Catch up on stories from the past week (and beyond) at the Slashdot story archive

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Oracle Java Open Source Programming Apache

Will Oracle Surrender NetBeans to Apache? (infoworld.com) 69

An anonymous Slashdot reader quotes InfoWorld: Venerable open source Java IDE NetBeans would move from Oracle's jurisdiction to the Apache Software Foundation under a proposal... endorsed by Java founder James Gosling, a longtime fan of the IDE. Moving NetBeans to a neutral venue like Apache, with its strong governance model, would help the project attract more contributions from various organizations, according to the proposal posted in the Apache wiki.

"Large companies are using NetBeans as an application framework to build internal or commercial applications and are much more likely to contribute to it once it moves to neutral Apache ground," the proposal says. While Oracle will relinquish its control over NetBeans under the proposal, individual contributors from Oracle are expected to continue contributing to the project.

On Facebook, Gosling posted the proposal meant "folks like me can more easily contribute to our favorite IDE. The finest IDE in existence will be getting even better, faster!" InfoWorld reports that when aked if Oracle had neglected NetBeans, Gosling said, "Oracle didn't single out NetBeans for neglect, they neglect everything... I'm thrilled that the NetBeans community will now be able to chart its own course."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Will Oracle Surrender NetBeans to Apache?

Comments Filter:
  • For one, this is a proposal to the Apache foundation to take it onto. There is no indication that Oracle has any say in it.

    For second "CDDL + GPL v2 with Classpath Exception. Upon entering Apache, the NetBeans license will be migrated to the current Apache License." Not sure how it is possible to 'migrate' GPLv2 code to Apache since the license is incompatible.

    • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday September 18, 2016 @08:15PM (#52914269)

      I'm sure all commits to Sun and Oracle required copyright assignments, so it's trivial for Oracle to relicense.

    • For one, this is a proposal to the Apache foundation to take it onto. There is no indication that Oracle has any say in it.

      That is a naive statement.

      Oracle owns Sun's intellectual property, which includes Java and Netbeans. Netbeans was under some form of Sun license (GPLish?) before Sun was bought out by Oracle. For the Apache foundation to adopt Netbeans, Netbeans code would have to be forked out of Oracle's repository.

      "Hostile takeover" is an invalid term when referred to forking. The question is whether Oracle will challenge the fork. Even if Oracle could lose in court over whether Netbeans "could" fork, it takes money

  • NetBeans 6.8 actually had good vi bindings!
  • by Dan East ( 318230 ) on Sunday September 18, 2016 @07:10PM (#52914013) Homepage Journal

    Will Oracle Surrender NetBeans to Apache?

    Why is this posed as a question? The articles say Oracle has already turned it over to Apache.

    Also, when I see stuff like this:

    The finest IDE in existence

    My attention immediately shuts off any I have no respect for what that person is saying. Sounds like marketing drivel.

    • The finest IDE in existence

      My attention immediately shuts off any I have no respect for what that person is saying. Sounds like marketing drivel.

      So you have no respect for James Gosling - the creator of Java?

      • I certainly don't. It played a large part in cementing a culture where programmers learn to hate having to learn advanced parts of a programming language, and then, due to their own limitations and fear of learning, decide it's better to create yet another program language that has its own set of problems that either their parent language had solved in advanced features, or they reinvent the car crash from another language.
        • by DrXym ( 126579 )
          Ah right. Java was invented through a fear of learning and developer incompetence. It couldn't possibly be because C and C++ have very obvious shortcomings that some people have a desire to solve while still preserving as much of what they like about it.

          And clearly since Java has become the bedrock of enterprise development they clearly got something right.

          • by Anonymous Coward

            >And clearly since Java has become the bedrock of enterprise development they clearly got something right.

            So... you're saying that Java is our generation's COBALT?

            • by DrXym ( 126579 )
              COBALT? Even assuming you meant COBOL, the answer is no. You're putting words into my mouth.
          • Yes, it was invented through a fear of learning and incompetence. It's literally designed to handhold the developer and limit the features that are useful, like multiple inheritance and operator overloading. And it certainly didn't (and I would argue, still doesn't) handle resource cleanup especially well - it's not just about freeing memory safely and reliably, which C++ does better than Java, even before smart pointers, but also other resources like locks, instead of relying on the programmer to remember
    • My attention immediately shuts off any I have no respect for what that person is saying. Sounds like marketing drivel.

      They are expressing an opinion, no different from saying "Linux/OSX/Windows is the best thing ever!" - nothing wrong with being excited about your favourite tool, I think, even if others have a different perspective on things.

      Here's my experiences with the beast: I have, since the early days of Linux (kernel 0.9 installed wirh a huge pile of floppies) been a terminal+vi+make kind of guy; I never really liked GUI based IDEs and was not too keen on the fullscreen IDEs of the DOS era either. As everybody else

  • by Kobun ( 668169 ) on Sunday September 18, 2016 @07:11PM (#52914017)
    Since Netbeans doesn't have an off-shoot project caused by Oracle's famous Neglect(tm), this seems like it ought to be more successful than the OO.org fiasco. Maybe?
    • I certainly hope so since I've been using Netbeans for many years and I really like it. However, it looks to me that when Oracle donates some project to someone else they just want to stop investing in it, and something the size of Netbeans I don't think will get very far without a corporate sponsor
  • Were there possibly a paid installed base that Oracle had/could buy, so they could say "we have your quivering, twitching, small-mammal-terrified asshole over a barrel, surrender or die", they might possibly give a marginal fuck; otherwise, no, no, not so much. Surrender or die. It's the Oracle way.
  • Caveat: For me anyway :)

    Every time I'm forced to use Eclipse (lot of embedded dev environments require it) I end up wanting to poke my eyes out with a stick.

    • I too hate that Eclipse seems to be the de-facto standard. For me, if it doesn't overrun its memory limits (which I have set to 1G), it freezes, crashes, refuses to save files, and otherwise can be best described as acting like a child.
      Me: Save the file
      Eclipse: I don't wanna
      Me: Save the bloody file
      Eclipse: No, and now I'm not going to talk to you
      Me: Go to timeout (pkill -9 java)
      ...wait 3 min...
      Me: Ready to save the file?
      Eclipse: Save the file? Why didn't you say so earlier? I love saving files!
      (fa
  • by Anonymous Coward

    Netbeans is still doing surprisingly well, and is one of the few projects *not* neglected by Oracle. I've yet to see a single project magically take off when migrating to Apache.

    • I can't even register a new account on netbeans website to report bugs. Even the "contact the webmaster" link is broken.

  • or get rid of?
  • I've used Forte for Java, and then Netbeans. On-premise contracts with various customer sometimes require Eclipse, using which feels like a herd of rodents nibbling at my brain. To me (caveat: this is an opinion based upon 17+ years of experience, not a fact) Netbeans is, indeed, superior to any other IDE in existence, except for emacs if used properly.

    What I admire in Netbeans is the ergonomic look-and-feel. It always seems as if the tool or feature you're looking for is right at hand, or at the most 2 mo

    • I don't know if it's just me but I find Eclipse very cumbersome and unintuitive compared to Netbeans. In Netbeans things seem to be in logical places in Eclipse they're usually where I wouldn't normally look for them.
  • Or will they circle the wagons?

FORTUNE'S FUN FACTS TO KNOW AND TELL: A black panther is really a leopard that has a solid black coat rather then a spotted one.

Working...