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Oracle Java

Oracle Announces Java SE 9 and Java EE 8 (oracle.com) 64

rastos1 writes: Oracle has announced the general availability of Java SE 9 (JDK 9), Java Platform Enterprise Edition 8 (Java EE 8) and the Java EE 8 Software Development Kit (SDK). JDK 9 is a production-ready implementation of the Java SE 9 Platform Specification, which was recently approved together with Java EE 8 in the Java Community Process (JCP). Java SE 9 provides more than 150 new features, including a new module system and improvements that bring more scalability, improved security, better performance management and easier development to the world's most popular programming platform.
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Oracle Announces Java SE 9 and Java EE 8

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  • by TWX ( 665546 ) on Friday September 22, 2017 @04:45PM (#55247067)

    ...but the way Oracle runs it, probably getting to be most-hated and most-abandoned too. At some point most-abandoned will cross with most popular and it won't be most popular anymore.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      Well, I think Oracle is doing right in regard to Java. Even better than Sun did in the years prior to its acquisition. I know it's cool to criticize Oracle no matter what they do but... facts, please.

    • by jellomizer ( 103300 ) on Friday September 22, 2017 @05:20PM (#55247241)

      When faced to make an "Enterprise Level Product" and you have to pick a Language to code it in, you have few choices that will get past the execs.
      You have .NET, Java, C/C++ The other languages out there from Node.JS, Python, Ruby, PHP, Rust... Either do not have "Enterprise Support" (whatever that means) and in general these lanagues the Execs never heard of them before and really don't want a lecture to explain it to them.
      Then these big name languages have fancy IDE interlaces that can make frameworks from UML graphics and a bunch of crazy expensive addons that allow the sales men who such executives trust more then their own staff .

      So with all this You have .NET which is Java only for Windows. Then you have C/C++ which often will take a lot more effort to build, and there is a heck of a lot of testing needed for every new platform.

      So Java unfortunately is still a good choice with the restrictions of the corporate environment.

      • Yeah but the buzzwords of ROR, Node.js, and Rust are CIO compliant.

        • Except they may be too new for them to use. We have the Execs who were Web Designers during the 1990's Dot Com boom. Who had learned the new software is often stuff that is the most unreliable. Granted many of the newer languages have more safeguards but they don't know that.

        • by MightyMartian ( 840721 ) on Friday September 22, 2017 @07:19PM (#55247781) Journal

          When you're taliking about Java, you're talking about financial institutions and other really large corporations. They build applications they intend to use for decades. That's where Java is king, and it has 20 years worth of toolkits for that purpose. This isn't a realm where people give a shit about the latest sexy language, and where security and reliability requirements are a helluva lot more stringent than, say, Facebook's.

      • by The MAZZTer ( 911996 ) <megazzt.gmail@com> on Friday September 22, 2017 @06:41PM (#55247655) Homepage
        .NET Core, which is pretty much .NET remade to be cross-platform, is also for Mac OS/Linux too now. And I won't be surprised if platform support increases in the future though I don't think they've announced any plans for that yet.
      • The most important thing is tooling. Java has got everything checkboxed for use in Corporate Environments. You want FIPS compliant crypto? You want static code analysis? You want tools to scan usage of open source libraries? You want tool to see if your developer copy pasted code from stack overflow? Everything is a Check Yes in Java, that too most of these tools are free and reputable. The Apache and OWASP foundations literally keep Java alive. The only problematic thing is their new EOL policy for Java S
    • I just installed it

      on a related note I have to punch myself in the balls just to get it up

  • by Billly Gates ( 198444 ) on Friday September 22, 2017 @04:57PM (#55247139) Journal

    I will let them know.

    The rest of us are stuck with Java 1.4.2, 6, and 7 due to poorly written apps using RMI to go to c:\program files(x85)\...to check version numbers and using == instead of = to run.

    Or we left long ago to Ror.

    • by jellomizer ( 103300 ) on Friday September 22, 2017 @05:35PM (#55247331)

      You will never escape poorly written software no matter what language it is. One of the toughest things to teach new coders out of school, is to think forward.

      These are most common arguments with New Hires.
      1. Don't hard code paths in the system. Especially if it is in code that needs to be compiled.
      2. Don't try to be too clever with condense code, There will be a requirement change and less clever code is easier to fix.
      3. Don't drop your custom library files into the compilers library folder. This will make migrating the software to an other platform more difficult.
      4. Avoid 3rd party tools and add-ons as much as possible. As they may no longer be supported in the future or work in newer products.
      5. Make sure you use code that works well on most Systems, avoid using OS particular features unless absolutely necessary. The OS Maker may choose to change or drop that feature in the next version, or we may want to change OS's in the future.

      • But but ... but they saved $5,000 by going offshore with that Java app!

        Meanwhile got hit by wannacry because they were forced to use an insecure version of Java in the process and spent $250,000 on a security consultant to fix it. But they saved $5,000 by offshoring.

    • I will let them know.

      The rest of us are stuck with Java 1.4.2, 6, and 7 due to poorly written apps using RMI to go to c:\program files(x85)\...to check version numbers and using == instead of = to run.

      Or we left long ago to Ror.

      What sort of cavern do you call "work"? Being on Java 7 is not bad, not even 6 if we are pragmatic. But what you are describing is just insane. Obviously, everything I'll say is annecdotal, but I've not seen such crap in a long time. Who does Windows-dev specific work with Java?????

      • I will let them know.

        The rest of us are stuck with Java 1.4.2, 6, and 7 due to poorly written apps using RMI to go to c:\program files(x85)\...to check version numbers and using == instead of = to run.

        Or we left long ago to Ror.

        What sort of cavern do you call "work"? Being on Java 7 is not bad, not even 6 if we are pragmatic. But what you are describing is just insane. Obviously, everything I'll say is annecdotal, but I've not seen such crap in a long time. Who does Windows-dev specific work with Java?????

        Dude I got back in I.T. doing desktop support. Every company uses ancient Java with terrible security. We can't patch it as all the code does an == and not a less than or equal (slashcode cut off my previous comment) so if a version number is too high it will throw an exception.

        One company uses Java 1.4.2. Not 1.4.1 or 1.4.3, but 1.4.2 due to this doing RMI to c:\program files (x86) and checking the path to see the JRE version instead of damn calling the method to do this! Here is the funny part which is wo

        • by swilver ( 617741 )

          Looks like gross incompetence to me. And so gross incompetent use of Java turned you into a hater of Java, makes perfect sense. I guess you must hate all programming languages then, as I've seen gross incompetence in most of them. How you can even bear to use Windows is beyond me.

          Anyway, I'd decompile the software involved, change that "==" into a ">=" (or remove the check altogether) and be on my merry way.

    • by swilver ( 617741 )

      You know, this is actually your own fault as most companies do upgrade. You should have the balls to pack up and leave and work at a company that is with the times (if that is Java 8 or 9 or another language, it doesn't matter). You are limiting your potential and future value by continuing to work with older software.

      As a Java dev, I only have to snap my fingers and get 20 job offers... I then only have to pick the one that I like most.

  • by swsuehr ( 612400 ) on Friday September 22, 2017 @05:03PM (#55247165) Homepage

    "JDK 9 is a production-ready implementation..."

    It's about time that they're ready for production.

    • "JDK 9 is a production-ready implementation..."

      It's about time that they're ready for production.

      Meh, their Weblogic middleware isn't Java8 ready yet. There is a lot of middleware and turnkey COTS systems out there that will simply not work if you move it to JDK 8 because of unknown regressions between JDK versions.

      It is great to move to the latest JDK versions for fresh development using barebone containers,though.

  • Can it run ALL code and applets written for ALL previous java implementations? No? Then come back when its done.

    • by swilver ( 617741 )

      There isn't a single language for which this is true, unless that language only has a 1.0 version and never patched any security holes. Do you want that security exploit that worked on Java 1.0 to work on Java 9? Perhaps you do depending on what business your in, but the rest of the world doesn't.

      Java is probably *the* most backwards compatible language ever build, and they didn't make an exception with Java 9. So yes, I do expect it to run almost everything that was ever build for it.

      In the cases it doe

  • I use Java for two reasons. First, I teach and our school gradebook application is written in Java (this is a godsend, because it lets me use Linux 100% at work). Second, I teach AP CS and Java is the current language. OpenJDK works well (and it actually works for the gradebook application too, although it seems a bit buggier at times), but I do like having the Oracle JDK because it's what most of the students have (they are mostly running Windows/macOS). Very rarely (about once every couple of years) we

    • by swilver ( 617741 )

      The high DPI fix is for Swing, so it would depend on the UI toolkit used, but also on how those programs were written (if they did anything with fixed amounts of pixels, that won't scale). SWT already runs fine in high DPI (see Eclipse) and JavaFX does as well.

      I'm sure a Debian package will be along shortly for Java 9, but yes, I agree, using the Ubuntu one should be reasonably safe, especially since Java is pretty much self contained and only hooks into the underlying OS at low levels (threading, I/O, etc

Mathematics is the only science where one never knows what one is talking about nor whether what is said is true. -- Russell

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