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Wine Software

Fun With Wine 263

taviso writes "Ever wondered what would happen if you could compile and run cygwin under wine ? What about compiling wine under cygwin ? well these guys have, and are planning to nest the two environments as many times as possible to see if wine can take the strain, and not without good reason: 'Having such virtualization environments run within each other is an important milestone in the lives of these projects, it is a remarkable technical feat that requires a great deal of maturity'. "
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Fun With Wine

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  • by QuietRiot ( 16908 ) <cyrus AT 80d DOT org> on Sunday November 17, 2002 @01:09PM (#4691312) Homepage Journal
    What's this, cygwine?
    • Fine Wine and Cygars?
    • Re:What's this? (Score:2, Interesting)

      by jez9999 ( 618189 )
      I've been wondering for a while now; isn't WINE kind of illegal? Why hasn't Microsoft cracked down on it yet? This is no attempt at a troll, BTW, just genuine curiosity.

      I mean, WINE is attempting to perfectly imitate the Windows API. This seems to me like a breach of copyright. Microsoft create an API and its functionality is copied identically by another application? It actually seems like MS have a genuine case, for once, at legal action. Looks like WINE is doing to Microsoft what Microsoft have done to a lot of competitiors - steal their intellectual property.
  • Wonderful. (Score:3, Insightful)

    by aussersterne ( 212916 ) on Sunday November 17, 2002 @01:12PM (#4691330) Homepage
    So I can nest to infinite levels cygwin and the free version of Wine, giving me access to the Linux commands I already have in Linux, only now I have them available to me n+1 times at progressively "deeper" levels. I can dig arbitrarily deep in nested environments and run 'ls'. Huzzah!

    But I still cannot run MS Office or Internet Explorer or most games in Wine. D'oh!
    • Re:Wonderful. (Score:5, Informative)

      by xanadu-xtroot.com ( 450073 ) <xanadu AT inorbit DOT com> on Sunday November 17, 2002 @01:34PM (#4691462) Homepage Journal
      But I still cannot run MS Office or Internet Explorer

      What are you talking about? Of course you can [codeweavers.com]
    • Re:Wonderful. (Score:5, Informative)

      by brunes69 ( 86786 ) <{slashdot} {at} {keirstead.org}> on Sunday November 17, 2002 @01:40PM (#4691490) Homepage

      MS Office and IE both run fine in Wine. IE of course only runs if you have an existing Windows install. And all the games I care about (like Warcraft III and Max Payne :P) work fine in WineX

      • MS Office and IE both run fine in Wine. IE of course only runs if you have an existing Windows install.

        Untrue also :) Jeez, looks like half of slashdot hasn't actually used Wine. I have IE6 running at work just fine, although I do have a dual boot system CrossOver isn't using anything from my XP installation. You just need to get the installer and install it as normal. Doesn't work perfectly, but it's good enough for web development which is all I need it for.

      • Re:Wonderful. (Score:5, Interesting)

        by aussersterne ( 212916 ) on Sunday November 17, 2002 @01:48PM (#4691535) Homepage
        I don't know which version of wine you use. But I have downloaded every Wine release, compiled, installed, and run it. I want Wine to work. I read the Wine Weekly News. It would be nice to be able to abandon Win4Lin's "windows in a window" environment in favor of individual application windows.

        But I can still not get the Office installer or the Inernet Explorer installer or the Photoshop installer to run.

        I've even tried several times using Wine with the filesystem created by Win4Lin, which had an "already existing Windows install" containing Office and IE and PS. No dice.

        Here and there (mostly on /.) I hear of people who are able to use Wine to run every last Windows application under the sun. "Wine works great, and it works great now!" they say. But I can't get most any application installers to work with Wine, even with the latest releases. And no Web sites out there exist that give any hints, beyond DLL games that also don't produce desired results.

        If you have nice, step-by-step instructions for getting Office 2000 and Internet Explorer 6 and Photoshop 6 to install and run in Wine, please post them here! The Linux community will be very grateful, as this would allow a large number of people to migrate to Linux by using Wine to run their important applications.

        Yes, you can buy Crossover Office for some increased (yet still limited) application support. And you can buy into the Transgaming situation for some increased (yet still limited) gaming support. And you could even buy WordPerfect Office 2000 for Linux for a while, which used wine for some increased (yet still limited) application support. But that's a lot of $$, a lot of different installations of wine on a single system, and still no Photoshop 6!
        • Re:Wonderful. (Score:2, Informative)

          Yes, you can buy Crossover Office for some increased (yet still limited) application support.
          ...and still no Photoshop 6!
          Like this [slack.net]? or this [slack.net]?
          As you can see from those screenshots, I've had success getting PS 6.0 to work from within Codeweaver's "Crossover Office". It starts & runs without issue. I also tried a few different filters, and they worked.

          However, every time I attempted to modify the default user colors, it crashed without hesitation.
          YMMV.
        • I'm the same way as you. Wine works half-assed no matter what I do. It has always played Solitare, but that's about it. Even when I got Office 2k installed, half the time it would crash as soon as you tried to open a menu. It was never usable.

          I also tried the codweavers plugin demo(for WMP, Quicktime etc.) That didn't go well at all on a stock Redhat 7.3 install. Quicktime kinda worked once in a while, but nothing else would install. They would download via the shell script and then nothing.

          Bottom line is Wine is a crutch and a bad one at that. I'm hardly inexperienced with linux and if I think Wis a pain, I can hardly imagine what less experienced users must go through trying to get it to work.

          BTW even when following the tips on Franks wine world the apps dont' work. I don't know what mojo he uses, but when I've followed the tips I haven't gotten fully usuable apps.
    • by boy_of_the_hash ( 622182 ) on Sunday November 17, 2002 @01:49PM (#4691540)
      Look on the bright side.

      At last a perverse heterogeneous enviroment exists that allows developers to draw on the combined flaws and incompatabilities of linux, windows, cygwin and wine. Which (aside from the uber-cool element), is a boon for masochistic developers everywhere. Perhaps this will spur a new breed of coders that are the cyber-culture equivilent of flagellation cults.

      Then again, I probably should go a little easier on the wine.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday November 17, 2002 @01:13PM (#4691337)
    Imagine parents checking the browser history and discovering their 14-years-old read a page called "Fun With Wine".
    • Imagine parents checking the browser history and discovering their 14-years-old read a page called "Fun With Wine".

      Knowing parents they'll stop the kids using the computer. Knowing kid's, (s)he'll whine.

      *groan*
  • by JessLeah ( 625838 ) on Sunday November 17, 2002 @01:14PM (#4691345)
    Wine has come light-years since I first used it, years and years ago... yet every time I try to use it to run some arbitrary WinThing, inevitably I can't figure out how to make it work, or I try feeding it every DLL/etc. it needs, and then it segfaults. Or just doesn't work.

    I read these stories of people doing absolutely astonishing things using WINE, but what the rest of us (who only have a need to touch WINE when there is something that they Must Have that isn't available for Linux-- in my case, it was the FightAIDS@Home distributed-computing client) really need is a good, central repository of "How to get Program X to work under WINE" mini-tutorials.

    Anyone here work on WineHQ and can comment on this?
    • try winesetup (Score:5, Informative)

      by leehwtsohg ( 618675 ) on Sunday November 17, 2002 @01:40PM (#4691488)
      I had the same problem, sometime I would manage to get something running, mostly not.
      Now the standard (unstable) debian install comes with winesetup, which sets up a nice working wine installation (works a bit better of you have windows installed)
      Try to install winesetup (a contribution from codeweavers)...
    • Anyone here work on WineHQ and can comment on this?

      Actually the WineHQ site is being redesigned at the moment (I'm not a major contributor but am on the lists).

      The best tip for using wine is simply - buy it. WineHQ wine hasn't had much effort put into end user usability, it's much like the raw Linux kernel, it needs wrapping up with lots of utilities and quite a few "hack patches" for it to do everything the users demand. I have 2 installations of Wine on my machine, CrossOver and Wine CVS. Guess which works better.

      Often, a few little things can make a program work better if it doesn't work properly with a standard CodeWeavers install. For instance: WinZip works fine until you open a zip with a message in it. Why? Because it's missing a RichEdit control (wine has no replacement for it yet). You could fiddle with config files and make it use a native riched40.dll, but an easier way is to google for it, find allerasoft.com and download it from there. Run the RichEdit update .exe in Wine, and now you have the control and WinZip works perfectly.

      The Apps DB is the best place to look for tips like this, each app that is known about in the database has a score and a comments section for users to swap tips.

    • I read these stories of people doing absolutely astonishing things using WINE, but what the rest of us (who only have a need to touch WINE when there is something that they Must Have that isn't available for Linux-- in my case, it was the FightAIDS@Home distributed-computing client) really need is a good, central repository of "How to get Program X to work under WINE" mini-tutorials.

      A single guide for each and every program would be impossible to keep updated. Like most people, I have never heard of most Windows programs including the one that you mentioned above.

      The next best thing is the Wine Application Database [codeweavers.com]. The appdb lists specific programs and you can add yours to it so others know how well or poorly the programs you are interested in work.

      Tip: If you search for the message that appears when the program fails to run, you might get directions on how to install another program that is similar and does work with Wine. (Then again, you might not...can't say!)

      The Wine FAQ [www.dssd.ca] has been updated reciently, and the Wine Knowledgebase [winehq.org] is still helpful.

      Note: The Wine-FAQ link listed above may move.

    • by acm ( 107375 ) on Sunday November 17, 2002 @02:25PM (#4691730) Homepage
      I read these stories of people doing absolutely astonishing things using WINE, but what the rest of us (who only have a need to touch WINE when there is something that they Must Have that isn't available for Linux-- in my case, it was the FightAIDS@Home distributed-computing client) really need is a good, central repository of "How to get Program X to work under WINE" mini-tutorials.

      I was interested in your FightAIDS@Home cause, and looked up their website [fightaidsathome.com], but was really turned off by this excerpt of their webpage:

      Entropia, a for-profit corporation, believes in "profit with a purpose". Like oxygen, profit is necessary to survive and grow, but it is not the reason for existence. Occasionally, Entropia's software will run commercial tasks on your computer, which in turn allows us to support this and other non-profit causes, like FightAIDSatHome. Entropia will continue to invest significantly in human and technological resources to drive the science of distributed computing toward ever-greater knowledge, understanding, and exploration of science, technology, and the arts.

      What exactly is included in "commercial tasks." It seems to me that if I'm donating *my* spare computer cycles, and *my* electricity, you shouldn't take advantage of that by profiting from it. Oh well...

    • > Wine has come light-years since I first used it

      LOL. . .I still remember the days when the only program that worked reliably under Wine was notepad and I had fun running exceed on a windows machine, smb mounting its filesystem and then xhosting notepad back on to itself :).

      Wine is not perfect, but it has come a light-years and frankly amazes me how much it can do!
  • No... (Score:3, Insightful)

    by mumblestheclown ( 569987 ) on Sunday November 17, 2002 @01:20PM (#4691369)

    'Having such virtualization environments run within each other is an important milestone in the lives of these projects, it is a remarkable technical feat that requires a great deal of maturity'.

    No, it's a party trick. Milestones include running actual applications that matter and getting large numnbers of users to use the emulators as a bridge from one OS to anther.

    FWIF, Since 1995-1996 or so I've had linux people telling me about how wine is close to obsoleting my windows systems. Hence, my skepticism. These emulators always seem to be amazing technical accomplishments, yes, but like Soviet televisions made of vaccuum tubes for sale at Best Buy, not ready for prime time by anybody but tinkerers. The problem is exacerbated by the fact that they are chasing a moving target..

    • Re:No... (Score:2, Redundant)

      by glwtta ( 532858 )
      These emulators always seem to be amazing technical accomplishments

      Just to start the pedantry rolling - WINE isn't an emulator, it's an API implementation.

      • An emulator is something that duplicates the environment that an application runs in.

        That's from the Wine FAQ. It goes on to say that Wine doesn't attempt to duplicate the environment.

        However, the simple fact of the matter is that I have a shit load of wine libraries on my computer designed specifically to emulate their windows counterparts. As such, WINE most certainly is an emulator.

        Dinivin
        • specifically to emulate their windows counterparts

          The word you are looking for is "duplicate" not "emulate", both in everyday English and in computer terms. The latter is more specific in that "emulation" usually applies to hardware (GNU/Linux and Windows run on the same platforms in this case, there is nothing to emulate)

          Anyway, it seems this is already "redundant", I am not sure what you are trying to prove. Is the WINE team mistaking in that they are not building an emulator? Do you, in fact, know better?

      • How did this get Score: 3 and no moderation type, i.e. no Insightful, Interesting, Underrated... it's just "Score: 3" slashcode bug here?
    • Re:No... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Ed Avis ( 5917 ) <ed@membled.com> on Sunday November 17, 2002 @01:31PM (#4691441) Homepage
      If you have a Windows box, this is an important step forward in the quest to Run Everything Under Cygwin. You can try out your existing apps to see if they work under Wine. If eventually you manage to get all your applications working on top of Cygwin (including some or fewer through Wine), then you can yank away the bottom two layers and switch to a Unixlike OS.
    • Re:No... (Score:2, Informative)

      by John Ineson ( 538704 )
      The problem is exacerbated by the fact that they are chasing a moving target..
      Nope.

      "By the way, a lot of people think that the Windows API is too much of a moving target for WINE to catch up. As a Windows developer, let me say, this is rubbish. Almost every Windows app out there is tested on Win 95 to make sure it runs decently on the entire 32 bit Windows product line. If WINE could ever catch up to Win 95, they would be almost completely done. The target hasn't moved anywhere since August, 1995." -- Joel Spolsky [hethmon.com]

      • I think he's wrong. There's plenty of Windows software that doesn't work on Windows 95 these days, especially if it doesn't have things like IE5 on it.
    • Re:No... (Score:2, Funny)

      by bigdavex ( 155746 )

      No, it's a party trick.

      All of slashdot wants to know -- Are there girls at these parties?

    • FWIF, Since 1995-1996 or so I've had linux people telling me about how wine is close to obsoleting my windows systems. Hence, my skepticism.

      The problem is that Windows is a moving target. I'm sure you can run the apps from 1995-1996 pretty perfectly, but the problem is to always support the latest and greatest stuff from MS.

    • Soviet televisions made of vaccuum tubes

      My word! Do they have screens too?
  • This seems more like a "proof of concept" situation than something that's really important. I understand that it shows a relatively clean program, but when would something like this be necessary or applicable in the real world (ie - repetitively nesting cygwin and wine)?
    • >but when would something like this be necessary
      >or applicable in the real world (ie >repetitively nesting cygwin and wine)?.

      If you have to ask, you are missing the point.
      • >If you have to ask, you are missing the point.

        I asked, so therefore I AM missing the point. The reason I asked was to be enlightened. Does this have a real-world application? Or is it just a simple, "Hey, look what we can do!" sort of thing? If it's the latter, I get it. If the former, then I don't.
  • by 26199 ( 577806 ) on Sunday November 17, 2002 @01:21PM (#4691376) Homepage
    ...from the page:

    Compile & run Cygwin under Wine in Linux

    This provides an a good test case for Wine. It is tough, but we do have the Cygwin source code, and we have a good chance to understand why it does not work.

    So they have a good chance of understanding why it doesn't work?

    Forgive me if I don't find that *overly* impressive :-)

  • Wow (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Apreche ( 239272 ) on Sunday November 17, 2002 @01:26PM (#4691401) Homepage Journal
    these guys have some skills. I know it's probably just because I don't know how, but I can't even get X to work with cygwin, or anyting other than solitaire to work in wine.
    This reminds me of the time when I sshed to one machine, then telneted back to the machine I was on, and kept on telneting and sshing to as many machines as I could to see what would happen. Th results weren't as exciting but it was still fun.
    • Heh. You have a strange idea of a fun Friday night. :)
    • I guess that wasn't recent. I have had X working under Cygwin from even before they had the installer integrated. Nowadays, it is easier. With wine, it is just a matter of fiddling, or spending money on WineX or something.
  • Try this (Score:3, Funny)

    by mfos.org ( 471768 ) on Sunday November 17, 2002 @01:27PM (#4691406)
    Run VTI (A TI calculator emulator) [ticalc.org] under Wine [winehq.com]. Then in VTI, run Tezxas (A ZX Spectrum emulator) [ticalc.org]
  • by Jack William Bell ( 84469 ) on Sunday November 17, 2002 @01:43PM (#4691504) Homepage Journal
    So, is my attempt to use my /. journal as a weblog kinda the same thing? I wonder if someone could use the comment section in one of my entries as a mini-/. ? Then someone could use the comments to that for a weblog and...

    I gotta stop now. My head hurts.

    Jack William Bell
  • So...can I use my Mac to run VirtualPC, run Linux on it, and use WINE and Cygwin to run and develop Windows apps?
  • Great! (Score:5, Funny)

    by flikx ( 191915 ) on Sunday November 17, 2002 @01:45PM (#4691516) Homepage Journal
    A new level for my evil pile!

    Windows -> VMWare -> Linux -> Wine -> Cygwin -> Wine.

    And finally, a stable, enterprise-ready solution for running my Windows applications.

  • I've done this and tests like it under various emulations of systems, yes mostly because I was bored and it is definately useless. What ever happened to geeks who tried to do difficult things... just to see if they could and to hell with practical purpose?
  • World's best honeypot!
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Virtual PC [apple.com] emulates a PC perfectly, so that you can run windows 2000 or a linux distro on it just as though it were a PC.

    I say, run The Sims under WINE under CYGWIN under WINE under {Linux Distro} under Virtual PC under Mac Os 9 environment under Mac OS X.

    And not pay Microsoft a penny.
  • by Doomrat ( 615771 ) on Sunday November 17, 2002 @01:54PM (#4691569) Homepage
    How about installing Linux on an XBox, running Bochs on it, installing Linux onto the Bochs machine, running Virtual PC under Wine, installing Windows 98 on Virtual PC, running WinUae on it, installing Linux onto the emulated Amiga, running Bochs on the emulated Amiga...

    OR you could go out and have sex with a woman, one with breasts and everything.
  • I know this may be a bit offtopic, however I've been trying to find out if wine is usable under osx. Has anyone done this or know of any sites covering this? I've tried google without any luck. Thanks
    • Wine is not usable on a Mac, and probably won't be for a very very long time. I believe that it was a lot of work just to get Winelib working on Linux PPC (ie so you can recompile windows apps if you have the source on linux/ppc), mainly because Wine does funky stuff with assembler, various low level things and so on. If you're on a Mac, you'll have to use Virtual PC to run Windows apps, and buy a copy of Windows.
    • Re:wine on osx (Score:4, Informative)

      by taviso ( 566920 ) on Sunday November 17, 2002 @02:24PM (#4691725) Homepage
      yes and no, wine provides low-level binary compatibility, not hardware emulation, so its only for OSes running on x86 chips.

      winelib [winehq.org], however, is aiming for cross-platform compatability, so its possible you can compile windows software and link it with winelib for use on osx.
  • One day... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by fade ( 4063 ) on Sunday November 17, 2002 @02:01PM (#4691606) Homepage
    This kind of virtualisation stress test is interesting, but largely academic. I'm still waiting for the day when it is less hassle to load the (very few) windows applications I need under wine than it is to reboot my workstation to deal with those tasks under windows. Screwing around with wine to get it to load even small windows applications is one of the most frustrating things I can think of in association with *nix systems. I hear good things about the transgaming stuff, but it obviously hasn't made it back into the main branch of the wine tree. The promise of wine has been hanging out there for a lot of years now; I'm just wondering if perhaps they're trying to build a glass house on quicksand.
  • by defile ( 1059 )

    If you can nest the environments ten times, what is to be gained (scientifically) by doing it one thousand times?

    • Re:Why? (Score:3, Informative)

      by kscguru ( 551278 )
      • Optimization - a 10% slowdown will be magnified exponentially, and thus will be easier to find (and replicate)
      • Reliability - remember how everyone (er... competent admins) load-tests servers so that they could handle a Slashdot-effect load? Theoretically, someone could have an interest in running many, many concurrent applications under Wine - what better way to flush out the bugs in the system than to give it an extreme load?
      • Extensibility - a well-designed system will degrade gracefully under extreme loads. If it doesn't (i.e. it degrades exponentially), then the code probably needs to be reworked to be more efficient.

      But things like this typically follow a scale:
      1) does it work period? (i.e. can cygwin run under wine - 1 nesting)
      2) does it work in the small-number case (i.e. 2-5 nestings, or thereabout)
      3) does it work in the extreme case? (i.e. 10^(2-5) nestings) - which means that most inefficiency bugs are flushed out and the design scales well

      Just about every system can fit into one of these categories - but only the most robust fit into #3. Example: Linux threading. Right now it passes 1 (you can multithread), passes 2 (having a number of threads/process under ~100 doesn't really change performance), but fails 3 (the 2.5 kernel developers are working on that one right now - but ~10,000 kernel threads will bring the system to its knees).

  • by weird mehgny ( 549321 ) on Sunday November 17, 2002 @02:07PM (#4691634)
    ...finally something (other than Doom 3) that gives us a use for the 3 GHz P4.
  • Wine q&a (Score:5, Informative)

    by IamTheRealMike ( 537420 ) on Sunday November 17, 2002 @02:32PM (#4691776)
    I see a lot of posts saying how Wine never works for them etc, how Wine will never catch up with Microsoft and so on. I'd like to dispel a few myths I see.

    The first one is that Wine is hard to make work. Well, it's like Linux you know, if you go get a release from WineHQ it's like getting Debian or Gentoo, great for power users but it requires quite a lot of effort to make it work well. It's all there though, you can sit down and beat WineHQ releases into running Office or IE. It just takes effort and skill.

    For the rest of us, companies like CodeWeavers are for Wine what RedHat is for Linux. They add bits, integrate it nicely, give you support. As a concrete example of what they add, they have a nice app (officesetup) which presents you with a list of apps that are installed a la "Add/Remove programs". If you use this program to install an app as opposed to running the setup.exe directly, icons will be added to your menus and desktop, and file associations will be automatically setup for you. Wine doesn't have this (yet).

    Another thing is that WineHQ has no code for automatically performing a "reboot". Stuff like IE needs some actions to be performed when you reboot the machine (the RunOnce sections). WineHQ releases don't have any code for this, so you'd have to manually read the registry entries and files and do it yourself, hence the fact that most people fail.

    WineHQ will get this code. One of the targets for Wine 1.0 is that it's easy to use. For now though, you need to buy CrossOver Office for the best overall Wine experience. It's unfortunate that you have to buy a separate product for games, but that's one of the perils of BSD licensing, it allows forks like that (fyi wine is now lgpl).

    Another myth is that wine can never catch up with Microsoft. That actually isn't true, if anything we're moving as fast as, if not faster than Microsoft right now. There are a few large projects left and then Wine basically has a mostly complete implementation of the Windows APIs. Such projects include a richedit control (effectively a mini word processor), RPC (being worked on now), DirectX (an lgpl implementation, parts are available but d3d is only like 10% done), a WinHelp app and so on. After that, it's pure bugfixing all the way.

    So what are Microsoft doing? Well they're working on .NET of course, the Windows APIs are horrible and .NET is a way of making them easier to use. But we have that covered as well with Mono, in fact for System.Windows.Forms Mono is using the Wine controls library. Mono is moving at an astonishing pace, it has lots of volunteers working on it. But it needs more developers as always (wine that is), and one problem is that getting Wine working well enough to hack on it is hard. Catch 22 in a way. Don't be put off though. Wine is cool, and remarkably advanced.

    • Ehm, Crossover developers actually support the license switch to LGPL.. it's Transgaming folks that have problems with it and encourage dual-licensing, because some of their changes involve propietary bits that cannot be revealed.

      Nothing stopping anyone from putting a propietary pay-only interface on top of an LGPL product.
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Would it be of any significant speed benefit to build an engine to recompile software to run in linux native code, rather than "wineulating" (for lack of a better word, since wine is not an emulator) windows native code in real-time?
  • I'd really like to see this.
  • in cygwin under wine?? :)
  • I have cygwin installed on my AMD box, its nice, but its not what I would call speedy. Vmware running mandrake (with vmware tools, so I can cut and paste) runs at a very acceptable speed. Not saying cygwin doesnt have its uses, working on any text log files is easier with text-utils than plain windows install anyday. (sort/cut/grep/wc/ or perl)

    On the topic of WINE thou, the only reason I use wine is for CounterStrike, and All-seeing-eye on linux.
  • ...requires a great deal of maturity

    I don't know about you guys, but purposefully playing with something until it breaks is not usually considered "mature" in my book.
  • by truth_revealed ( 593493 ) on Sunday November 17, 2002 @05:43PM (#4692802)
    The LINE Project [sourceforge.net] also falls into this ubercool camp. (Is Sourceforge down? Here's the cached version [google.com]). It allows you to run staticly (statically?) linked Linux applications under Windows/Cygwin - including advanced X11 applications. I've tried it and it actually works surprisingly well. The problem is that LINE emulator is not actively maintained any longer and it broke with the recent Cygwin DLL and/or the upgrade to the recent GCC 3.2.x compiler for Cygwin. When I get a chance I'm going to take a look at it to see if there's an easy fix. If anyone here has a clue as to what the problem might be, please reply to this post. thanks.
  • If you put cygwin under wine under cygwin under wine too many times, and it starts to process incohently, would that effect be caused by the fact that the computer is drunk?

[Crash programs] fail because they are based on the theory that, with nine women pregnant, you can get a baby a month. -- Wernher von Braun

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