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In Oracle's Cloud Pitch To Enterprises, an Echo of a Bygone Tech Era (siliconangle.com) 55

An anonymous reader writes: Oracle sought to position itself once again this week as the best place for everything companies need to move to cloud computing. On Thursday, executives at the database and business software giant distanced Oracle from public cloud leaders such as Amazon Web Services, Google Cloud Platform and Microsoft Azure that provide computing, storage and other services to corporations looking to reduce or eliminate their data centers. "Our cloud is more comprehensive than any other cloud in the market today, a full end-to-end cloud," said David Donatelli, Oracle's executive vice president of converged infrastructure. "We design from the chip all the way up to the application, fully vertically integrated." What's interesting about that messaging, which Oracle has been refining since at least its OpenWorld conference last September, is not simply the competitive positioning. Oracle is essentially saying that the nature of cloud computing suggests customers need to move away from the notion that has dominated information technology since personal computers and PC-based servers began to displace mainframes and minicomputers: cherry-picking the best applications and hardware and cobbling together their own IT setups. In short, Oracle contends, it's time for another broad swing back to the integrated, uber-suppliers of a bygone era of technology. Of course, the new tech titans such as Google, Facebook and Amazon arguably wield as much power in their particular domains of advertising and e-commerce as the Big Blue of old. But it has been a long time since a soup-to-nuts approach has worked for enterprise tech companies, and for those few still attempting it, such as Dell and Oracle, it's far from obvious it will work. The cloud, Oracle contends, may well change that.
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In Oracle's Cloud Pitch To Enterprises, an Echo of a Bygone Tech Era

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  • Don't hang around, baby, two's a crowd.

  • My cloud is bigger than your cloud
  • by xxxJonBoyxxx ( 565205 ) on Friday May 05, 2017 @04:28PM (#54363593)
    >> it has been a long time since a soup-to-nuts approach has worked for enterprise tech companies

    If you were subject to as many sales pitches from large vendors as I am, you would know that Amazon, Google, IBM and Oracle all offer "full stack" PaaS services including table-based DBs, nosql DBs, ESBs/queuing, application runtime environments, etc. In fact, the term "Cloud 3.0" is being used by a bunch of them to describe their soup-to-nuts PaaS solution.
    • Integration is most costly than the original implementation so pre-integrations are key. I just set up 2 Oracle Cloud SaaS instances with a local database. I've never had enough access with PaaS so this hybrid approach offers the best of both worlds.

  • by gweihir ( 88907 )

    I see they are at least bullshit-compatible. My advice to anybody even considering to take that offering is to think long and hard about why you hate Oracle and then the process of thinking about whether you want to buy anything from them ever again will be short indeed.

    • by Anonymous Coward

      The problem with Oracle is this: any business they intend to stay in, they are competitive and state of the art. You can absolutely use them, hand in hand, as you pay them for goods and or service, and you yourself profit on the results of those.

      But the MOMENT they decide that that particular corner of the industry is not aligned with their future, they will shit all of your head and rub it in your mouth. They will deploy new license fees for your deployed software / hardware, often of a comically large a

  • I cringe because I know I'm about to feel like a $20 whore: sore in the ass.
  • by Gravis Zero ( 934156 ) on Friday May 05, 2017 @05:09PM (#54363821)

    "We design from the chip all the way up to the application, fully vertically integrated."

    If that were true then they wouldn't be using...

    * x86_64 architecture CPUs
    * Linux
    * shit they got when they bought Sun
    * lots of platform software they didn't write

    but rather something they developed on their own.

  • My cousin worked as a sales rep for Digital Equipment in the 80's We all thought it was so cool he had a VAX terminal in his billiard room. He'd get a call while we were playing pool and hop on the terminal to look up something...Today you can do that from your phone. How will this help my business again?
  • This is a matter of economics [cisco.com]. Some of the expenses for running an application vary significantly in proportion to use while others do not. In the case of cloud services and particularly for comprehensive services, this allows for the lowest achievable cost as there is not limit on savings at scale and less wasted/unused capacity over time.

    You may idealize Hadoop, Pig, Scala, et al. but realize that hosting any part of your own solution requires major investment in hardware, utility, and especially perso

    • You um, missed that important part in the middle where you have software that is readily adapted to your business model today and tomorrow, can cheaply migrate your assets to it, and maintain the revs in a way that's rationally cost-controlled yet flexible for scale and/or adaptation, acquisition, and actual return on investment.

      Like SAP and so many others, this is just a retirement plan for junior software engineers. The roads are littered with unsuccessful vertical stack-buys, especially in healthcare and

  • From what I've heard, the Oracle DB instances on the Oracle cloud are fully managed. They're also in a HA environment. With AWS you'd have to find a vendor to configure and manage that (or do it internally).

    • by lgw ( 121541 )

      Amazon offers the same [amazon.com]. Managed, and HA if you want it.

      And it's not Oracle - no contracts. Plus if you wisely hate Oracle, you have useful choices for other DBs. (Though if you want MySQL-compatible, Aurora is probably a better plan - hopefully Postgres will go live soon).

  • by cigawoot ( 1242378 ) on Friday May 05, 2017 @05:36PM (#54363969)

    We were forced into buying credit for their cloud to settle a licensing compliance dispute. The credit was only good for 12 months so we gave it a try.

    It completely sucks. Nobody should ever use it. Just use AWS, Google, or Azure instead, they've actually got mature cloud models, unlike Oracle.

    • by StormReaver ( 59959 ) on Friday May 05, 2017 @05:49PM (#54364065)

      Nobody should ever use it. Just use AWS, Google, or Azure instead, they've actually got mature cloud models, unlike Oracle.

      Or you could activate at least one brain cell, and understand that storing your business data on someone else's server, one you don't control, is horrendously stupid.

      • Do you use Salesforce? Your critical business data is in the cloud.
        Do you use Marketo? Your critical business data is in the cloud.
        Do you use O365? Your users critical business data is in the cloud.
        Do you use Google Docs? Your critical data is in the cloud.
        Do you use Github, Atlassian, Hashicorp, JetBrains, ......
      • Or you could activate at least one brain cell, and understand that storing your business data on someone else's server, one you don't control, is horrendously stupid.

        Since you claim to have at least one brain cell, perhaps you could tell us why you think this is?

  • by TWX ( 665546 ) on Friday May 05, 2017 @05:47PM (#54364053)

    "Our cloud is more comprehensive than any other cloud in the market today, a full end-to-end cloud," said David Donatelli, Oracle's executive vice president of converged infrastructure. "We design from the chip all the way up to the application, fully vertically integrated."

    So in other words, vendor lock-in? That what I take out of this, they're a vertically-integrated monopoly, meaning that they handle everything from the very top to the very bottom. Because nothing is from other entities, it means that everthing one does here is Oracle-based. Once you join and tailor your stuff to their system, you cannot simply leave their system for another.

    • Vendor lock-in is sold to, and by management as "economies of scale" and the promise that you only have one vendor responsible instead of them blaming each other.
  • by Anonymous Coward

    then based their quotes on taking 80% of our profits. Oracle is evil. They don't charge a fair price but instead take all that they can.

  • Oracle OnDemand was, and from what I hear still is, notoriously shitty.

    Call it what you want: It's still somebody else who doesn't have your business urgency in mind, with an eye towards spending the least amount of money possible (on both hardware and people) managing your database and application infrastructure....and gouging you a premium for it. In this case, it's Oracle, who really doesn't give a crap about you past your next purchase.

    Call it "Cloud". Call it "Hosted". I call it dereliction of IT Manag

  • by erp_consultant ( 2614861 ) on Friday May 05, 2017 @09:58PM (#54365351)

    I have used Oracle products for a long time. At Open World it was all they talked about. They are trying to frame this as a benefit for the customer. The real reason they are pushing cloud is that it is more profitable for Oracle. With the current ERP offerings they have to support a multitude of hardware, operating systems, databases, middleware, firewalls, etc. It is an enormous effort to try to keep up with all the 3rd party patches. By moving to cloud Oracle only has to support one stack - theirs.

    Cloud might sound great but I have seen studies that show the first few years you are ahead. After that the costs rise dramatically. Remember, you are not buying software you are renting it. You also give up a lot of control. Control over when your systems are patched, outages, feature rollouts. Your data is no longer in your control. It is sitting one someone else's servers. That alone is enough to make it a non starter.

If you fail to plan, plan to fail.

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