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Media Programming News

Xiph Episode 2: Digital Show & Tell 50

Posted by Unknown Lamer
from the very-complicated-beeps dept.
An anonymous reader writes "Continuing a firehose tradition of maximum information density, Xiph.Org's second video on digital media explores multiple facets of digital audio signals and how they really behave in the real world. Demonstrations of sampling, quantization, bit-depth, and dither explore digital audio behavior on real audio equipment using both modern digital analysis and vintage analog bench equipment... just in case we can't trust those newfangled digital gizmos. You can also download the source code for each demo and try it all for yourself!" Plus you get to look at Monty's beard and hear his soothing voice. There's a handy wiki page with further information and a summary of the video if text is your thing.
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Xiph Episode 2: Digital Show & Tell

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  • by Mister Liberty (769145) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @02:36PM (#43027327)

    Found it very informative to a non-guru.

    Aside from that, the video and its audio, and I'm not kidding here,
    were very pleasant and sympathetic to the ears and eyes.

  • This is good (Score:4, Informative)

    by ceoyoyo (59147) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @03:19PM (#43027735)

    This guy knows what he's talking about, and communicates it well. Amateur audiophiles should especially read his article here: http://people.xiph.org/~xiphmont/demo/neil-young.html [xiph.org].

  • full props to Monty (Score:5, Informative)

    by nadaou (535365) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @03:31PM (#43027831) Homepage

    ... for all the bullshit Blackboard technology mess, videotaped classroom lectures, and .edu buzzwords, this sort of thing is exactly how open education should be done.

    congrats Monty, once again you've done well.

  • by wonkey_monkey (2592601) on Wednesday February 27, 2013 @06:48PM (#43029375) Homepage
    For a video all about audio, why does the guy's voice keep flapping around from left speaker to right speaker? I found it pretty distracting. Next time, try a clip-on mic and mix it down to mono unless it's necessary to make a point.
    • I intentionally avoid using lavalier mics. Their amplitude and timbre are all over the place depending on the direction you're looking, they pick up clothing noise, and you're either tethered to a wire or have to deal with the complexity and limitations of a wireless system.

      Headsets work better overall, but are highly visible and still add a layer of complexity. They also sound like someone talking directly into your ear. Even with additional postprod [going all the way to room modeling], I've never mana

      • FWIW, several other video producers wrote me to ask how I got such great sound without a lav

        Aside from the stereo thing, it did sound very clear.

        The stereo image was intentional, it's a trick for removing perceived echo/reverb by spreading it out across a stereo image instead of it all piling up right behind the voice in mono.

        You just can't stop teaching people stuff, can you? ;)

        • by xiphmont (80732) *

          I think it's more "I want people to know why I do the stupid things I do." Latent fear of being committed.

      • by iluvcapra (782887)

        The stereo image was intentional, it's a trick for removing perceived echo/reverb by spreading it out across a stereo image instead of it all piling up right behind the voice in mono.

        o_0

        FWIW, several other video producers wrote me to ask how I got such great sound without a lav, and (like you) others wrote to mention that they found the very wide stereo distracting. I'll tinker with it more in the next vid.

        Nobody records dialogue in X-Y stereo professionally, and recording dialogue in any kind of stereo f

        • by xiphmont (80732) *

          >If you insist on recording in stereo though, you might do as they did, and record with a Mid-Side array and use a matrix to decode back to L-R, so you can control the stereo spread in post-production.

          That would not have controlled the reverb; the space this was recorded in was a concrete floor with concrete walls and no acoustic treatment. Like I said, it was a tradeoff, and one that was successful if not perfect.

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