be *laptops* or convertible tablets (like that new Sony one with a slide out KB) with Win 8. Becaus

    • Re:Just No (Score:4, Informative)

      by Hognoxious (631665) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @04:07PM (#41207975) Homepage Journal

      > Though the only thing that has peaked my interest

      The word is piqued, you poor benighted heathen.

    • by Tom (822)

      But when the world over finally realizes it's collecting dust, will they buy another?

      Yes.

      Maybe that's because I never used my iPad for any bullshit. I always knew what I wanted it for and that's what I'm using it for. It's a great device for many things while I'm on the road or otherwise not at my desk. If I just want to check if I got new mail, the iPhone will do. When I actually want to process my mail, with replies and all, iPad is great.

      Coding? Please. Be serious. Nobody sane would do that, except for emergencies.

    • Re:Just No (Score:4, Informative)

      by GodfatherofSoul (174979) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @06:45PM (#41209127)

      I got an iPad this semester for school. I take all my notes on it and have all my textbooks on it; including using it as the calendar for my school events. After I got mine, I noticed how many causal computing tasks this device does better than a laptop or cellphone. The latter handle the boundary use cases very well, while the iPad does everything in between well. I could probably live with a dumb phone now, use the iPad as my utility computer, and rely on my laptop for my heavier lifting.

      You might think it's an overhyped gadget (and I did too before I got one), but they're definitely industry changers.

  • No (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Bogtha (906264) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:52PM (#41207831)

    Look, I'm an iOS & web developer. I use an iPad all day long, often off-site. If anybody is the target market for this, it's me. And I think developing on an iPad is an awful idea. It's a case of "just because you can, doesn't mean you should". Is it possible to pull up a code editor on the iPad? Of course. But that doesn't make it a better choice than, well, just about any other option. The only redeeming aspect of this is if you already have an iPad with you, it's better than nothing at all. But really, how often is it that you need to do some coding unexpectedly and you only have your iPad with you? This is what laptops are for.

    • Look, I'm an iOS & web developer. I use an iPad all day long, often off-site. If anybody is the target market for this, it's me. And I think developing on an iPad is an awful idea. It's a case of "just because you can, doesn't mean you should". Is it possible to pull up a code editor on the iPad? Of course. But that doesn't make it a better choice than, well, just about any other option. The only redeeming aspect of this is if you already have an iPad with you, it's better than nothing at all. But really, how often is it that you need to do some coding unexpectedly and you only have your iPad with you? This is what laptops are for.

      I agree 110% the iPad (and Android tablets) are nice for all sorts of things but they won't replace a full fledged desktop anytime soon. The moment I want to do something more complex than take notes with Pages, do some browsing, read a PDF or write short emails; something like say.... work on my computer graphics (Photoshop for iPad is a joke), edit video, do heavy duty word processing (Pages for all it's uses is rather limited on iPad) or god forbid, develop software, I reach for my laptop. My MacBook Air

  • by TeknoHog (164938) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @03:54PM (#41207857) Homepage Journal

    No.

    Next up: "Does Betteridge's law ever work?"

  • Emacs (Score:5, Funny)

    by gentryx (759438) * on Sunday September 02, 2012 @04:05PM (#41207959) Homepage Journal
    Not until there is an Emacs version available from the App Store.
  • nonsense (Score:4, Informative)

    by Tom (822) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @04:09PM (#41207991) Homepage Journal

    I do a lot of PHP coding, so I've been kind of waiting for something like that, thanks for the link.

    That said, there is no way in any of the seven hells that I would do my day-to-day coding on my iPad. Try writing a few thousand characters on it, in a non-linear form, and you'll understand why.

    What I definitely would love is an editor that I can use for some quick fixes or updates while I'm on the road. That way the testers can get crunching already and I might be able to send it live when I get home.

  • Until you can chain apps together so as to get real work done w/o being limited by what an app developer has chosen to do, the iPad is a very limited tool.

    We need AppleScript, support for it in apps, and we need a HyperCard replacement (why not allow Runtime Revolution, the nicest HyperCard clone I know of to run?)

  • I've done a tiny amount of dabbling in Android code and it reminded me of how much I miss Python. It's a shame that a walled-garden setup like iOS is actually friendlier to alternate languages than Android.

  • I've coded on worse (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Dixie_Flatline (5077) <vincent...jan...goh@@@gmail...com> on Sunday September 02, 2012 @04:18PM (#41208061) Homepage

    I love how some of the comments are of the vein, "No way! How can I code without an IDE and a debugger and my 3 massive monitors and 16-core processor? What a joke!" I've coded on the console, in vi or emacs. If people couldn't write software without modern amenities, we'd never have had the modern amenities.

    The reason why we won't be coding on the iPad for quite a while to come is because that's not what Apple wants you to use it for. Light work, maybe, but it's mostly a consumption device, not a creation device. Besides, if you're that hot to code on your iPad, you're a lot better off coding remotely through SSH on a machine with that 16-core processor and 8GB of RAM. (Just because I've worked on those old machines doesn't mean it's the best way to do it. :)

    Maybe one day, when this kind of device is effectively all anyone wants to use. But for now, Apple would rather that you bought more hardware, not less.

    • by JDG1980 (2438906)

      I love how some of the comments are of the vein, "No way! How can I code without an IDE and a debugger and my 3 massive monitors and 16-core processor? What a joke!" I've coded on the console, in vi or emacs. If people couldn't write software without modern amenities, we'd never have had the modern amenities.

      It's not that people absolutely can't code without modern tools and systems, it's that doing so is less productive. Why would you want to deliberately use a less effective system when you don't have t

  • thin-blooded (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Tom (822) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @04:20PM (#41208093) Homepage Journal

    full-blooded software development tool

    Yeah, right.

    I've taken a lot, and I'm underwhelmed.

    No support for git or Subversion, i.e. revision control. Is anyone on this planet seriously still writing software without a revision control system?

    No database, not even sqlite. Every non-trivial PHP application I know uses a database. How do you want to work on it if you can't at least fake DB queries?

    Direct execution instead of webserver emulation. Very few PHP apps are standalone, the vast majority are written for a web environment. Frameworks and libraries do rely on webserver features for parts of their functionality (such as URL rewriting). Another major thing you can't test.

    If they tried selling me this as an IDE for my Mac, I wouldn't even test it even if it were free.

  • by rhysweatherley (193588) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @04:25PM (#41208135)
    Lua, Python, PHP? All scripting languages, useful for their purpose of quick one-off glue tasks, but not anywhere close to "real programming". Call me when you can write a 300,000 line C++ or Java monster on the thing without ending up with debilitating eye or wrist strain injuries.
  • by gman003 (1693318) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @04:38PM (#41208263)

    I can't even get my IDE working on my Mac!

    Seriously. Xcode refuses to install. And I can't seem to find just a plain compiler (like GCC) except the one "included" with Xcode, so I can't use any other IDE either (I'd prefer CodeBlocks, as it's what I use on Windows, and will use on Linux as soon as I find the time to install it).

    It probably has something to do with me being a few versions "behind" and not willing to shell out $$$ for an official developer's license, but guess what? I can install Visual Studio or GCC on my old XP machine and start coding, no license required.

    While the Mac may be a somewhat-attractive option as a desktop, and it even has all the trappings of a good developer's workstation, it downright SUCKS for coding. So I'm not even going to consider coding on their dumbed-down tablet OS until I can get a freaking compiler for their so-called "full-power" desktop OS.

  • Not anytime soon (Score:4, Insightful)

    by sideslash (1865434) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @04:43PM (#41208297)
    My development machine has 24 GB of RAM, an Intel 8 core 3.4 GHz x64 CPU, and the ability to run multiple applications at once on multiple monitors. One of those applications is a virtual machine where I host running copies of other operating systems. I'm accustomed to waiting maybe 5 or 10 seconds for a compile of my current iOS app to complete, which of course is in my virtual Hackintosh, since I chose an OS other than OS X for my main OS. (Relax, I have an official Mac, I just leave it off a lot of the time.)

    So let me get this straight. I can drop down to 1 GB of RAM, and 1 GHz dual core CPU of the ARM architecture, which equates to maybe a 200 MHz x86 or something. I sacrifice freedom of choice of main OS in addition to all my virtualization abilities. I have to stare at one lonely monitor running one lonely app at a time. It will likely take 10 minutes simply to compile small to medium sized apps in Xcode, assuming I have enough memory to compile them.

    Maybe someday? That's the best I can say at this point.
  • Obllig (Score:4, Informative)

    by wbr1 (2538558) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @04:45PM (#41208319)
  • by wonkavader (605434) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @05:15PM (#41208561)

    The iPad is terrible.

    It's really, really bad. I have one. I use it to watch PBS -- the PBS app isn't very good. Crashes now and then, video flips back in time and then catches up confusingly, doesn't provide good search tools. But it's portable, and I can use it in the can.

    I keep trying to do other stuff with the iPad. Everything I try which claims to make the thing do something well turns out to make it do a crappy job of that task.

    Art. SSH. Cheap games. Writing. Note management. Fail, fail, fail, fail, fail.

    It's all really bad. Badly designed. Impossible to copy and paste. Impossible to select text quickly. Pointing at things doesn't work all that well (your finger is big). So you can get a stylus and a bluetooth keyboard, but you're still left with a crappy MODEL. It's not a good system for actually doing anything.

    People keep telling me they love the iPad. That it works for this or that. But I try what they recommend and what the app always does is make the iPad less horrible. But not less horrible enough.

    The iPad is light. It's really portable. But it needs a complete overhaul to do anything well.

    Android ain't fantastic either, but it's realy not as bad as the iPad.

  • by dell623 (2021586) on Sunday September 02, 2012 @09:50PM (#41209995)

    Seriously? Code on an iPad? Why on earth would you want to do that? This tablet fad is getting beyond ridiculous. Is the convenience of holding and carrying of a tablet device so vital that people are willing to trade absolutely everything else for it? This is the age of stupid hybrid OS like Windows 8 coupled to a hybrid device that has a much smaller screen than a standard laptop in a ridiculous 16:9 ratio at a much higher price than a comparably specced laptop just so you can use it as a tablet? Who in their sane mind would want to code on a tablet, I sit here on a 1080p 15.6 screen thinking I really need to pick up a 24"/27" as soon as possible to do real work.
    What will the next trend be? Cooking everything in a tiny saucepan over a tiny camping stove because you can carry it everywhere, and we can mock the chefs with their gigantic pans and woks and ovens, who needs those. Abandoning bicycles for unicycles that fit in a suitcase for portability? Wildlife and sports photography with an iPhone, because who needs those SLRs and gigantic 300mm F2.8 lens? Writing and editing books and articles, manuscripts spanning hundreds of pages with a long list of references to be checked, all written on an iPad, because who the hell needs multiple windows open and visible at the same time on the screen, and as for typing, just blindly poke your fingers and autocorrect will seamlessly convert it to beautifully worded text.

    • by Evil Pete (73279)

      Excellent rant. Agree completely. Each time I see people with an iPad I think they look very nice. But when I pick it up I ask myself, "what will I use it for?" The answer is "nothing". Too heavy for an ereader, can't touch type, screen to small for text editing. Yeah in the past I've coded via terminal windows 80x25, I wouldn't describe it as pleasurable, why should I go back to that? And it's subpowered. Bah. I used to know a guy back in the dos days who actually liked edlin, some people will use anything

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