Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Stats IT

23% of IT Workers Spend Thanksgiving With Coworkers 111

Posted by timothy
from the but-the-turkeys-generally-have-titles-in-management dept.
itwbennett writes "A timely CareerBuilder survey finds that 23% of IT pros spend the holiday with coworkers, either in the office or at another location. But the findings vary widely by city. In Boston, for example, you're pretty sure to be on your own for the holiday — only 6% of coworkers there nosh together. While in Atlanta (35%) or Dallas (30%) things are downright chummy."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

23% of IT Workers Spend Thanksgiving With Coworkers

Comments Filter:
  • ...and there won't even be neither turkey nor booze, over here in Europe *g
    • ...and there won't even be neither turkey nor booze, over here in Europe *g

      (emphasis mine) At least, I hope for you there aren't any grammar-Nazis over there...

      • by CaptSlaq (1491233) on Tuesday November 26, 2013 @09:51AM (#45526011)

        ...and there won't even be neither turkey nor booze, over here in Europe *g

        (emphasis mine) At least, I hope for you there aren't any grammar-Nazis over there...

        No, the eurozone has effectively expunged "Nazi" from their vernacular, if the media is to be believed

        Source [go.com]

        Money quote:

        Users were warned not to take bids on Nazi items from people in France, Germany, Austria or Italy because of laws in those countries. Users with French- or German-language Web browsers also were blocked from searching for Nazi-related items, eBay spokesman Kevin Pursglove said

        • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

          by vikingpower (768921)
          Well, you are on to something here. I live and work in a German-language country. As a matter of fact, using the word "nazi" is simply not done here. People cringe if and when I literally translate "grammar Nazi" or "spelling Nazi" into German, even this long after the war. So I use "grammar taliban" or "spelling fundamentalist" instead. That has the strange property of making people smile uncontrollably. Va comprende, Charles...
      • Bonus points for using "nor" with "neither," though...so close and yet so far...

    • by slashmydots (2189826) on Tuesday November 26, 2013 @09:45AM (#45525947)
      If we stole the country from Native Americans through trickery, scamming, and crooked contracts but every square inch of Europe was taken over by bloodthirsty dictators, kings, emperors, etc surely that deserves even more of a holiday, right? Maybe killsgiving or genocide-o-rama.
      • by Anonymous Coward

        Deathsgiving

      • Weasel-stomping day? [youtube.com]
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by plopez (54068)

        You forget that the tradition of invasion, conquest; and economic,religious, and cultural assimilation was a grand old tradition in Eurasia long before the Americsa were discovered. E.g. Alexander the Great, the Romans, and the Vandals to name but a few. Americans learned at Europeans feet.

        • by Capt James McCarthy (860294) on Tuesday November 26, 2013 @11:05AM (#45526737) Journal

          You forget that the tradition of invasion, conquest; and economic,religious, and cultural assimilation was a grand old tradition in Eurasia long before the Americsa were discovered. E.g. Alexander the Great, the Romans, and the Vandals to name but a few. Americans learned at Europeans feet.

          Stop confusing people with historical facts. It's easier to forget the past and blame the present. Really, it's best to blame the present not learning from the past failures.

    • by plopez (54068) on Tuesday November 26, 2013 @10:30AM (#45526327) Journal

      But usually there is some other substitute e.g. Oktoberfest or its equivalent. Just about every culture has some sort of fall harvest festival if they have such a season.

    • UPVOTE PARENT! 90% of the world dont celebrate Thanksgiving.

    • by the_arrow (171557)

      If we in Europe would have "thanksgiving" holidays for each good thing that's worth giving thanks for throughout history, some countries would have holiday around 50 weeks of the year.

      Though to be honest, that seems to be what some countries do anyway, I mean work only two weeks a year (see e.g. Greece).

  • The Rest (Score:5, Funny)

    by Infiniti2000 (1720222) on Tuesday November 26, 2013 @09:32AM (#45525825)
    The remaining 77% spend it in their mom's basement.
    • Re:The Rest (Score:5, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday November 26, 2013 @09:44AM (#45525939)

      Hey, that's not fair! I come upstairs for Thanksgiving.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      The remaining 77% spend it in their mom's basement.

      Probably, fixing the family computers...

      That's my over all, 100%, most hated pet peeve of all time. I can't attend family holidays without someone telling me how slow their computer is, it won't connect to the Internet, is making funny noises, etc., etc. I can visit friends and spend whole evenings not even seeing a computer! But family, oh I' their personal IT Department fro f@#k's sake.

      I think it will come to a head this season.

      • by cayenne8 (626475)

        Probably, fixing the family computers...

        That's my over all, 100%, most hated pet peeve of all time. I can't attend family holidays without someone telling me how slow their computer is, it won't connect to the Internet, is making funny noises, etc., etc. I can visit friends and spend whole evenings not even seeing a computer! But family, oh I' their personal IT Department fro f@#k's sake.

        Say what I say...that "you mostly work with server class computers and operating systems, and you're not that familiar

    • Re:The Rest (Score:5, Funny)

      by plopez (54068) on Tuesday November 26, 2013 @10:35AM (#45526373) Journal

      "Mom! More Hot Pockets!"

  • by TWX (665546) on Tuesday November 26, 2013 @09:46AM (#45525963)
    I wouldn't be surprised if the "23%" figure is fairly close to the percentage of the general populace that spends Thanksgiving with friends instead of with their own family, or of the general populace that spends Thanksgiving with their coworkers, who are also their friends.

    If I lived away from family and couldn't justify the travel to visit them for a meal, and if most of my friends were also coworkers, I'd probably spend time with them, like I'd spend time with the off-work anyway.

    This is no surprise.
    • If I lived away from family and couldn't justify the travel to visit them for a meal, and if most of my friends were also coworkers, I'd probably spend time with them, like I'd spend time with the off-work anyway.

      I would have done that in my twenties, but pushing 40 now (ugh) I want nothing to do with my cow-orkers after hours. I'll go to happy hour with the team so I don't look like an unsocial jerk, but otherwise forget it unless there's a charge code to bill my time to.

  • by BringsApples (3418089) on Tuesday November 26, 2013 @09:47AM (#45525975)
    From the article:

    IT's pro-coworker showing was only 2% less than those put-upon retail workers who may be forced to work right after they finish their plate. The top industry was Transportation and Utilities (28%) and Retail (25%), with IT, Healthcare and Finance tied at 23%.

    • by mattie_p (2512046)
      I'm glad that there is a significant minority doing this. I invited a co-worker over when I found out he had no-where to go. As a recent transplant, we weren't planning on having family over, but Thanksgiving is meant to be shared. I imagine the motives of the other 23% is probably very similar. 23% and proud!
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Really funny story. I was team lead for a small group. I invited everyone over to my house for thanksgiving . We were all young professionals at the time, mostly single. Just as we sat down to eat, the on-call pager went off. Policy was we had 15 minutes to respond. The on-call person waited and called back. "Sorry, just sat down to turkey, please page the backup." For the rest of the meal we repeated going through the on-call list this way, around the table. Sweet :)

  • by sandytaru (1158959) on Tuesday November 26, 2013 @09:50AM (#45526005) Journal
    At least my coworkers will stick to polite and civil conversation for the duration of a meal. Odds are 99 to 1 that someone in my extended family will go off on a long winded political rant and/or racist screed, such that I will try to find an animal or small child to interact with in a quiet corner rather than have to listen to them.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      To be fair, every human being and interaction makes nerds want to sit alone in a corner of the room. Oh look, grandma's M&M bowl is right there, too.

      Was this too vicious? I'm sorry.

    • Odds are 99 to 1 that someone in my extended family will go off on a long winded political rant and/or racist screed

      Maybe the problem is you.

      Really.

      I could imagine the typical Slashdotter inciting that kind of conversation with comments about the invisible sky fairy or slaughtering innocent native americans during a gathering of people who might have different opinions about those subjects.

      Out in the general public, I find social conservatives and the religious to be way more accepting than the smug angry atheist. The irony.

      • "Out in the general public" is absolutely not the same as "sitting around the dinner table" however. Even the most loud and annoying person can be quiet and indifferent on the streets.

        My parents had little political discourse - his family was party machine Republican and she was a labor Democrat, but neither were very involved in politics outside of actually voting. They were more apt to fight over money than they were politics. Yet they were happily married for 39 years, and much of that was because
    • I'll be downstairs beating my nephews in Mario Kart and Cell Damage to avoid those uncomfortable discussions.

  • Mandatory overtime/rotating holidays :/

  • And what's the percentage of those workers that are immigrants or of some religion that doesn't let them celebrate? I know we have a lot of people from India, Russia, and Thailand that all love to get the extra overtime during yet another one of your crazy US holidays. Then we have a few Jehovah Whiteness's that also like this time of year. I bet they account for well over 20% of our staff so how knows.

    Secondly, most of my Turkey eating co-workers ended up having thanksgiving at various relatives houses the

    • by mcgrew (92797) *

      What religions don't let practitioners celebrate Thanksgiving? It isn't a holy day like Hannukah or Easter. What do the JWs have against it?

      And I was in Bhuddist Thailand for a year, I saw no indication that they would be against a holiday like Thanksgiving. After all, they have the "water festival" which gets really wild and crazy. It's a spring holiday marking the beginning of the rainy season and consists of throwing water at each other. Sometimes barrels full. Sometimes there are pretty bad injuries (li

  • Dallas, like many cities of the region are colonized by transient populations from far flung areas. Boston is a city of drunks with large families. Are there any more stereotypes we want to use?

  • Fairest for me (Score:4, Insightful)

    by ToasterTester (95180) on Tuesday November 26, 2013 @11:03AM (#45526713)

    One place I was at we were doing 24/7 support so someone had to always be onsite. For holidays our boss just split the day into 3 hour shifts starting at 6am. For only having to work 3 hours wasn't too painful still got most of the day with family/friends. Boss also said it will be dead bring DVDs to watch, just answer phone if it rings. So pretty painless Holiday work.

    • Our Christmas ~party was the only day we were allowed to drink at work. We put in a couple hours that morning, then played Open Arena, poker, etc. before heading to a local bar afterwards :)

  • X% of people SAID this or that. This is another poll that just measures what people think they should say. In Boston, people feel that they should care more about hard work. In the South, people put more emphasis on family and friends.

  • Thinking of myself I've spent Thanksgiving at work twice because I was traveling overseas and it wasn't practical to fly back for the holiday. It does wonders for perspective through when you encounter people who insist it is a Christian holiday. You then get to explain that there's only two countries on the planet that celebrate it and they don't even celebrate it on the same day. Out of the US the holiday is known for overeating of food and buying too many presents. sigh

    • by xaxa (988988)

      the holiday is known for overeating of food and buying too many presents. sigh

      You could say exactly the same about Christmas in the UK. We even choose turkey!

      There will be more surveys like this [cpo.org.uk] in the next few weeks:
      "Only 10% of adults across the UK think that its religious meaning is the most important thing about Christmas"
      "just 4% of 25-34 year olds compared to 20% of those over 60, gave the religious connotations of Christmas a top rating"
      "86% of those polled agree that Christmas has become too commercialised"

      However, "The YouGov Spending intentions survey for 2013 found that p

  • you guys are great to work with, and I enjoy our D&D games on Sunday afternoons, but I have family to annoy during holidays. You know?

  • The top of the list is probably an intersection of "cities people move to for work" and "cities which have recently developed IT industry," or places where IT workers are less likely to have extended family.
  • I've spent 3 Thanksgivings with co-workers, once with a building manager (senior manager), once with a manager of a different department, and once with an administrative assistant that I am still friends with. It was a small company though (around 2,000 employees) so everyone knew each other pretty well.

    My current employer is a global bank, everyone here just stabs everyone in the back and is extremely defensive about separating their personal life from work.

    I'm just going to stay at home this year, all alo

  • In Boston, for example, you're pretty sure to be on your own for the holiday — only 6% of coworkers there nosh together.

    Ah, well that stinks. Too bad people don't have friends, or family, to spend their holidays with...just coworkers. So, if you're in Boston, you'll probably be alone this Thanksgiving because you don't have friends, you don't have family, and your coworkers hate you.

  • Here in the United States it is coming close to Thanksgiving, a holiday to visit family and be thankful for our many blessings. However corporate culture, as a part of our-business-is-a-family mentality likes to do pot lucks. I will encourage and support anyone that wants to have the pot luck on company time as long as the company does not make me participate. I, like many people, do not regard my co-workers as a "family". I don't feel like investing extra money to feed these people in the name of company-i

  • No one is actually from Dallas, so no family there, and there's nothing to do there but eat and shop anyway.
    • by jodido (1052890)
      I meant no one who works in IT (and not only, but of course lots of people are from Dallas)
  • And while you're all sleepy from excessive turkey consumption, your government will dissolve more of your freedoms into the fettered cranberry sauce-like sludge they call democracy and freedom. don't sleep people, it's a trap. put down the turkey and pick up a meth pipe and an "assault weapon", it's the only way to stay alert during a distraction of this magnitude.

Living on Earth may be expensive, but it includes an annual free trip around the Sun.

Working...