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Stats Programming United States

HackerRank Tries To Calculate Which US States Have The Best Developers (venturebeat.com) 66

An anonymous reader writes: Palo Alto-based HackerRank, which offers online programmng challenges, "dug into our data of about 450,000 unique U.S. developers to uncover which states are home to the best software engineers, and which pockets of the country have the highest rate of developer growth." Examining the 24 months from 2015 through the end of 2016, they calculated the average score for each state in eight programming-related domains. (Algorithms, data structures, functional programming, math, Java, Ruby, C++, and Python.) But it seems like low-population states would have fewer people taking the tests, meaning a disproportionate number of motivated and knowledgeable test takers could drastically skew the results. Sure enough, Wyoming -- with a population of just 584,153 -- has the smallest population of any U.S. state, but the site's second-highest average score, and the top score in three subject domains -- Ruby, data structures, and algorithms. And the District of Columbia -- population 681,170 -- has the highest average score for functional programming.

California, New York and Virginia still had the highest number of developers using the site, while Alaska, Wyoming and South Dakota not surprisingly had the least number of developers. But maybe the real take-away is that programmers are now becoming more distributed. HackerRank's announcement notes that the site "found growing developer communities and skilled developers all across the country. Previously, the highest concentrations of developers did not stray far from the tech hubs in California. Hawaii, Colorado, Virginia, and Nevada demonstrated the fastest growth in terms of developer activity on the HackerRank platform..." In addition, "we've had a noticeable uptick in customers across industries, from healthcare to retail and finance, with strong demand for identifying technical skills quickly."

Their conclucion? "Today, as the demand for developers goes beyond technology and as there is more opportunity to work remotely, there's a more distributed workforce of skilled developers across the nation, from the Rust Belt to the East Coast... Software developers aren't just attached to VCs, startups or Silicon Valley anymore."
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HackerRank Tries To Calculate Which US States Have The Best Developers

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Sunday July 30, 2017 @05:46PM (#54910669)

    The best developers all attended the tremendous Trump Iniversity. If that's not on your resume, don't even *think* about applying to work at my company.

  • They can't (Score:5, Insightful)

    by phantomfive ( 622387 ) on Sunday July 30, 2017 @05:57PM (#54910717) Journal
    Hackerrank can't measure the best developers because the best developers don't waste time on hackerrank.

    Furthermore, even if we assume that some of the best developers do spend time on hackerrank, the questions that hackerrank provides don't measure developer skill particularly well. A lot of them are more like tutorials.
    • Re:They can't (Score:5, Insightful)

      by h33t l4x0r ( 4107715 ) on Sunday July 30, 2017 @06:18PM (#54910807)
      The Hackerrank challenges are actually a good measure of how unemployed developers are because I can't imagine doing them if you have anything else going on. Seriously, they are fucking tedious.
      • I trust your opinion on this matter completely just because of your name.

        To be honest, even though I consider myself a competent programmer, I completely suck at the clever little programming challenges a lot of programmers seem to be good at. I think my brain just isn't wired that way. I'm pretty good at doing normal programming work, which typically involves a completely different skill set, in my opinion, along with plenty of time to experiment and reason out how to solve problems that come up. I tend

        • That's because in the real world you get a problem and have to create a solution while questioners like these are more: solve this problem using this specific technique.
        • Being able to do ridiculous nonsensical problems with b-trees, it's the most important skill any developer can have... That and "rewrite this paragraph backwards, with every word ending in a consonant in pig-latin"... type of things..
    • by plopez ( 54068 )

      I hear the whine of someone who doesn't live in Wyoming.

    • Hackerrank can't measure the best developers because the best developers don't waste time on hackerrank.

      This is an insupportable statement.

      the questions that hackerrank provides don't measure developer skill particularly well. A lot of them are more like tutorials.

      And a lot of them are tricky dynamic programming problems with constraints designed to force you to find the correct algorithmic solution because any other will murder your CPU. I mean, perhaps you could sketch out a solution for this one [hackerrank.com]? I was having a bit of a tough time finding the efficient solution, personally.

      The simpler problems are of course far more tedious but I think it's probably not a bad way to pick up a functional programming language or two.

      The more I read

      • So you are one of those best programmers who is messing around on hackerrank. Good job being a top programmer.

        If you want to find where the best programmers are, to begin with you'll do better with a random sampling, or even by attempting to attract the top programmers (like top coder, or ACM programming contest). Hackerrank markets to people who are looking for a job or are trying to build up their skills. So sampling needs to be improved, and that's even before talking about how to measure 'top,' which
        • So you are one of those best programmers who is messing around on hackerrank. Good job being a top programmer.

          I'm honestly not at all sure how you read that into my post. Was it the part where I asked for help with a problem or the part where I implied that you might be so far above my level of skill as to find all of these problems easy? I mean, I don't think that there are many people who fit that description, but I'm certainly not going to assume that a longtime slashdot contributor is not one of them. I did in point of fact assume that I was responding to someone with greater skill and experience than myself, a

          • That said, I'm a bit confused. You seem to be in favor of timed programming competitions, are you aware that HR does that, or do you find some other flaw with how they run them?

            It's not whether or not they have programming contests or not, because programming contests are not necessarily a measure of top programming ability. They measure one aspect of programming ability (my current favorite programming contest is defcon CTF, although again that only measures certain aspects of programming).

            The important thing is whether they brand or advertise themselves in a way to attract the top programmers. Topcoder is definitely attempting to do that, whereas hackerrank is branded to attr

  • The one with most Indians.

  • Except that I bring down the average. A lot.

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